Botched execution photos

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These Botched Execution Photos Are More Than Gruesome: They Are a Mirror to America Itself

1angel-diaz-execution-left-arm

Diaz’s left arm had an 11-by-7 inch chemical burn from the lethal drugs. By the time the autopsy began, the superficial skin had sloughed off, revealing white subcutaneous skin. (Source: New Republic)

Yesterday, The New Republic published for the first time aset of photographs of a chemically burnt corpse. The body was that of Angel Diaz, a man executed by the state of Florida in December of 2006.

As author of the piece, Ben Crair explains, “The execution team pushed IV catheters straight through the veins in both his arms and into the underlying tissue.”

Diaz sustained horrendous surface and subcutaneous chemical burns.

“As a result,” Crair continues, “Diaz required two full doses of the lethal drugs, and an execution scheduled to take only 10 to 15 minutes lasted 34. It was one of the worst botches since states began using lethal injection in the 1980s, and Jeb Bush, then the governor of Florida, responded with a moratorium on executions.”

The photographs were made by a Florida medical examiner during Diaz’s autopsy. Crair discovered the photographs in the case file of Ian Lightbourne, a Florida death-row prisoner whose lawyers submitted them as evidence that lethal injection poses an unconstitutional risk of cruel and unusual punishment. While the details of Diaz’s botched execution have been known since 2006, this is the first time visual evidence of the injuries sustained from the lethal injection has been presented publicly.

I’d like to tell you that such images are anomalous, but sadly that is not the case.

I, myself, have seen a set of images of a burnt corpse post execution. The victim in that case was executed in the electric chair. Similarly, in that case, the images were in the possession of a lawyer (who had acquired them through family of the executed) and used in court in argument against the electric chair as cruel and unusual punishment.*1

May I suggest that the photographs of Angel Diaz’ corpse, and all those images like them, be accessioned into the Library of Congress?

If the Library of Congress’ mandate is to preserve those things that are central to American culture; central to the American conscience, dear to this nation’s body politic and truly reflective of our culture, then I hold there is no better collection of images than these.

Between 1890 and 2010, the U.S. has executed 8,776 people. Of those, Austin Sarat, author of Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America’s Death Penalty says 276 went wrong in some way. Of all the methods used, lethal injection had the highest rate of botched executions — about 7%.

Photographs of a botched execution are as American as apple pie.

Whether an execution is considered officially “botched” or not, the torture imposed on a body in the minutes before death is unconscionable. Crair pursued the story and the publication of the images, rightly so, in the aftermath of the recent botched execution of Clayton Lockett in Oklahoma.

“The execution team struggled for 51 minutes to find a vein for IV access,” writes Crair, “eventually aiming for the femoral vein deep in Lockett’s groin. Something went wrong: Oklahoma first said the vein had “blown,” then “exploded,” and eventually just “collapsed,” all of which would be unusual for the thick femoral vein if an IV had been inserted correctly. Whatever it was, the drugs saturated the surrounding tissue rather than flowing into his bloodstream. The director of corrections called off the execution, at which point the lethal injection became a life-saving operation. But it was too late for Lockett. Ten minutes later, and a full hour-and-forty-seven minutes after Lockett entered the death chamber, a doctor pronounced him dead.”

CLOSING THE BLINDS

The single detail about the Oklahoma debacle that really stuck in my mind was the state’s decision — upon realising the execution was being botched — to drop the blinds.

The gallery of spectators including press, victim’s family and prisoner’s family lost their privileged view.

In that instance when the blinds dropped, the scene switched from that of official, public enactment of justice to the messy, sick, complicit torture of a human. In that instance, the barbarity of the state revealed itself fully. And the state was ashamed. The public were no longer allowed to see.

The notion — indeed the internal logic of the state — that viewing one type of execution is acceptable and another is not is astounding. By virtue of its actions during Lockett’s botched execution, the state has distinguished between what types of torture (execution) it is acceptable to see. Quick, quiet, seemingly painless = good. Noisy, drawn out, demonstratively torturous = not good.

The distinctions are petty. All executions are cruel and unusual.

At this point, I can only presume those who still support the death penalty are those who subscribe to some pathological eye-for-an-eye illogic. Wake up! The state shouldn’t be involved in murdering people. Especially when we have seen 1 in 10 people locked up for life or on death row for capital offenses later exonerated due to DNA evidence or prosecutorial misconduct. The state shouldn’t be involved in murdering innocent people.

*1 People are under the misconception that the electric chair zaps a person and kills them instantly. This is not the case. Electricity takes the paths of least resistance which is outside of the body. Therefore, tens of thousands of volts serve only to burn the points at which they are attached, namely the lower leg and the skull. Death by electric chair is in fact just boiling the victims brain for 7 seconds. Boiling the brain alive.

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Death By Firing Squad Is Now A Thing Again

A list of the worst botched executions of history.

Regardless of how one feels about the death penalty, only armchair sadists would agree that it’s justified for the government to torture murderers with the same lack of compassion that the murderers used to kill their victims—after all, we’re taught very early in life that “two wrongs don’t make a right.”

During the 120-year span from 1890 to 2010, nearly 9,000 people were legally executed in America. Of these, an estimated 276 were “botched” in some way—in other words, the execution didn’t proceed exactly as planned and may have required additional attempts. In many cases, it also involved unplanned suffering on the convict’s part to the point where witnesses were traumatized.

Ironically, lethal injection was introduced late in the game as the most “humane” method of capital punishment, yet it has the highest rate of botched attempts out of all—just over 7% of lethal injections ran into some form of difficulty. This compares to 5.4% for the gas chamber, 3% for hanging, and just under 2% for the electric chair. By comparison, death by firing squad—once considered the most brutal and ineffective method of all—resulted in zero botched executions in the 34 times it was performed from 1890 to 2010.

These 13 cases involve some of the most gruesome examples of public execution gone wrong in world history.

1. Flames Erupted From His Head

When he was placed into the electric chair in May of 1990, convicted murderer and rapist Jesse Joseph Tafero required three jolts of power before it killed him. An “inadvertent human error” involving the use of a synthetic sponge rather than a natural sponge was blamed for the error, but in the first two attempts to kill Tafero, witnesses said they saw flames erupting from Tafero’s head. Inmates at the prison claimed they could smell his burning flesh for days after he was killed. Perhaps the most tragic part of this story is that after his death, one of Tafero’s accomplices claimed responsibility for the murders for which Tafero received the death penalty.

2. It Took 11 Blows From An Ax To Kill Her

An English aristocrat who lived in the 1400s, Lady Margaret de la Pole suffered the misfortune of getting entangled in the bloody dispute over King Henry VIII’s attempts to divorce the queen and marry Anne Boleyn. Although she was guilty of nothing, she was arrested for treason placed in the Tower of London for over two years before finally facing a public execution—at the hands of an axe-wielding man with extremely bad aim. In front of about 150 onlookers, the executioner hacked at her a total of 11 times before finally decapitating her. Lady Margaret undoubtedly experienced tremendous agony before finally being killed.

3. The First Ten Bullets Didn’t Kill Her

To the Western eye, Thai names are hopelessly complicated, and “Ginggaew Lorsoungnern” is certainly no exception. A domestic maid for an elite Bangkok family, she kidnapped the family’s six-year-old son and delivered him to a gang that held him for ransom. The family refused to pay the ransom, and the gang stabbed the boy repeatedly. However, this is not what killed him, as coroners later determined he died from suffocation after being buried alive. For her part in the boy’s murder, Lorsoungnern was sentenced to death by firing squad. After being tied to a cross and riddled with ten bullets, examiners saw no vital signs in the woman. Her body was moved into a morgue, but once placed upon the morgue table, she began to sit up. It took another 15 bullets to finally kill her.

4. The Room Filled With Smoke And The Smell Of Burning Flesh

After an extended crime spree of 30 armed robberies, nine kidnappings, and finally the murder of a pawn shop owner, John Evans was arrested in Alabama and sentenced to death. He told officials that if released, he would kill again. In April 1983, Alabama officials strapped him into an electric chair and delivered a fatal jolt…or what they thought was a fatal jolt. According to one reporter, “Smoke and sparks…came out from under the hood in the vicinity of Evans’s left temple” after this first jolt. But examiners found that his heart was still beating. It took two more jolts and a total of 14 minutes before Evans was finally dead. Witnesses said they smelled smoke and burning flesh, and after the third jolt, Evans’s dead body was left “charred and smoldering.”

5. He Died Banging His Head Against A Steel Pole

It’s hard to feel sorry for Jimmy Lee Gray—after being paroled for killing his girlfriend, he kidnapped a three-year-old girl, raped her, tried drowning her in a creek, and finally killed her by stomping on her neck and snapping it. Sentenced to die in a Mississippi gas chamber, it took nearly eight minutes to kill Gray—during which witnesses had to be cleared from the room after he began moaning and smashing his head against a steel pole inside the gas chamber. Some have speculated that due to the nature of his crimes, his execution was deliberately botched. After Gray was dead, it was revealed that his executioner had been drunk.

6. Lethal Chemicals Were Sprayed At Witnesses

Sentenced to die by lethal injection for the fatal shooting of a Texas restaurant owner, Raymond Landry was led into a room and injected with fatal chemicals on December 13, 1988. However, the IV needle that had been placed in Landry’s arm exploded, spraying the lethal fluids toward witnesses. Witnesses heard him groan at least once during the ordeal. A second injection was attempted and finally proved successful. But from start to finish, it took an estimated 40 minutes to kill Landry.

7. “I Saw His Body Turn From Red To Purple”

Sentenced to the gas chamber in Arizona in 1992, Donald Lee Harding endured an agonizing 10 minutes while violently struggling against his restraining straps before he finally succumbed. One reporter who saw the execution said that Harding spasmed and jerked for nearly seven minutes. Another witness claimed that two other witnesses were “walking vegetables” for days after viewing his ex execution. According to TV reporter Cameron Harper, “Obviously, this man was suffering. This was a violent death … an ugly event. We put animals to death more humanely.”[24] Another witness, newspaper reporter Carla McClain, said, “Harding’s death was extremely violent. He was in great pain. I heard him gasp and moan. I saw his body turn from red to purple.”

8. Blood Was Forming In The Shape Of A Cross

Due to his tremendous size—about 350 pounds—Florida officials constructed a special electric chair to dispatch killer Allen Lee Davis. According to witnesses, the spectacle was brutal: “Before he was pronounced dead … the blood from his mouth had poured onto the collar of his white shirt, and the blood on his chest had spread to about the size of a dinner plate, even oozing through the buckle holes on the leather chest strap holding him to the chair.” A Florida state senator who viewed the execution photos said that the blood eventually formed the shape of a cross, which she took as a sign that God had approved of the execution.

9. Man Decapitated By Hanging

Back in the late 1800s, Tom “Black Jack Ketchum” was a classic Old West outlaw, part of a posse that robbed and killed its way across New Mexico and Texas. He was finally arrested and sentenced to death by hanging in Clayton, NM. But because executioners forgot to remove the 200-pound sandbag that was used to test the gallows before hanging Ketchum, the rope was especially tight. Instead of merely hanging to death, Ketchum was decapitated.

10. Woman Decapitated By Hanging

This story is amazingly similar to that of Tom Ketchum’s in that it happened in the Southwest in the late 1800s and involved a botched hanging that decapitated the victim. It was different in that it happened in Arizona rather than New Mexico and involved a female murderer, Eva Dugan, who insisted on her innocence up until the end. When her head snapped off, it rolled right in front of spectators’ feet, shocking the crowd. Immediately after the execution, Arizona replaced the gallows with the gas chamber as their preferred mode of execution.

11. A Billow Of Smoke And The Odor Of Burning Hair

In 1890, William Kemmler, convicted of murdering his wife with a hatchet, went down in history as the first criminal to die in the electric chair. After one strong jolt, officials assumed Kemmler was dead, only to realize that he was still bleeding from his hands and mouth, indicating that his heart was still pumping. He was indeed alive and started groaning loudly. He received a second jolt, which according to one scribe caused “sickening sizzling sound [to come] from the chair, as if meat was being cooked upon it, followed by a billow of smoke that filled the room with the odor of burning hair.” Although witnesses were traumatized, Kemmler was finally dead.

12. A Crown Of Foot-High Flames Over His Head

In 1997, convicted murderer Pedro Medina was placed in a Florida electric chair, but his execution did not go smoothly. According to one observer, “A crown of foot-high flames shot from the headpiece during the execution, filling the execution chamber with a stench of thick smoke and gagging the two dozen official witnesses.” The power was temporarily switched off, but Medina kept writhing and burning until he finally died.

13. The Odor And Sizzling Sound Of Burning Flesh

Frank Coppola was a Virginia cop who was sentenced to death for the 1978 murder of his girlfriend, during which he repeatedly slammed her head in the floor. After she was dead, Coppola and accomplices absconded with over $3,000 and some jewelry from the crime scene. In 1982 he finally was strapped into an electric chair. After an initial jolt that lasted an agonizing 55 seconds, he still wasn’t dead, whereupon he received another 55-second jolt, which witness say produced the smell and sound of burning flesh. The second jolt was also so intense that it caused both of Coppola’s legs to burst into flames. Thought Catalog Logo Mark

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Botched Executions

ENDNOTES

[1]. Deborah W. Denno, Is Electrocution an Unconstitutional Method of Execution? The Engineering of Death over the Century, 35WILLIAM&MARY L. REV. 551, 664 – 665 (1994).

[2]. For a descrip­tion of the exe­cu­tion by Evans’s defense attor­ney, see Russell F. Canan, Burning at the Wire: The Execution of John Evans, in FACINGTHEDEATHPENALTY: ESSAYSON A CRUELANDUNUSUALPUNISHMENT60 (Michael L. Radelet ed. 1989); see also Glass v. Louisiana, 471 U.S. 1080, 1091 – 92 (1985).

[3]. David Bruck, Decisions of Death, THENEWREPUBLIC, Dec. 12, 1984, at 24 – 25.

[4]. Ivan Solotaroff, The Last Face You’ll Ever See, 124ESQUIRE90, 95 (Aug. 1995).

[5]. Two Charges Needed to Electrocute Georgia Murderer, N.Y. TIMES, Dec. 13, 1984, at 12.

[6]. Editorial, N.Y. TIMES, Dec. 17, 1984, at 22.

[7]. Murderer of Three Women is Executed in Texas, N.Y. TIMES, March 14, 1985, at 9.

[8]. Killer’s Electrocution Takes 17 Minutes in Indiana Chair, WASH. POST, Oct. 17, 1985, at A16.

[9]. Indiana Executes Inmate Who Slew Father-In-Law, N.Y. TIMES, Oct. 17, 1985, at 22.

[10]. Killer Lends A Hand to Find A Vein for Execution, L.A. TIMES, Aug. 20, 1986, at 2.

[11]. Addict Is Executed in Texas For Slaying of 2 in Robbery, N.Y. TIMES, June 25, 1987, at A24.

[12]. Drawn-out Execution Dismays Texas Inmates, DALLASMORNINGNEWS, Dec. 15, 1988, at 29A.

[13]. Landry Executed for ​’82 Robbery-Slaying, DALLASMORNINGNEWS, Dec. 13, 1988, at 29A.

[14]. Witness to an Execution, HOUS. CHRON., May 27, 1989, at 11.

[15]. John Archibald, On Second Try, Dunkins Executed for Murder, BIRMINGHAMNEWS, July 14, 1989, at 1.

[16]. Peter Applebome, 2 Jolts in Alabama Execution, N.Y. TIMES, July 15, 1989, at 6.

[17]. Cynthia Barnett, Tafero Meets Grisly Fate in Chair, GAINESVILLESUN, May 5, 1990, at 1; Cynthia Barnett, A Sterile Scene Turns Grotesque, GAINESVILLESUN, May 5, 1990, at 1; Bruce Ritchie, Flames, Smoke Mar Execution of Murderer, FLORIDATIMES-UNION (Jacksonville), May 5, 1990, at 1; Bruce Ritchie, Report on Flawed Execution Cites Human Error, FLORIDATIMES-UNION (Jacksonville), May 9, 1990, at B1.

[18]. Bill Moss, Chair Concerns Put Deaths on Hold, ST. PETERSBURGTIMES, July 18, 1990, at 1B.

[19]. Niles Group Questions Execution Procedure, UNITEDPRESSINTERNATIONAL, Nov. 8, 1992 (LEXIS/​NEXUS file).

[20]. Mike Allen, Groups Seek Probe of Electrocution’s Unusual Events, RICHMONDTIMES-DISPATCH, Oct. 19, 1990, at B1; Mike Allen, Minister Says Execution Was Unusual, RICHMONDTIMES-DISPATCH, Oct. 20, 1990, at B1; DeNeen L. Brown, Execution Probe Sought, WASH. POST, Oct. 21, 1990, at D1.

[21]. Karen Haywood, Two Jolts Needed to Complete Execution, THEFREE-LANCESTAR (Fredericksburg, Vir.), Aug. 23, 1991, at 1; Death Penalty Opponents Angry About Latest Execution, RICHMONDTIMES-DISPATCH, Aug. 24, 1991, at 1; Virginia Alters its Procedure for Executions in Electric Chair, WASH. POST, Aug. 24, 1991, at B3.

[22]. Joe Farmer, Rector, 40, Executed for Officer’s Slaying, ARKANSASDEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, Jan. 25, 1992, at 1; Joe Farmer, Rector’s Time Came, Painfully Late, ARKANSASDEMOCRATGAZETTE, Jan. 26, 1992, at 1B; Sonja Clinesmith, Moans Pierced Silence During Wait, ARKANSASDEMOCRATGAZETTE, Jan. 26, 1992, at 1B; Marshall Frady, Death in Arkansas, THENEWYORKER, Feb. 22, 1993, at 105.

[23]. Gruesome Death in Gas Chamber Pushes Arizona Toward Injections, N.Y. TIMES, Apr. 25, 1992, at 9.

[24]. Charles L. Howe, Arizona Killer Dies in Gas Chamber, S.F. CHRON., Apr. 7, 1992, at A2.

[25]. Id.

[26]. Abraham Kwok, Injection: The No-Fuss Executioner, ARIZONAREPUBLIC, Feb. 28, 1993, at 1.

[27]. Wayne Greene, 11-Minute Execution Seemingly Took Forever, TULSAWORLD, Mar. 11, 1992, at A13.

[28]. Another U.S. Execution Amid Criticism Abroad, N.Y. TIMES, Apr. 24, 1992, at B7.

[29]. Robert Wernsman, Convicted Killer May Dies, ITEM (Huntsville, Tex.), May 7, 1992, at 1.

[30]. Michael Graczyk, Convicted Killer Gets Lethal Injection, HERALD (Denison, Tex.), May 8, 1992.

[31]. Scott Fornek and Alex Rodriguez, Gacy Lawyers Blast Method: Lethal Injections Under Fire After Equipment Malfunction, CHICAGOSUN-TIMES, May 11, 1994, at 5; Rich Chapman, Witnesses Describe Killer’s ​‘Macabre’ Final Few Minutes, CHICAGOSUN-TIMES, May 11, 1994, at 5.

[32]. Rob Karwath & Susan Kuczka, Gacy Execution Delay Blamed on Clogged IV Tube, CHICAGOTRIB., May 11, 1994, at 1 (Metro Lake Section).

[33]. Because they could not observe the entire exe­cu­tion pro­ce­dure through the closed blinds, two wit­ness­es lat­er refused to sign the stan­dard affi­davit that stat­ed they had wit­nessed the exe­cu­tion. Witnesses to a Botched Execution, ST. LOUISPOST-DISPATCH, May 8, 1995, at 6B. 

[34]. Tim O’Neil, Too-Tight Strap Hampered Execution, ST. LOUISPOST-DISPATCH, May 5, 1995, at B1; Jim Slater, Execution Procedure Questioned, KANSASCITYSTAR, May 4, 1995, at C8.

[35]. Witnesses to a Botched Execution, ST. LOUISPOST-DISPATCH, May 8, 1995, at 6B.

[36]. Store Clerk’s Killer Executed in Virginia, N.Y. TIMES, Jan. 25, 1996, at A19.

[37]. The involve­ment of this anony­mous physi­cian vio­lat­ed rules of both the American Medical Association and the Indiana State Medical Association. Sherri Edwards & Suzanne McBride, Doctor’s Aid in Injection Violated Ethics Rule: Physician Helped Insert the Lethal Tube in a Breach of AMA’s Policy Forbidding Active Role in Execution, INDIANAPOLISSTAR, July 19, 1996, at A1.

[38]. Id.; Suzanne McBride, Problem With Vein Delays Execution, INDIANAPOLISNEWS, July 18, 1996, at 1.

[39]. Doug Martin, Flames Erupt from Killer’s Headpiece, GAINESVILLESUN, March 26, 1997, at 1. Medina was exe­cut­ed despite a life-long his­to­ry of men­tal ill­ness, and the Florida Supreme Court split 4 – 3 on whether to grant an evi­den­tiary hear­ing because of seri­ous ques­tions about his guilt. This puts to rest any con­ceiv­able argu­ment that Medina could have been guilty ​“beyond a rea­son­able doubt.” Medina v. State, 690 So.2d1241 (1997). The fam­i­ly of the vic­tim had joined in a plea for exec­u­tive clemen­cy, in part because they believed Medina was inno­cent. Id., at 1252, n. 6. Even the Pope appealed for clemen­cy. Martin, op. cit.

[40]. Michael Overall & Michael Smith, 22-Year-Old Killer Gets Early Execution, TULSAWORLD, May 8, 1997, at A1.

[41]. Killer Helps Officials Find A Vein At His Execution, CHATTANOOGAFREEPRESS, June 13, 1997, at A7.

[42]. Cannon was exe­cut­ed for a crime com­mit­ted when he was 17 years old. 1st Try Fails to Execute Texas Death Row Inmate, ORLANDOSENT., Apr. 23, 1998, at A16; Michael Graczyk, Texas Executes Man Who Killed San Antonio Attorney at Age 17, AUSTINAMERICAN-STATESMAN, Apr. 23, 1998, at B5.

[43]. Michael Graczyk, Reputed Marijuana Smuggler Executed for 1988 Dallas Slaying, ASSOCIATEDPRESS, August 27, 1998.

[44]. Sean Whaley, Nevada Executes Killer, LASVEGASREVIEW-JOURNAL, Oct. 5, 1998, at 1A.

[45]. Davis Execution Gruesome, GAINESVILLESUN, July 8, 1999, at 1A.

[46]. Provenzano v. State, 744 So.2d413, 440 (Fla. 1999).

[47]. Id.

[48]. Id. at 442 – 44.

[49]. Mary Jo Melone, A Switch is Thrown, and God Speaks, ST. PETERSBURGTIMES, July 13, 1999, p. 1B.

[50] Ron Moore, At Last I can be with my Babies, SCOTTISHDAILYRECORD, May 4, 2000, at 24.

[51]. Rick Bragg, Florida Inmate Claims Abuse in Execution, N.Y. TIMES, June 9, 2000, at A14; Phil Long & Steve Brousquet, Execution of Slayer Goes Wrong; Delay, Bitter Tirade Precede His Death, MIAMIHERALD, June 8, 2000.

[52] Sarah Rimer, Working Death Row, N.Y. TIMES, Dec. 17, 2000, at 1.

[53]. David Scott, Convicted Killer Who Once Asked to Die is Executed, ASSOCIATEDPRESS, June 28, 2000.

[54]. Letter from attor­ney Cheryl Rafert to Missouri Governor Mel Carnahan, June 30, 2000.

[55] Tim O’Neil, Lawyer Says Client Convulsed Violently During Execution; But Three Reporters Say It Did Not hap­pen, St. Louis Post Dispatch, July 6, 2000.

[56] Rhonda Cook, Gang Leader Executed by Injection; Death Comes 25 Years After Boy, 11, Slain, ATLANTAJOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, November 7, 2001, at 1B (MetroSection).

[57] Alan Johnson, ​‘It Don’t Work,’ Inmate Says During Botched Execution, Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, May 3, 2006.

[57] Adam Liptak, Trouble Finding Inmate’s Vein Slows Lethal Injection in Ohio, N.Y. Times, May 3, 2006; John Mangels, Condemned Killer Complains Lethal Injection ​‘Isn’t Working,’ Plain Dealer (Cleveland), May 3, 2006.

[58] Terry Aguayo, Florida Death Row Inmate Dies Only After Second Chemical Dose, New York Times, Dec. 15, 2006.

[59] Adam Liptak & Terry Aguayo, After Problem Execution, Governor Bush Suspends the Death Penalty in Florida, New York Times, Dec. 16, 2006.

[60] Ben Crair, Photos from a Botched Lethal Injection, The New Republic, May 29, 2014, avail­able at 

[61]Associated Press, May 24, 2007.

[62] Lateef Mungin, Triple Murderer Executed After 40-minute Search for Vein, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 27, 2007.

[63] Rhonda Cook, Executioners had Trouble Putting Murderer to Death: For 35 Minutes, They couldn’t find good Vein for Lethal Injection, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 4, 2008.

[65] Alan Johnson, Effort to Kill Inmate Halted — 2 Hours of Needle Sticks Fail; Strickland Steps In, Columbus Dispatch, Sept. 16, 2009.

[66] Bob Driehaus, Ohio Plans to Try Again as Execution Goes Wrong, New York Times, Sept. 17, 2009; Stephen Majors, Governor Delays Execution After Suitable Vein Can’t Be Found, Chillicothe Gazette, Sept. 16, 2009.

[67] Greg Bluestein, Georgia Executes Inmate Who Had Attempted Suicide, ATLANTAJOURNALANDCONSTITUTION, Sept. 27, 2010.

[68] Erica Goode, After a Prolonged Execution in Ohio, Questions over ​‘Cruel and Unusual,’ NEWYORKTIMES, Jan. 17, 2014.

[69] Family Sues in Protracted Ohio Execution, NEWYORKTIMES, Jan 25, 2014, http://​www​.nytimes​.com/​2​0​1​4​/​0​1​/​2​6​/​u​s​/​f​a​m​i​l​y​-​s​u​e​s​-​i​n​-​p​r​o​t​r​a​c​t​e​d​-​o​h​i​o​-exec.…

[70] Bailey Elise McBride & Sean Murphy, Oklahoma Inmate Dies after Execution is Botched, Associated Press, Apr. 29, 2014, avail­able at https://​apnews​.com/.

[71] Eric Eckholm, One Execution Botched, Oklahoma Delays the Next, New York Times, Apr. 29, 2014.

[72]Erik Eckholm, Arizona Takes Nearly 2 Hours to Execute Inmate, New York Times, Jul. 23, 2014;

[73] Bob Ortega, Michael Kiefer, & Mariana Dale, Execution of Arizona Murderer Takes Nearly 2 Hours, The Republic, avail­able at http://​www​.azcen​tral​.com/​s​t​o​r​y​/​n​e​w​s​/​l​o​c​a​l​/​a​r​i​z​o​n​a​/​2​0​1​4​/​0​7​/​2​3​/​a​r​i​z​o​n​a​-​e​x​e​c​u​t​i​o​n​-​b​o​t​c​h​e​d​/​1​3​0​7​0677/.

[74]Rhonda Cook, Georgia Executes Brian Keith Terrell after Struggling to Find Vein, ATLANTAJOURNALANDCONSTITUTION, Dec. 9, 2015, avail­able at http://​www​.ajc​.com/​n​e​w​s​/​n​e​w​s​/​l​o​c​a​l​/​b​r​i​a​n​-​k​e​i​t​h​-​t​e​r​r​e​l​l​s​-​e​x​e​c​u​t​i​o​n​-​s​till-.…

[75]Chris McDaniel, Georgia Executioners Struggled To Set IVs In Recent Lethal Injections Executioners took near­ly an hour set the IVs in two recent lethal injec­tions, accord­ing to time­lines obtained by BuzzFeed News through pub­lic records requests and eye­wit­ness accounts, BUZZFEED, Feb. 16, 2016, avail­able at https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/chrismcdaniel/georgia-executioners-struggled-to-set-ivs-in-recent-lethal‑i

[76]Kent Faulk, Alabama Death Row Inmate Ronald Bert Smith Heaved, Coughed for 13 Minutes During exe­cu­tion, ALcom, http://​www​.al​.com/​n​e​w​s​/​b​i​r​m​i​n​g​h​a​m​/​i​n​d​e​x​.​s​s​f​/​2​0​1​6​/​1​2​/​a​l​a​b​a​m​a​_​d​e​a​t​h​_​r​ow_in.…

[77] Andrew Welsh-Huggins, Ohio Calls Off Execution after Failing to Find Inmate’s Vein, Associated Press/​ABC News, Nov. 15, 2017; http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/ohio-set-execute-inmate-walking‑b.…

[78] Tracy Connor, Lawyer Describes Aborted Execution Attempt for Doyle Lee Hamm as ​‘Torture,’ https://​www​.nbc​news​.com/​s​t​o​r​y​l​i​n​e​/​l​e​t​h​a​l​-​i​n​j​e​c​t​i​o​n​/​l​a​w​y​e​r​-​c​a​l​l​s​-​a​b​o​rted-… (Feb 25, 2018); Roger Cohen, Death Penalty Madness in Alabama, N.Y. Times, Feb. 27, 2018.

Sours: https://deathpenaltyinfo.org/executions/botched-executions
GRAPHIC - RARE Photos of Public EXECUTIONS

Killer's skin rips and he 'chokes for air' in 'worst botched execution ever'

Just after 6pm on December 13, 2006, Angel Nieves Diaz grimaced in pain and jutted his head as a lethal cocktail of drugs was pumped into the convicted killer's body.

Witnesses looked on in horror as he struggled to speak and coughed before his body shuddered while strapped to a gurney in the ensuing ten minutes.

By then he should have been dead, but the execution was botched from the beginning - needles were mistakenly inserted into soft tissue in his arm instead of veins, resulting in horrific chemical burns.

He remained conscious and at one point asked: "What's going on?"

Diaz, 55, appeared to stop moving but his body suddenly "jolted" in the 24th minute and he opened his eyes widely, sparking panic in the death chamber in Florida's state prison.

Angel Diaz

By the time he was finally pronounced dead, two full doses were administered and the execution lasted 34 minutes instead of the usual ten to 15.

It was clear the convicted murderer suffered as chemical burns turned the skin on his arms black and caused the outer layer to tear away, exposing pink and white flesh.

Abnormal swelling in his neck suggested he may have struggled for air during one of the worst botched executions of all time.

The gruesome death sparked immediate outrage, forcing then-governor Jeb Bush, the brother of then-president George W Bush, to temporarily suspend executions so Florida's lethal injection protocol could be reviewed.

The murder

Born in Puerto Rico, career criminal Diaz was 28 when he and two friends held up a strip club - the Velvet Swing Lounge - in Miami on December 29, 1979.

Bar manager Joseph Nagy was shot dead during the robbery while most of the terrified customers and staff were locked in a toilet.

The murder went unsolved until 1983, when Diaz's then-girlfriend told the police that he was involved.

Diaz was arrested and in 1986 was put on trial, where he represented himself even though he barely spoke English and there were claims he wasn't competent.

He pleaded not guilty and in his defence he claimed that a co-defendant, Angel Toro, was responsible for the murder.

But he was found guilty and sentenced to death in an 8-4 vote by a jury.

The prosecution's case relied on evidence from Ralph Gajus, an inmate who claimed Diaz had confessed in jail to shooting Mr Nagy.

Diaz's legal team later produced a sworn declaration from Gajus, who admitted that he had lied because he was angry with Diaz after being left out of a previous escape attempt and the police had promised to help him with the charges he was facing at the time.

Despite Diaz's claims that he was convicted based on bogus testimony and faulty evidence, his last-ditch appeals - including one challenging the chemicals used - were denied.

The governor refused to grant clemency as the convicted killer's date in the execution chamber approached.

For his part, Toro accepted a deal with prosecutors and was sentenced to life in prison.

The execution

Almost 27 years after the strip club murder, Diaz was put to death at the state prison in rural upstate Florida.

He refused to order a last meal and was served a meal off the menu of the day - shredded turkey, shredded cheese, rice, pinto beans and tortilla shells, along with apple crisp for dessert and iced tea to drink.

In his final statement, he said in Spanish: "The state of Florida is killing an innocent person. The state of Florida is committing a crime, because I am innocent.

"The death penalty is not only a form of vengeance, but also a cowardly act by humans.

"I'm sorry for what is happening to me and my family who have been put through this."

Diaz was restrained on a gurney and the curtain opened at 6pm local time on December 13, 2006, as witnesses - including journalists, a chaplain and prison staff - watched.

After the final statement, three drugs were pumped into Diaz - one intended to dull his pain, a second to paralyse his body and a third to stop his heart.

At 6.02pm he was seen grimacing and appearing to say something.

Four minutes later he continued to move and blink his eyes and his chin jutted as if he was in pain. The movements continued for a few more minutes.

At one point, he was heard muttering: "What's going on?"

At 6.12pm - around the time Diaz should have died - his head shifted to the right, he began coughing and his body appeared to shudder.

Three minutes later his mouth opened and he breathed heavily.

It was clear something had gone wrong. A member of the execution team got on the phone at 6.18pm as Diaz continued to breathe deeply and move.

Diaz began to slowly stop moving but at 6.26 there were distressing scenes as his body suddenly jolted and his eyes opened widely.

An execution team member got back on the phone and a doctor, whose face was masked, entered at 6.34pm to check Diaz's vital signs.

There are 29 US states where the death penalty is still legal and lethal injection is the primary method for each one.

Some states have authorised one or more alternative methods in circumstances where others are deemed unconstitutional or are unavailable or impractical.

Some states allow the death row prisoner to choose an alternative if they don't want to be injected with a lethal cocktail of drugs.

Nine states still allow electrocution - Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

The gas chamber is an alternative in seven states - Alabama, Arizona, California, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma and Wyoming.

Hanging is still an option in Delaware, New Hampshire and Washington.

Three states - Mississippi, Oklahoma and Utah - still permit execution by firing squad, with the last such case happening in Utah in 2010. This method has been used three times since 1976.

A minute later, the doctor returned to check for a pulse, and then nodded to the execution team.

Two minutes later, at 6.36pm, Diaz was pronounced dead and the curtain closed. His family described it as "torture".

When lethal injections go as planned the inmate is usually unconscious and motionless within five minutes and dead within ten to 15.

A day later, it emerged that a second dose was needed to kill Diaz because the needles were wrongly injected through his veins and into the soft tissue in his arms.

In the fallout, James McDonough, then the secretary of Florida's prison system, said the executioners did not notice any swelling in Diaz's arms and he was told that the inmate had become unconscious and was heard snoring .

Witnesses said otherwise.

The gruesome scene

Witnesses were left traumatised after watching Diaz die in an execution that lasted more than twice as long as it should have.

His chaplain, Rev Dale Recinella, told how he watched in horror as Diaz writhed in pain after the convicted killer asked him to be there for him.

The chaplain, who has witnessed almost 20 executions, previously told Mirror Online: "I have never witnessed an execution by electric chair, thank the Lord.

"But I have witnessed a botched lethal injection and what I found out is there is not much difference between burning a human being to death alive from the outside in with electricity than burning a human being to death from the inside out with chemicals.

"I testified in a court case to try and ban executions in Florida because of what Angel suffered during the last 34 minutes of his life."

Mr Recinella said he sees a counsellor to help him digest the horrors he has witnessed at the state prison.

Former journalist Ron Word wrote in his report afterwards that it seemed like Diaz would never die.

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At one point, the convicted killer even looked towards the official 25 witnesses.

Mr Word previously told Mirror Online: "It took more than a half-hour for Diaz to die, a process that usually takes 10 minutes.

"He appeared to be conscious for much of the procedure.

"Corrections official blamed the long process on liver disease, but the autopsy showed the IV line delivering the deadly chemicals had been pushed through his veins into his arms.

"The medical examiner noted chemical burns and said there was no evidence of liver disease."

It wasn't the first time Mr Word had witnessed a botched execution.

He once saw flames shoot out of the head of a convicted killer who died in an electric chair called "Old Sparky".

As a journalist, he witnessed more than 60 executions, including the electric chair death of serial killer Ted Bundy.

The fallout

Jeb Bush

It has been more than 50 years since the last prisoners were put to death in the UK.

Peter Allen, 21, and Gwynne Evans, 24, were hanged at separate prisons - Walton and Strangeways - on August 13, 1964 for robbing and murdering laundry worker John West.

Their deaths came a year and three months before the death penalty for murder in Great Britain was suspended for five years - and and replaced with a mandatory life sentence - under the Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) Act 1965. The act became permanent four years later.

The death penalty for murder in Northern Ireland was abolished in 1973.

The so-called "Bloody Code" remained for crimes including espionage and treason until it was fully abolished in 1998.

Britain is now barred from restoring the death penalty as long as it is a member of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Capital punishment had been used for centuries in the countries that became the UK. Death sentences were doled out for crimes including murder, rape, theft, adultery, arson and witchcraft.

Ancient methods were grotesque and especially cruel - ranging from beheadings and live burials to people being burned at the stake or thrown to wild animals.

As times changed, so did attitudes, with capital punishment undergoing many reforms to eliminate certain methods and crimes, and eventually raise the minimum age to 18.

Public executions ended in the UK in 1968.

After the execution, Governor Bush initially claimed that all protocols were followed. He blamed a "preexisting medical condition" for the execution taking much longer than usual.

But a day later, amid increasing pressure, he called for a review under Mr McDonough's watch and the explanation soon changed.

Corrections spokeswoman Gretl Plessinger had told reporters that Diaz was given a second dose because he suffered from liver disease, which slowed his metabolism, the New York Times reported the day after the execution.

She said: “It was not unanticipated that the metabolism of drugs delivered would take additional time."

Diaz's family told reporters that they weren't aware of the condition.

Ms Plessinger also claimed it wasn't believed that Diaz was in any pain.

The statement from the governor said: "A preexisting medical condition of the inmate was the reason tonight's procedure took longer than recent procedures carried out this year."

But a coroner, who was ordered to carry out an expedited post-mortem, revealed that the needle with the lethal chemicals had punctured Diaz's veins and gone into his soft tissue.

Death penalty opponents argued that the inmate had suffered during a botched execution, fuelling their calls for the "cruel and unusual" practice to be abolished across the US.

Mark Elliott, a spokesman for Floridians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, told the New York Times back then: “This is further proof of the broken death penalty system in Florida. Florida has no business in executions.”

Amid mounting shock and outrage, one of Diaz's lawyers asked Florida's Supreme Court to declare the state's lethal injection procedure unconstitutional.

Two days after saying all protocols were followed, Governor Bush suspended all upcoming executions so Florida's lethal injection protocol could be reviewed, asking a commission to probe the "humanity, constitutional imperative and common sense" of procedures.

In 2014, eight years after Diaz's death, horrific photos emerged showing the chemical burns on his arms.

The executions resume

After Diaz's death, Florida's execution chamber was silent for more than 18 months until convicted murderer and paedophile Mark Schwab, 39, was put to death by lethal injection on July 2, 2008.

Under a new governor, Charlie Crist, Florida resumed executions after updating its procedures - requiring more staff training and better monitoring of proceedings in the death chamber - and following a US Supreme Court ruling.

It kept the three-drug method.

Schwab, convicted of kidnapping, raping and killing an 11-year-old boy, Junny Rios-Martinez, in 1991, was the first prisoner to die under the state's updated procedures and the first in Florida after the Supreme Court ruled that the three-drug cocktail was not cruel and unusual punishment under the Constitution.

Florida has executed 35 prisoners since Diaz, all by lethal injection.

Lethal injection remains the primary method in the 29 states where the death penalty is still legal.

On November 7, the state is scheduled to executed its 100th prisoner since capital punishment resumed in 1976.

James Dailey, now 73, was convicted of stabbing and drowning 14-year-old Shelly Boggio in 1985.

Sours: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/us-news/killers-skin-rips-chokes-air-20640784

Photos botched execution

Botched Execution

'Botched Execution' - 18 News Result(s)

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Check the NDTV Archives:https://archives.ndtv.com

Sours: https://www.ndtv.com/topic/botched-execution
CHINA EXECUTIONS

Injury on Angel Diaz's right arm

Diaz's right arm had a 12-by-5 inch chemical burn from the lethal drugs. Its skin had also begun to slough off when the autopsy began, revealing subcutaneous skin.

Another view of the chemical burn.

Discolored epidermis and fluid at the burn site.

The intended purpose of the thiopental was to make Diaz unconscious. Then the second drug, a paralyzing agent called pancuronium bromide, would shut down Diaz’s control of voluntary muscles. Finally, a third drug, potassium chloride, was supposed to stop his heart. According to an official state review of the execution, a member of the execution team noticed more resistance in the syringe than usual when he or she began to pump thiopental into Diaz’s left arm. This person was able to complete the dosage, and then began to administer pancuronium bromide through the same IV. The resistance grew, however, until the point where he or she could push the plunger no further. The execution team switched to the IV in Diaz’s right arm to complete the dosage of pancuronium bromide and then applied potassium chloride. When it failed to stop Diaz’s heart, the execution team administered another full cycle of the three-drug cocktail, switching back midway from his right arm to his left.

Drugs work differently subcutaneously than they do intravenously. "If thiopental infiltrates, it will not produce anesthesia," said Heath. In previous botched executions, thiopental accidentally administered subcutaneously has failed to knock prisoners unconscious: A few months before Diaz's execution, Joseph Clark, a convicted murderer in Ohio, remained awake after receiving thiopental in a collapsed vein, and executioners had to find a new vein before restarting his execution. And thiopental is the most important drug in the execution, from the prisoner’s perspective: If it fails, he will be awake to feel the torturous effects of the other two drugs. The second drug, pancuronium bromide, paralyzes the prisoner, including his diaphragm and lungs: In clinical settings, patients must be put on ventilators to continue breathing. And pancuronium bromide, unlike thiopental, works even when it’s administered subcutaneously: "Infiltrated pancuronium still accumulates in the circulation in fully effective concentrations, and so the prisoner will become 'chemically locked in' over a period of ten to twenty minutes," said Heath. The third drug, potassium chloride, is known to be painful intravenously. In order to cause cardiac arrest, a single large dose needs to hit the heart through the bloodstream—which we know didn’t happen in Diaz’s case. 

In all likelihood, Diaz remained conscious as the drugs pooled in his arms and the pancuronium bromide began to paralyze him. Diaz would have become chemically locked in—that is, mentally aware but without control of any voluntary muscles—and he would have starved for air as his diaphragm shut down and he slowly suffocated. In the autopsy report, the medical examiner noted “bilateral jugular venous distention”—an abnormal swelling of both jugular veins in Diaz’s neck that could be a sign he struggled for air. 

Witnesses to the execution reported Diaz moved throughout the procedure, suggesting he was awake and trying to overcome the onset of paralysis. Chris Tisch, a St. Petersburg Times reporter who witnessed the execution, wrote that Diaz immediately began grimacing and appeared to speak at the start (his words could not be heard by the witnesses because a glass window separates the death chamber from the viewing room). He repeatedly squinted his eyes and lifted his chin. Ten minutes into the execution—around the time he was expected to die—he turned his head to the right and began to cough. Sixteen minutes into the execution, he was still moving his mouth and chin. By the twenty-second minute, he appeared to have stopped moving—but then two minutes later his body “jolted,” according to Tisch, and his eyes opened more widely. At 6:34, a doctor checked Diaz’s vital signs. He or she left the execution chamber, returned a minute later, checked again, and at 6:36 an execution team member pronounced Diaz dead. 

Sours: https://newrepublic.com/article/117898/lethal-injection-photos-angel-diazs-botched-execution-florida

You will also like:

List of botched executions

A botched execution is defined by political science professor Austin Sarat as:

"Botched executions occur when there is a breakdown in, or departure from, the 'protocol' for a particular method of execution. The protocol can be established by the norms, expectations, and advertised virtues of each method or by the government’s officially adopted execution guidelines. Botched executions are 'those involving unanticipated problems or delays that caused, at least arguably, unnecessary agony for the prisoner or that reflect gross incompetence of the executioner.' Examples of such problems include, among other things, inmates catching fire while being electrocuted, being strangled during hangings (instead of having their necks broken), and being administered the wrong dosages of specific drugs for lethal injections."[1]


This is a list of botched executions:

List[edit]

Before 1900[edit]

  • Thomas Cromwell (1540) – Beheading by axe. Edward Hall wrote that "So paciently suffered the stroke of the axe, by a ragged and Boocherly miser, whiche very ungoodly perfourmed the office."[2]
  • Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury (1541) – The inexperienced executioner hacked at her a total of 11 times before finally decapitating her.[3]
  • Mary, Queen of Scots (1587) – Beheading by axe. The execution took three blows.[4]
  • William Russell, Lord Russell (1683) – Beheading by axe. Botched by the infamous Jack Ketch, who later wrote a letter of apology for conducting the execution poorly due to being distracted.
  • James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth (1683) – Beheading by axe. Jack Ketch took between five and eight strokes to behead him.
  • William Duell (1740) – Hanging. Survived the execution after being left hanging by the neck for around 20 minutes. Sentence commuted to transportation.
  • Arthur Elphinstone, 6th Lord Balmerino (1746) - Beheading by axe. It is said that it took three blows to behead him.
  • Joseph Samuel (1805) - Hanging. Survived three attempts to hang him. Sentence commuted to Life Imprisonment.
  • Mary Ann Cotton (1873) – Hanging. The rope was rigged too short to break her neck and she instead died slowly from strangulation.
  • Wallace Wilkerson (1879) – Firing squad. Died from bleeding 15 minutes after shots were fired but missed his heart.
  • John Babbacombe Lee (1885) – Hanging. Survived three attempts after the trapdoor of the gallows failed to open; sentence subsequently commuted to life imprisonment.
  • William Kemmler (1890) – Electric chair. The first man to be electrocuted using the electric chair, the execution took eight minutes as blood vessels under the skin ruptured and bled out.[5]

20th century[edit]

  • Tom "Black Jack" Ketchum (1901) – Hanging. The rope used was too long and he was decapitated. This was exacerbated by the fact that he had gained a considerable amount of weight while in custody prior to his execution.
  • William Williams (1906) – Hanging. He hit the floor after dropping through the trap door of the gallows. Three men had to hold his body up by the rope for over 14 minutes until Williams finally died of strangulation.
  • Wenceslao Moguel (1915) — Firing squad. He was shot nine times before a final coup de grace was performed. Survived and died at age 85 in 1976.
  • Eva Dugan (1930) – Hanging. She was decapitated by the rope.
  • Nuremberg executions (1946) – Hanging. It is likely that miscalculations may have led to the executioner using ropes that were too short for some of the executions, resulting in a failure to break the victim's neck and therefore a slower death from strangulation, although the United States Army denied this. Furthermore, the trapdoor of the gallows had been constructed so small that some of the condemned struck the sides of the trapdoor during the drop.
  • Ginggaew Lorsoongnern (1979) – Firing squad. She survived an initial round of ten shots and died after a second round of gunfire.
  • Frank J. Coppola (1982) – Electric chair. It took two 55-second jolts of electricity to kill him.
  • Jimmy Lee Gray (1983) – Gas chamber. Repeatedly banged his head into an iron bar while being gassed.[6]
  • John Louis Evans (1983) – Electric chair. Took three chargers and lasted 14 minutes, leaving his body charred and smoldering.
  • Alpha Otis Stephens (1984) – Electric chair. The first charge of two-minute, 2,080-volt electricity administered failed to kill him, and he struggled to breathe for eight minutes before a second charge carried out his death sentence.[7]
  • Stephen McCoy (1989) – Lethal injection. Had a violent reaction to the drugs which caused his chest to heave. In addition, he gasped, choked, and arched his back off the gurney. A witness fainted during the execution.
  • Jesse Tafero (1990) – Electric chair. The machine malfunctioned, causing six-inch flames to shoot out of Tafero's head. Three jolts of electricity were required to execute Tafero, in a process that took seven minutes.
  • Donald Eugene Harding (1992) – Gas chamber. His asphyxiation took 11 minutes before death was finally confirmed.
  • Pedro Medina (1997) – Electric chair. During his execution, Medina's head burst into flames and filled the chamber with smoke.
  • Allen Lee Davis (1999) – Electric chair. Bled profusely from the nose while being electrocuted, and he suffered burns to his head, leg, and groin area.

21st century[edit]

  • Joseph Lewis Clark (2006) – Lethal injection. The execution took nearly 90 minutes.
  • Ángel Nieves Díaz (2006) – Lethal injection. He needed an additional dose of drugs to be executed. The full process took approximately 34 minutes as opposed to the usual 7.5 minutes.
  • Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti (2007) – Hanging. He was decapitated as a result of an error in the calculations resulting in him being dropped too far.
  • Romell Broom (2009) – Lethal injection. Cried in pain after receiving 18 needle sticks during a 2009 botched execution that was called off after two hours.[8] A second execution was later scheduled for 2022, but he died in prison in 2020 before it could be carried out.
  • Dennis McGuire (2014) – Lethal injection. Executed using a new untried and untested lethal drug combination and took over 25 minutes to die.
  • Clayton Lockett (2014) – Lethal injection. Suffered a heart attack.
  • Joseph Wood (2014) – Lethal injection. Instead of the usual ten minutes with one dose being sufficient to kill him, he underwent a two-hour injection procedure in which he was injected with the drug cocktail 15 times.
  • Alva Campbell (2017) – Lethal injection. Executioners were unable to find a suitable vein. A second attempt was scheduled for 2019, but he died in prison from natural causes in 2018.
  • Doyle Lee Hamm (2018) – Lethal injection. Was stabbed with needles for more than two-and-a-half hours as the execution team tried to locate a suitable vein. The execution failed. The State of Alabama later agreed not to attempt to execute him again as part of a confidential settlement, thus de facto reducing his sentence to life imprisonment without parole.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Botched Executions".
  2. ^"Executions do not always go to plan - here are 8 times it went horribly wrong..."Sky HISTORY.
  3. ^"Are these the worst botched executions in history?". HistoryExtra.
  4. ^Dimuro, Gina (February 5, 2018). "The Grisly, Botched Execution Of Mary, Queen Of Scots". All That's Interesting.
  5. ^"Far Worse Than Hanging", The New York Times
  6. ^"Might we make executions more civilized, please?",From CBC news.
  7. ^Carter, Claire (November 10, 2017). "Hideous botched death row executions - including man whose head caught fire". mirror.
  8. ^"Convicted murderer Romell Broom survived one execution but he now faces a second". TheJournal.ie. Associated Press.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_botched_executions


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