Rosh hashanah 2015 meaning

Rosh hashanah 2015 meaning DEFAULT

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah (in Hebrew)

Level: Basic

  • Significance: New Year
  • Observances: Sounding the shofar (ram's horn trumpet)
  • Length: 2 Days (Some: 1 Day)
  • Customs: Dipping apples in honey; Casting off "sins" into a river
  • Greeting: L'shanah tovah! (For a good year!)
In the seventh month, on the first of the month, there shall be a sabbath for you, a remembrance with shofar blasts, a holy convocation. (Leviticus )

Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishri.

Jewish "New Year"

The name "Rosh Hashanah" means, literally, "head of the year" or "first of the year." Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. This name is somewhat deceptive, because there is little similarity between Rosh Hashanah, one of the holiest days of the year, and the American midnight drinking bash and daytime football game.

On Rosh Hashanah, we renew the crowning of G-d as sovereign of time and space (melekh ha-olam) and renew our relationship with Him with celebration and blasts of the shofar (a ram's horn trumpet). This theme is seen in the popular prayer/songs Avinu Malkeinu (Our Father, Our King, a powerful penetential prayer) and Ha-Shem Melekh, Ha-Shem Malakh, Ha-Shem Yimlokh L'Olam Va-Ed (The L-rd is King, The L-rd was King, The L-rd will be King Forever and Ever). Those songs and themes continue in the liturgy through Yom Kippur.

There is one important similarity between the Jewish New Year and the American one: Many Americans use the New Year as a time to plan a better life, making "resolutions." Likewise, the Jewish New Year is a time to begin introspection, looking back at the mistakes of the past year and planning the changes to make in the new year, continuing through the Days of Awe and Yom Kippur.

You may notice that the Bible speaks of Rosh Hashanah as occurring on the first day of the seventh month. The first month of the Jewish calendar is Nissan, occurring in March and April. Why, then, does the Jewish "new year" occur in Tishri, the seventh month?

Judaism has several different "new years," a concept which may seem strange at first, but think of it this way: the American "new year" starts in January, but the new "school year" starts in September, and many businesses have "fiscal years" that start at various times of the year. In Judaism, Nissan 1 is the new year for the purpose of counting the reign of kings and months on the calendar, Elul 1 (in August) is the new year for the tithing of animals, Shevat 15 (in February) is the new year for trees (determining when first fruits can be eaten, etc.), and Tishri 1 (Rosh Hashanah) is the new year for years (when we increase the year number. Sabbatical and Jubilee years begin at this time).

See Extra Day of Jewish Holidays for an explanation of why this holiday is celebrated for two days instead of the one day specified in the Bible.

Traditions

The name "Rosh Hashanah" is not used in the Bible to discuss this holiday. The Bible refers to the holiday as Yom Ha-Zikkaron (the day of remembrance) or Yom Teruah (the day of the sounding of the shofar). The holiday is instituted in Leviticus

The shofar is a ram's horn which is blown somewhat like a trumpet. In fact, many English bibles translate the word "shofar" as "trumpet." One of the most important observances of this holiday is hearing the sounding of the shofar in the synagogue. A total of notes are sounded each day. There are four different types of shofar notes: tekiah, a 3 second sustained note; shevarim, three 1-second notes rising in tone, teruah, a series of short, staccato notes extending over a period of about 3 seconds; and tekiah gedolah (literally, "big tekiah"), the final blast in a set, which lasts (I think) 10 seconds minimum. The YouTube video above is an amazing (and very loud!) presentation of the shofar blasts you hear in synagogue on Rosh Hashanah. The Bible gives no specific reason for this practice. One that has been suggested is that the shofar's sound is a call to repentance. The shofar is traditionally not blown if the holiday falls on Shabbat, although the traditional synagogues that observe that restriction observe the second day of Rosh Hashanah and blow the shofar on Sunday.

No work is permitted on Rosh Hashanah. Much of the day is spent in synagogue, where the regular daily liturgy is somewhat expanded. In fact, there is a special prayerbook called the machzor used for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur because of the extensive liturgical insertions for these holidays.

Another popular observance during this holiday is eating apples dipped in honey, a symbol of our wish for a sweet new year. This was the second Jewish religious practice I was ever exposed to (the first one: lighting Chanukkah candles), and I highly recommend it. It's yummy. We also dip bread in honey (instead of the usual practice of sprinkling salt on it) at this time of year for the same reason.

Another popular practice of the holiday is Tashlikh ("casting off"). We walk to flowing water, such as a creek or river, and empty our pockets into the river, symbolically casting off our sins. Small pieces of bread are commonly put in the pocket to cast off. This practice is not discussed in the Bible, but is a long-standing custom. Tashlikh is normally observed on the afternoon of the first day, before afternoon services. When the first day occurs on Shabbat, many synagogues observe Tashlikh on Sunday afternoon, to avoid carrying (the bread) on Shabbat.

Religious services for the holiday focus on the concept of G-d's sovereignty.

The common greeting at this time is L'shanah tovah ("for a good year"). This is a shortening of "L'shanah tovah tikatev v'taihatem" (or to women, "L'shanah tovah tikatevi v'taihatemi"), which means "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year." More on that concept at Days of Awe.

List of Dates

Rosh Hashanah will occur on the following days of the secular calendar:

  • Jewish Year sunset September 18, - nightfall September 20,
  • Jewish Year sunset September 6, - nightfall September 8,
  • Jewish Year sunset September 25, - nightfall September 27,
  • Jewish Year sunset September 15, - nightfall September 17,

For additional holiday dates, see Links to Jewish Calendars.


© Copyright (), Tracey R Rich
If you appreciate the many years of work I have put into this site, show your appreciation by linking to this page, not copying it to your site. I can't correct my mistakes or add new material if it's on your site. Click Here for more details.

&#x;

Sours: https://www.jewfaq.org/holiday2.htm

When is Rosh Hashanah ?

Rosh Hashanah falls on the evening of September 18, — and lasts until sundown on September

History of Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah is not mentioned in the religious text of Judaism, the Torah, but appears under various names in the Bible. Given the evidence and existing text, the holiday was well established by the sixth century B.C. ‘Rosh Hashanah’ appeared for the first time in A.D. in the Jewish code of law — Mishnah.

A new year in the Jewish calendar starts with Rosh Hashanah on the first day of the month of Tishrei, however, for religious purposes, the year begins on the first of the month of Nisan. This difference is due to the fact that God is said to have created the world on the former date. So, in a way, Rosh Hashanah is not just the start of a New Year but is also the birthday of creation. 

In addition to Rosh Hashanah, there are three other ‘New Years’ on the Jewish calendar, according to the Mishnah: Nisan 1, Elul 1, and Shevat 15, respectively. Each date has its own significance and reason for celebration. 

Tradition tells us that God passes judgment on all creatures during the time between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, known as ‘10 Days of Awe.’ Whether or not someone will continue to live or die in the coming year is determined during this time. According to Jewish law, the names of the righteous are inscribed by God in the “Book of Life” and the wicked are condemned to death on Rosh Hashanah. People have time until Yom Kippur to repent by performing ‘teshuvah,’ to tip the scales in their favor. For this reason, observant Jews consider Rosh Hashanah and the days surrounding it as a time for vigilant prayer, good deeds, reflecting on past mistakes, and making amends with others.

Rosh Hashanah timeline

70 A.D.

An Extended Holiday

Following the Second Temple of Jerusalem's destruction, Rosh Hashanah changes from a one-day event to a two-day event due to the fact that it becomes too difficult to determine the date of the new moon.

A.D.

A Formal Name

Although this holiday is considered to have been established sometime during the sixth century B.C., the phrase 'Rosh Hashanah' does not surface until the Mishnah — the book of Jewish oral laws.

s

The Word 'Challah'

Originally referred to as 'berches,' the term 'challah,' coined in Austria, appears.

s

Casting Away Sins

'Tashlikh' is the tradition of throwing items into a body of water to symbolize ridding oneself of sin.

Lots of Telegrams

The Western Union Telegraph Company reports that Jewish people send telegrams of congratulations and well-wishing much more frequently than members of any other group.

During Rosh Hashanah, Jews may take one or two days off from work, attending High Holy Day Services, gathering with family and friends, and preparing special meals. Symbolic foods include apples, honey, challah (egg bread), fish, couscous, and dates.

The High Holy Days conclude 10 days later with the Jewish calendar’s most sacred day, Yom Kippur.

Rosh Hashanah FAQs

What is Rosh Hashanah and how is it celebrated?

Jews celebrate the creation of the world on Rosh Hashanah and ask God for forgiveness for past sins. 

 

What do you eat on Rosh Hashanah?

Symbolic foods on Rosh Hashanah include fruit — especially apples — honey, challah, honey cakes, fish, vegetables like spinach and leeks, and dates. 

 

Is it okay to say Happy Rosh Hashanah?

To wish someone a happy Rosh Hashanah, ‘Shanah tovah’ is an appropriate greeting. The phrase means ‘Good year’ in Hebrew.

How to Observe Rosh Hashanah

  1. Attend synagogue services

    Because of its religious significance, Rosh Hashanah can be celebrated by attending synagogue, participating in prayers, and performing the Tashlikh — a ceremony in which bread is tossed into a body of water to symbolize the casting away of sins.

  2. Eat (the traditional way)

    Jews eat challah bread because it represents the continuity of life. They dip apples into honey to embody the hope for good health and sweetness throughout the New Year.

  3. Greet others in Hebrew

    Just as you wish a person a "Happy Birthday," or offer the sentiment of a "Happy Holidays," you can pay respect to those celebrating Rosh Hashanah by wishing them the following: “May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year" in Hebrew. Specifically, to a man you would say: “Leshanah tovah tikatev vetichatem;" and to a woman, you would say: “Leshanah tovah tikatevee vetichatemee."

5 Facts About Rosh Hashanah

  1. Enjoying exotic fruits

    It’s traditional to eat a fruit you haven’t eaten for a long time on the second night of Rosh Hashanah.

  2. Rosh Hashanah liturgy has inspired at least two songs

    The minute song ‘My Father, My King’ by the band Mogwai and Leonard Cohen’s ‘Who By Fire’ were inspired by religious liturgy.

  3. There is an annual pilgrimage

    Thousands of Hasidic Jews undertake a pilgrimage to Ukraine for ‘Kibbutz’ — the annual Rosh Hashanah gathering.

  4. It’s not the only new year

    Rosh Hashanah is one of four Jewish New Years.

  5. The traditional shofar horn smells bad

    It is commonly known that the ram’s horn blown on the holiday is very smelly.

Why Rosh Hashanah is Important

  1. A new beginning

    As the first of the Jewish High Holy Days, Rosh Hashanah is viewed as an opportunity to reset and establish the tone for the next year. During this time, people are reminded to think about their past years' experiences, practice penitence, settle any debts they may have accrued, and ask for forgiveness.

  2. A father's sacrifice

    On Rosh Hashanah, it is a custom for a shofar (ram's horn) to be blown like a trumpet. This gesture takes place in synagogue— where most of Rosh Hashanah is spent — and reminds people of the blessed event in which God allowed Abraham to sacrifice a ram instead of his son Isaac.

  3. Reflection

    Rosh Hashanah's a time to begin self-reflection, repent for their past wrongdoings, practice righteousness, and set new goals.

Sours: https://nationaltoday.com/rosh-hashanah/
  1. Midwest labs price list
  2. 1997 ford ranger oil capacity
  3. Tuxedo rentals in mooresville nc
  4. 18 inch low ponytail
  5. Best marksman rifle loadout warzone

Rosh Hashanah &#; Beginning of the Year

Leshon Ima, Mother Tongue with Dr. Rachel Zohar Dulin, Special To The Dayton Jewish Observer

Like every year at this season, we observe the fall holidays starting with Rosh Hashanah, the first day of the Jewish year, continuing with the observance of Yom Kippur and ending with the happy celebrations of Sukkot and Simchat Torah.

Rosh Hashanah, which conjures a mood of contemplation and self-examination, gives the tone to the observance of the holidays.

It sets the stage to a short, yet intensive period of a personal spiritual voyage, which leads to teshuvah, the returning to faith and forgiveness.

Dr. Rachel Zohar Dulin

The name Rosh Hashanah befits the day which begins the year. The first word, rosh, means head or beginning.

There are many terms in Hebrew where rosh is at the head. For example, rosh chodesh means the beginning of the month, and rosh memshalah the head of the government, the prime minister.

Yoshev rosh is a chairman and keev rosh is a headache. Koved rosh, literally heavy head, implies seriousness and kalut rosh, light-mindedness, implies frivolity.

The second word, shanah, means year. It is based in the verb shanah meaning change and may have originally referred to the change of seasons.

Shanah, too, is at the center of many concepts. For example, shanah beshanah means annually, yom hashanah means anniversary, and luach shannah means calendar.

Beginnings are often marked with ritual. A ritual that comes to mind related to Rosh Hashanah is tekiat shofar, the blowing of the shofar, an ancient wind instrument made of a ram’s horn.

The word shofar is related to the Akkadian word sapparu meaning wild goat. The shofar is blown in the synagogue many times during the autumn holidays, reminiscent of the biblical custom to declare a holiday season (Lev. ).

It is also a reminder of the biblical Yom T’ruah, the day of blowing the shofar, the antecedent to Rosh Hashanah, which was observed on the first day of the seventh month of the biblical calendar (Num. ).

Last but not least, the observance of Rosh Hashanah brings to mind the prayer and the hope to be inscribed in Sefer Hachayim, the Book of Life, for a good and healthy life.

The reference to this celestial book was already mentioned in the Bible (Ps. ), but not in connection with the new year.

It is only later in Jewish tradition the hope to be inscribed in Sefer Hachayim became an integral part of the holiday supplications.

The traditional blessing l’shannah tova tikatevu, may you be inscribed to a good year, is rooted in this hope.

Dr. Rachel Zohar Dulin is a professor of biblical literature at Spertus College in Chicago and an adjunct professor of Bible and Hebrew at New College of Florida.

To read the complete September Dayton Jewish Observer, click here.

Sours: https://daytonjewishobserver.org//08/rosh-hashanah-beginning-of-the-year/
Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashana / רֹאשׁ הַשָּׁנָה

Rosh Hashana (The Jewish New Year) for Hebrew Year begins at sundown on and ends at nightfall on .

Rosh Hashanah (Hebrew: ראש השנה), (literally "head of the year"), is the Jewish New Year. It is the first of the High Holidays or Yamim Noraim ("Days of Awe"), celebrated ten days before Yom Kippur. Rosh Hashanah is observed on the first two days of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. It is described in the Torah as יום תרועה (Yom Teru'ah, a day of sounding [the Shofar]).
Read more from Judaism  → or Wikipedia →

Advertisement

Dates for Rosh Hashana

HolidayStartsEndsHebrew Dates
Rosh Hashana Tishrei
Rosh Hashana Tishrei
Rosh Hashana Tishrei
Rosh Hashana Tishrei
Rosh Hashana Tishrei
Rosh Hashana Tishrei
Rosh Hashana Tishrei
Rosh Hashana Tishrei

Tanakh

Rosh Hashana I / רֹאשׁ הַשָּׁנָה א׳

Torah Portion: Genesis ; Numbers

  1. 1: Genesis · 4 p’sukim·
  2. 2: Genesis · 8 p’sukim·
  3. 3: Genesis · 9 p’sukim·
  4. 4: Genesis · 6 p’sukim·
  5. 5: Genesis · 7 p’sukim·
  6. maf: Numbers · 6 p’sukim·

Haftarah: I Samuel - · 38 p’sukim

Rosh Hashana I (on Shabbat) / רֹאשׁ הַשָּׁנָה יוֹם א׳ (בְּשַׁבָּת)

Torah Portion: Genesis ; Numbers

  1. 1: Genesis · 4 p’sukim·
  2. 2: Genesis · 4 p’sukim·
  3. 3: Genesis · 4 p’sukim·
  4. 4: Genesis · 5 p’sukim·
  5. 5: Genesis · 4 p’sukim·
  6. 6: Genesis · 6 p’sukim·
  7. 7: Genesis · 7 p’sukim·
  8. maf: Numbers · 6 p’sukim·

Haftarah: I Samuel - · 38 p’sukim

Rosh Hashana II / רֹאשׁ הַשָּׁנָה ב׳

Torah Portion: Genesis ; Numbers

  1. 1: Genesis · 3 p’sukim·
  2. 2: Genesis · 5 p’sukim·
  3. 3: Genesis · 6 p’sukim·
  4. 4: Genesis · 5 p’sukim·
  5. 5: Genesis · 5 p’sukim·
  6. maf: Numbers · 6 p’sukim·

Haftarah: Jeremiah - · 19 p’sukim

References

The Jewish Holidays: A Guide & Commentary(paid link)
Rabbi Michael Strassfeld
Sefaria Tanakh
Sefaria.org
Tanakh: The Holy Scriptures(paid link)
Jewish Publication Society
"Rosh Hashanah" in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia
Wikimedia Foundation Inc.
Sours: https://www.hebcal.com/holidays/rosh-hashana

2015 meaning hashanah rosh

Rosh Hashanah Guide

Shanah Tova and Happy New Year!

The Fall Holidays are a time of celebration and renewal, of introspection and repentance, of giving and receiving forgiveness, of family and friends and being connected to the local and worldwide Jewish community. We take time to enjoy the celebrations while remembering the true importance of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur — that we all make mistakes but can take time to correct them and ask for forgiveness. How wonderful when you can say, “I am sorry,” and hear someone answer, “I forgive you.”

Tap below to hear the sounds of the Shofar

Click below to hear the sounds of the Shofar

Tekiah Gedolah
תק&#;עה גדולה

Rosh Hashanah

ראש השנה

räsh-(h)ə-ˈshä-nə &#;

The “Head of the Year” begins the Ten Days of Atonement. Also known as Yom Teruah, the Day of Sounding the Shofar; Yom Hazikaron, the Day of Remembering; and Yom Hadin, the Day of Judgement.

Yom Kippur

יום כפור

yōm-ki-ˈpu̇r &#;

A day of repentance when Jews everywhere look to be sealed in the Book of Life. The day carries a special power to cleanse the mistakes of the Jewish people, both individually and collectively.

Start the New Year Right

Here’s a list of ritual items to welcome in the Jewish year.
Mouse over each item to learn more.

Sweet Challah and Challah Cover

For Rosh Hashanah, we traditionally eat a round challah with raisins baked in it. The round shape symbolizes the cycle of life, which we are highly aware at this time. The raisins symbolize sweetness for the new year ahead. To make it even sweeter, we dip the challah in honey.

Sweet Challah and Challah Cover

For Rosh Hashanah, we traditionally eat a round challah with raisins baked in it. The round shape symbolizes the cycle of life, which we are highly aware at this time. The raisins symbolize sweetness for the new year ahead. To make it even sweeter, we dip the challah in honey.

Apples and Honey

We dip apples in honey to signify our wish for a sweet new year. The apple, in addition to being a primary fruit of the season, symbolizes the Shechinah, the Divine Presence, which is often referred to as an apple orchard in kabbalistic literature. The apple also recalls the initial understanding of right and wrong in the Garden of Eden and reminds us that we have the choice to choose between the two.

Apples and Honey

We dip apples in honey to signify our wish for a sweet new year. The apple, in addition to being a primary fruit of the season, symbolizes the Shechinah, the Divine Presence, which is often referred to as an apple orchard in kabbalistic literature. The apple also recalls the initial understanding of right and wrong in the Garden of Eden and reminds us that we have the choice to choose between the two.

Honey Cake and Other Sweets

Honey cake and other sweet treats are eaten at our festive Rosh Hashanah meals to symbolize our wish for a sweet new year.

Honey Cake and Other Sweets

Honey cake and other sweet treats are eaten at our festive Rosh Hashanah meals to symbolize our wish for a sweet new year.

Candles and Candle Sticks

Candles are lit before sunset to usher in the holiday, and beautiful candle sticks visually and spiritually enhance the mitzvah of lighting the candles.

Candles and Candle Sticks

Candles are lit before sunset to usher in the holiday, and beautiful candle sticks visually and spiritually enhance the mitzvah of lighting the candles.

Kiddush Cup and Wine or Grape Juice

We sanctify the holiday by reciting kiddush over wine or grape juice.

Kiddush Cup and Wine or Grape Juice

We sanctify the holiday by reciting kiddush over wine or grape juice.

A Machzor, High Holiday Prayer Book

A special prayer book is used on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur for the services we complete on those days and includes piyyutim, liturgical poems.

A Machzor, High Holiday Prayer Book

A special prayer book is used on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur for the services we complete on those days and includes piyyutim, liturgical poems.

A Special First Fruit

A round fruit, not yet eaten that season, is tasted on the second night of Rosh Hashanah to make sure that the second day of the holiday has something new about it so that we can say the Shehechiyanu, a prayer of thanksgiving thanksgiving for a special or new experience.

A Special First Fruit

A round fruit, not yet eaten that season, is tasted on the second night of Rosh Hashanah to make sure that the second day of the holiday has something new about it so that we can say the Shehechiyanu, a prayer of thanksgiving thanksgiving for a special or new experience.

White Table Cloth

The color white traditionally symbolizing purity and new beginnings, so it’s fitting to set our new year’s table with linens that signify a fresh start.

White Table Cloth

The color white traditionally symbolizing purity and new beginnings, so it’s fitting to set our new year’s table with linens that signify a fresh start.

Sneakers

In addition to fasting on Yom Kippur, there are several things we abstain from, which include but are not limited to bathing, using perfume or cologne and wearing leather shoes. Thus, non-leather sneakers have become the Yom Kippur footwear of choice in many Jewish communities.

Sneakers

In addition to fasting on Yom Kippur, there are several things we abstain from, which include but are not limited to bathing, using perfume or cologne and wearing leather shoes. Thus, non-leather sneakers have become the Yom Kippur footwear of choice in many Jewish communities.

What’s for dinner?

Sure, there are apples dipped in honey, round challah and honey cake, but beyond all the treats that symbolize a sweet new year, there are many other foods that take on a spiritual meaning during the High Holidays. Tap below to see a few foods you can incorporate into your holiday meals this year.Click below to see a few foods you can incorporate into your holiday meals this year.

  • Squash, Pumpkins and Gourds

    The word for squash, kera, is phonetically related to the Hebrew words to “to rip/tear” and “to read.” We hope that any bad things we have done will be ripped from G-d’s book. And we say, “May You tear up our negative judgement,” or “May You read our good merits.”

  • Pomegranate

    Every pomegranate, it is said, has exactly seeds, precisely the number of mitzvot. As we eat this fruit, we pray that the coming year will be filled with as many good deeds as the pomegranate has seeds. We say, “In the coming year, may we be rich and replete with acts inspired by religion and piety as this pomegranate is rich and replete with seeds.”

  • Leeks

    In Aramaic, the word for leeks is karsi, which sounds like yikarsu, the word for “cut off” or “destroy.” We eat leeks in hopes that our misdeeds and spiritual enemies will be cut down.

  • Dates

    Tamarim, or dates, sounds like the Hebrew word sheyitamu, which means “May they be consumed.” Guess who we wish to be consumed? You got it, our enemies. But in English speaking countries we also eat dates as a way to say, “May we date the new year as a beginning of happiness and blessing and peace for all people.”

  • Beets

    In Aramaic, the word for beet is silka similar to the Hebrew word salak, which means to “go away.” We eat beets to express our hope that our enemies will disappear.

  • Sheep or Fish Head

    Rosh Hashanah literally means “head of the year.” The sheep or fish head symbolizes the hope that each of us will be at the head of whatever we do, rather than at the tail end.

  • Carrots

    For Sephardic Jews, carrots are symbolic of the phrase yikaretu oyveychem, which means “May your enemies be cut down.” We ask that those who wish bad things for us do not get their wish. For Ashkenazi Jews, carrots symbolize the Yiddish word merren, which means “more.” We want more of all the good things in life — more health, more happiness, more success.

Get punny!

When planning your Rosh Hashanah menu, get creative and develop your own English puns. You might try peas in hopes of increased peace. Get it? Or maybe your salad says “Lettuce find happiness in this new year.” And don’t forget to say “Olive you” to friends and family. Get family and friends involved and have fun creating your own puns and building a menu around your newly symbolic foods.

Tradition

Time spent in prayer and festive family meals are often what first come to mind when thinking about the High Holidays. But there are many traditions that bring meaning to this auspicious time of year. Consider taking on a new family tradition, or if you already practice one of the traditions suggested below, think about inviting friends and other family members to join you!

Tashlich

Tashlich is the service when we symbolically cast our sins into a running body of water in hopes that the water will carry our sins away. The practice is based on a verse from the book of the Prophet Michah that says, “And thou wilt cast all your sins into the depths of the sea.”

Kaparot

Kaparot is a ritual done by taking a live chicken (don’t worry, you can also use money) and waving it around your head three times. The chicken is then slaughtered and given to charity, or if you go with the money option, the money is donated. While swinging the chicken (or money) above your head, say “This is my exchange, this is my substitute, this is my atonement. This chicken is going to die (or this money is going to be given away), but I am going to a good, long life and to peace.”

Tshuvah Tracker

Doing tshuvah, a word often translated to “repentance” but literally meaning “return” is something we focus on in the month of Elul before the holidays actually begin in Tishrei. As a family, sit and and make a plan of ways to make the New Year better. Asking the following questions is a great way to start thinking about self improvement for the year to come: What have I done wrong? What do I need to apologize for? What can I change for the better?

Wearing White

White is a symbol of purity, cleanliness and new beginnings. Because of this symbolism, many Jews wear white clothing during Rosh Hashanah. Some people wear a kittle, a white robe that is similar to a Jewish burial shroud and reminds us of our mortality. Another explanation for wearing white is that it emulates the ministering angels that surround us during this time.

Sours: https://myjewishdetroit.org//09/01/rosh-hashanah-guide/
What is Rosh Hashanah in 7 minutes?

Why Rosh Hashanah kicks off the Jewish New Year in the Autumn—not January

Food, sound, prayer, reflection, celebration. Jewish people around the world will wish one another “Shanah tovah” (Hebrew for “good year”) during Rosh Hashanah, the observance of the Jewish New Year. Here’s what you need to know about the holiday, which took place this year between sundown on September 18 and sundown on September 20 and kicks off the Jewish high holy days.

Origins and meaning of Rosh Hashanah

Jewish people welcome the new year in September or October, not January, in observance of the lunisolar Hebrew calendar. Rosh Hashanah begins on the first day of Tishri, the first month of the calendar’s civil year and seventh month of its religious year. Given that the Hebrew calendar is more than a week shorter than the Gregorian calendar and, according to tradition, originated with the biblical creation of the universe, this holiday will mark the beginning of the year for Jews worldwide.

Hebrew for “head of the year,” Rosh Hashanah is a chance not just to celebrate and look ahead, but to consider the past and review one’s relationship with God. It also marks the first day of a period known as the TenDays of Awe, or Days of Repentance, during which a person’s actions are thought to be able to influence both God’s judgment and God’s plan for that person. These high holy days culminate in Yom Kippur, a time of atonement that is considered the holiest day of the year.

Though the holiday has been celebrated for thousands of years, its origins are murky. Jewish scripturelays out the month and days of a similar festival but does not call it Rosh Hashanah. In the biblical passage Leviticus , God tells Moses that the people of Israel should observe the first day of the seventh month as a day of rest and mark it with the blast of horns.

At some point, the horn-blowing holiday became associated with the new year. The earliest reference to Rosh Hashanah in a rabbinic text comes from the Mishnah, a Jewish legal text that dates from A.D.

How Rosh Hashanah is celebrated

In the leadup to Rosh Hashanah, the shofar—a trumpet made from a ram or kosher animal’s horn—is regularly sounded in synagogues. The holiday itself is celebrated with even more shofar blasts, usually a hundred during the services on both days. Many Jews interpret the sound as a call to repent of sins and seek forgiveness from God.

Work is prohibited on Rosh Hashanah, and many Jewish people spend the holiday attending special services at their synagogues and then celebrating with festive meals.

Rosh Hashanah has its own symbolic foods: round challah, apples, and honey. Symbolising God, the cycles of the year, and the sustenance that lies ahead, a rounded challah loaf, often studded with raisins, is usually dipped in honey and eaten in a celebratory meal. So are apples, which represent hope for a sweet year ahead. The tradition of eating apples for Rosh Hashanah is thought to have originated with Ashkenazi Jews in Europe who used the fall fruit in their new year’s meals. (See nine breads from around the world.)

So how will the beginning of the year be celebrated in a time like no other? In many places worldwide, synagogue attendance and family meals are still impossible due to the coronavirus. But some believers are getting creative. In Washington, D.C., for example, synagogues and Jewish organisations came up with a pandemic plan,writes Matt Blitz for DCist. At 5 p.m. on September 18, hundreds of people around the city blew their shofars outside in a simultaneous show of new year’s devotion. 

Sours: https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/history-and-civilisation//09/why-rosh-hashanah-kicks-off-the-jewish-new-year-in-the-autumn-not

You will also like:

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashana begins Monday night September 6th, through Tuesday (Sept. 7) and Wednesday (Sept. 8).

Q. Rosh Hashana, in addition to being the Day of Judgment, is also Rosh Chodesh, the first day of the month Tishrei. Why is there no mention in the prayers that it&#;s also Rosh Chodesh?

A. When the king visits a city together with his ministers, all the attention is given to the king. It would be disrespectful to the king if we diverted our attention from the king and gave special attention to his ministers while in the king&#;s presence.  

Rosh Hashana is the day when we crown G-d as King of the universe. On Rosh Chodesh we pay special tribute to the reappearance of the new moon. Thus, it is not befitting that on the day when we accept and recognize G-d as King of the universe to also focus on one of His subjects and pay tribute to the reappearance of the moon. For this reason, the prayers of Rosh Chodesh are omitted.

Q. Why does the date for Rosh Hashana vary from year to year?

A. Rosh Hashana will vary from year to year only on the secular calendar. However, it is always on the same day in the Hebrew calendar &#; on the first day of the Hebrew month, Tishrei.

The reason it varies on the secular calendar is that the Hebrew calendar, which is lunar based, has around days in the year. However, the secular calendar, which is solar based, has days.

In order to keep the Jewish holidays in their proper seasons (Passover in the spring, etc.) adjustments are made in the Hebrew calendar. Every few years an extra Hebrew month is added, thus making it a month year. In that case the Hebrew calendar will be over days. But on average it has just over days.

Thus, the Hebrew holidays, which are established by the Hebrew calendar, are different on the secular calendar from year to year.

Q.   Why did the Torah set the first of Tishrei as Rosh Hashana &#; beginning of the New Year?

A. Rosh Hashana is celebrated on the sixth day of creation, the day in which Adam and Eve were created. The upkeep of the universe and fulfilling G-d&#;s purpose for His creation depends on mankind. It teaches us the special merit and at the same time the great responsibility we all have in making this world a better place.

The holiday of Rosh Hashana is unique in that it is celebrated two days in Israel just as in the Diaspora.

The first night of Rosh Hashana, we wish each other &#;L&#;shana Tova Tikateivu Vtaichateimu&#; &#; &#;May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year.&#;

We don&#;t wish the same on the second night. The reason is because the Talmud tells us that, &#;The righteous people are immediately inscribed on the first day of Rosh Hashana, for good life.&#; To demonstrate that we consider everyone righteous, we wish &#;L&#;shana Tova&#; only the first day. To wish someone the same on the second night or day, would mean that we are in doubt whether they are righteous. It teaches us how careful we must be to view others in a positive way, especially on Rosh Hashana.

On Rosh Hashana, we eat different foods to symbolize our prayers for a sweet year. For this reason, we dip the Challa and apple in honey. We also eat foods which symbolize good things. For example, many people eat part of the head of a fish and declare, &#;May we, this year, be at the head!&#; In other words, we should be on top and not on the bottom.

Listening to the blowing of the Shofar on Rosh Hashana is a very important mitzvah. The sound of the Shofar on Rosh Hashana serves as a wake up call to return to G-d, for the sound of the Shofar reminds us that Rosh Hashana is the Day of Judgment.

Also, on Rosh Hashana we proclaim G-d as the King of the universe. At the coronation of a king, it is customary to blow trumpets. Through blowing the Shofar we declare G-d King of the universe.

 

Q. Why is it customary that the Rosh Hashana challahs (bread) are shaped round?

A. The round challah symbolizes the shape of the universe and remind us that the world is judged on this day. It also resembles the shape of a crown. This signifies that on this day we crown G-d as the king of the universe, as mentioned above.

Q. Aside from the practical application, is there any significance in the fact that the Shofar is blown from the narrow end while the wide end of the Shofar is pointing upward?

A. One of the verses from the Psalms recited before the sounding of the Shofar is, &#;Out of distress I called to G-d; with abounding relief, G-d answered me.&#;

The narrow side of the Shofar through which we blow represents our call of distress while the wide end of the Shofar represents G-d&#;s answering our call of distress with abounding relief.

HAVE A VERY GOOD, HAPPY, HEALTHY AND SUCCESSFUL DAY AND SHANA TOVA

 

On the first day of Rosh Hashana, after the Mincha service, it is customary to go to a body of water &#; a lake, river or stream that has fish in it and perform the Tashlich service.

Tashlich means &#;cast away&#;. The Tashlich service consists of different verses from the Bible and Psalms. After reciting the Tashlich service, we shake out our pockets (or the corners of our garments) over the water. This symbolizes the words of the prophet Micha: &#;And thou shall throw into the depth of the sea all your sins.&#;

Q. What is the symbolic significance of throwing away our sins at a body of water on Rosh Hashana?

A. The Midrash tells us that when Abraham went to offer Isaac as a sacrifice, Satan tried to intervene. So he put a river in their way to block their path. Abraham and Isaac continued walking, right into the river. When the water reached their necks, Abraham exclaimed, &#;Save us O Lord, for the waters have come to take my soul.&#; At that point, G-d ordered Satan to remove the obstruction. Tashlich, like many other Rosh Hashana customs, commemorates the acts of our forefathers. By reciting Tashlich near water, we recall the self-sacrifice of Abraham and Isaac and ask G-d to apply their merit in our favor.

Another reason: In Biblical times, it was the custom to anoint every king near a body of water so that his rule might flow smoothly and continuously like a river. Similarly, we say Tashlich by water for it is a time when we proclaim G-d as King of the universe.

Q. What is the significance of having fish in the water?

A. The reason we try to find a river that has fish for Tashlich: Fish have no eyelids, their eyes are always open. In the same way, we ask Hashem who, &#;neither sleeps nor slumbers&#; (Psalms ) to watch over us continuously and bless us and our loved ones with a happy, healthy, and sweet year.

During the Middle Ages, ignorant peasants used the custom of Tashlich as an excuse for a pogrom against Jews. They claimed that Jews were casting a spell over the water or even poisoning it. As a result, the Rabbis would at times prohibit the practice of Tashlich for fear that Jewish lives would be endangered! Today, we can all celebrate this wonderful custom. If you cannot get to water on Rosh Hashana, you can perform the custom even after Rosh Hashana.

Q. Why is the Torah reading on the first day of Rosh Hashana about the miraculous birth of our patriarch Yitzchak (Isaac)?

A. Yitzchak was born on Pesach years before the Exodus. He was born on the day that G-d would choose to take the Jewish people out of Egypt years later. It was on Rosh Hashana that Sarah, at the age of 90, became pregnant with Yitzchak. Thus, we read about this miracle on Rosh Hashana.

Every Holiday has its unique mitzvah. The special mitzvah on Rosh Hashana is the blowing of the shofar. It is preferable that the shofar be made of a ram&#;s horn.

Q. What is the reason for blowing the Shofar on Rosh Hashana?

A. One reason is to recall the Giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai. The Torah tells us that at the Giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, there was thunder and lighting and the sound of the Shofar.

Q. What connection does the Giving of the Torah have with Rosh Hashana &#; the day of judgment?

A. Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Barditchev gives the following parable: A king became lost in a forest. He wandered deeper and deeper in the woods, until he lost all hope of ever seeing his beautiful palace again. One day, he suddenly met a man who knew the way out of the forest and who helped him back to his kingdom and palace.

The king rewarded the man very generously and made him one of his closest friends. One day, the man sinned against the king. Knowing that he was about to be severely punished, the man asked of the king to grant him one wish&#;that he be allowed to wear the same clothes that he wore when he saved the king. The king agreed. As soon as the king looked at him, he remembered how the man saved his life. Immediately, this invoked feelings of affection by the king and he forgave the sinner and restored him to his position.

The same is with the Jewish people, when they stand before G-d in judgment on Rosh Hashana. When G-d wanted to give the Torah He approached many nations, but no other nation was willing to accept the restrictions and responsibility of the Torah and mitzvot. Only the Jewish people accepted the Torah and crowned G-d as their king. Sounding the Shofar on Rosh Hashana recalls the Giving of the Torah when the Jewish people were there for G-d. So too, we pray that G-d remember our merit and be merciful upon us to grant us a happy and healthy New Year.

Q.   Why is a ram&#;s horn used for the Shofar?

A. Another reason for the sounding of the shofar on Rosh Hashana is to recall the merit of our patriarch Abraham who passed his tenth test when he was ready to sacrifice his son, Isaac, on the altar. In the end G-d told him it was only a test and he sacrificed a ram instead.

On Rosh Hashana, the day of judgment, we need as many merits as possible to invoke G-d&#;s mercy on His children. By sounding the Shofar made of a ram, we recall Abraham and Isaac&#;s merit for their total dedication to G-d&#;s commandments. We pray that in their merit, G-d will grant us, their descendants, a good, healthy and sweet year.

 

 

 

Sours: https://jcscc.org/rosh-hashanah/


1203 1204 1205 1206 1207