Cars com toyota 4runner

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Be Smart, Check in Advance. CARFAX — Your Vehicle History.

CARFAX — Your Vehicle History Expert

Sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but that's not the case when buying a used car. As an independent vehicle history provider, at CARFAX we've made it our mission to tell you everything you need to know by uncovering as many events as possible from the previous life of a used car. Our primary goal is to help you get to know your next car from the inside out before deciding to make an investment that will be part of you and your family's everyday life. We believe your next car shouldn't be hiding anything from you.

CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

But more than anything else, we don't want you or your family unknowingly sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle that isn't 100% safe. This is why we strive to take these vehicles off the road, which not only makes the used car market safer but our streets safer too.

CARFAX — 35+ Years of Experience in Vehicle Histories

CARFAX was founded in the US in 1984 and expanded into Europe in 2007. Around 100 team members spread across six European offices process vehicle information from 22 countries.

Fostering strategic partnerships with registration authorities, law enforcement agencies, government departments, insurance companies, inspection centers and numerous other leading companies around the world has enabled us to compile a unique international database for vehicle histories. We use this database to help make the used car market more transparent. We give everyone in the process of buying a used car access to what is currently the world's most comprehensive source for vehicle history reports, and is growing day by day.

We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Used-Toyota-4Runner_w628

The 2020 Jeep Gladiator and the 2019 Toyota 4Runner may not be very similar in form. One is a less-than-full-size convertible pickup, and the other is a mid-size SUV. But when life's trials push you to bug out of town for safety or to just get away to more peaceful pastures, one of these rugged, off-road-friendly ruffians is what you want parked in your driveway. Be it fleeing zombies, a flood, or an impending visit from your in-laws, these overland-ready utilitarians are built to tackle less trodden paths while loaded with gear—and to look good while doing it—without entirely sacrificing on-road drivability. How do they stack up?

The Matchup

The all-new Gladiator clearly is a beefed-up four-door Jeep Wrangler JL with a cargo bed. Despite its freshness on the market, it is arguably one of few vehicles that can make Toyota's current 4Runner seem modern. With its front and rear live axles and design cues that trace back to World War II, the Gladiator is an anachronism that has been meticulously fussed over to operate far better in day-to-day use than it has any right to. And you can remove its roof and doors and fold its windshield down flat, which spikes its driver's cool factor better than a selfie with Keanu Reeves. The Gladiator's inherent compromises limited it to third place in our most recent comparison test of compact pickups. The 4Runner fared only slightly better in its last comparison test, back during Obama's first term, when it finished second to the Jeep Grand Cherokee.

That Toyota sold about 140,000 4Runners last year speaks to the solid fan base that this SUV has cultivated over the years. Like the Jeep, the 4Runner's body is mounted atop a separate ladder-type frame, diminishing its packaging efficiency in favor of a tougher build. It only has a live axle at the back, and its control-arm front suspension and conventional SUV layout make it feel less like a novelty on the road than the Jeep. Its 270-hp 4.0-liter V-6 is a decent match for the Gladiator's 285-hp 3.6-liter V-6. Both of these vehicles have a maximum passenger count of five, yet the Toyota's 5000-pound towing capacity falls well short of the Jeep's 7650-pound rating.

The 4Runner starts at $35,905 in rear-drive SR5 form; four-wheel-drive models begin at $37,780; and it's possible to exceed $50K on the top Limited Nightshade 4WD model. Given its antiquity, the Toyota cannot be had with certain active safety features, such as front and rear automated emergency braking and adaptive cruise control, that are available on the newer Jeep. While pricing for the four-wheel-drive-only Gladiator opens at a similarly reasonable $35,040, its breadth of optional equipment makes it easy to inflate that figure massively. Witness our $55,040 test vehicle, and that's only a mid-level Overland model.

On the Road

Stellar road manners are not included with either of these vehicles. These are old-school trucks with chunky transfer-case shift levers poking up through the floorboards. Their responses are vague, performance is modest, and their rides are often choppy, particularly the Gladiator's. Both are adequately quick—zero to 60 mph takes 7.3 seconds in the Jeep and 7.7 in the Toyota—yet their soft suspensions and tall-sidewall tires combine to make them feel ponderous on the road. The 4Runner is particularly lethargic due to its hefty steering and five-speed automatic transmission. In contrast, the intelligent action of the Jeep's optional $2000 ZF eight-speed automatic (a six-speed manual is standard!) works well to make the most of the V-6's 260 lb-ft of torque. Along with the Gladiator's better low-speed maneuverability and—thanks in large part to its sprawling 137.3-inch wheelbase—good-for-a-Wrangler stability at higher speeds, this is the Wrangler that non-Jeepers will find the most tolerable.

Both the 4Runner and the Gladiator are heavy at about 4800 pounds and push large amounts of air, making them similarly thirsty at the pump; both of our test vehicles averaged less than 20 mpg. With lots of ground clearance and two-speed transfer cases, both vehicles offer significant capability when the pavement ends, although the Gladiator's 27.5-inch-longer wheelbase means that it's a bit large for some trails, and it will often scrape its belly over obstacles. Our 4Runner TRD Off Road Premium's abilities were bolstered by the $1750 Kinetic Dynamic Suspension system that hydraulically manages body roll, giving the car increased wheel articulation while off-roading. Both models offer more extreme off-road variants in the 4Runner TRD Pro and the Gladiator Rubicon.

The Inside View

These two vehicles share few similarities on the inside, save for both sitting rather tall in the saddle, making it cumbersome to climb in and out. Passenger space in the first and second rows of seats is slightly better in the Gladiator (104 cubic feet to the 4Runner's 96), yet the upright cabin can make it feel more compact than it actually is. Aside from some initially funky ergonomics, such as the shallow dashboard and the centrally located window switches, the more contemporary Jeep also gets the nod for materials and electronics, including Fiat Chrysler's excellent 8.4-inch Uconnect touchscreen interface. The Toyota will seem more familiar to any SUV driver, and all of its controls are intuitively arranged, but its plastics and switchgear look and feel cheap, and its 6.1-inch center touchscreen is in need of a big upgrade. While power outlets and connectivity options are plentiful in both vehicles, there's no mistaking that the Jeep design is a decade newer.

Six-footers will find similar levels of comfort in the back seat of either vehicle, although the Gladiator's seatbacks are a bit more upright than we'd like, and the rear door aperture has a narrowing cutline at the bottom that makes it an effort to squeeze through. Folding down the rear seats makes little difference in its versatility, although there is that five-foot bed out back that's perfect for large, grungy items. In addition to a spacious 47 cubic feet of secure cargo space, the back end of the Toyota also houses several of the 4Runner's niftiest features: an available third row of seats on certain models ($1365); an optional—and convenient—slide-out cargo floor ($350, reduces cargo volume by one cubic foot); and the standard power rear window, which, in practice, is more entertaining than it is useful.

The Bottom Line

Aside from their distinct personalities and different cargo layouts, what truly separate the Jeep Gladiator and the Toyota 4Runner are the intangibles. The 4Runner, while highly capable, simply drives like the old SUV that it is. The Gladiator, for all of its even more antiquated design foibles, brings a sense of occasion to its use, and that's before you remove its roof and doors. That novelty, combined with a solid execution that improves upon the on-road composure of the newly redesigned JL Wrangler, helped the Gladiator make partial converts out of several drivers previously indifferent to the seven-slot grille. While the Gladiator is far from perfect—and downright expensive if you get happy with the options and accessories—it's the type of fun we'd want to bring along when heading for the hills.

Specifications

SPECIFICATIONS

2020 Jeep Gladiator Overland 4x4

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, rear/4-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door pickup

PRICE AS TESTED
$55,040 (base price: $41,890)

ENGINE TYPE
DOHC 24-valve V-6, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection

Displacement
220 cu in, 3605 cc
Power
285 hp @ 6400 rpm
Torque
260 lb-ft @ 4400 rpm

TRANSMISSION
8-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): live axle/live axle
Brakes (F/R): 13.0-in vented disc/13.6-in vented disc
Tires: Bridgestone Dueler H/T 685, 255/70R-18 113T M+S  

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 137.3 in
Length: 218.0 in
Width: 73.8 in
Height: 73.1 in
Passenger volume: 104 cu ft
Curb weight: 4812 lb

C/D
TEST RESULTS
Zero to 60 mph: 7.3 sec
Zero to 90 mph: 16.2 sec
Zero to 100 mph: N/A
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 7.8 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 3.6 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 5.2 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 15.6 sec @ 88 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 98 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 195 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad*: 0.74 g
*stability-control-inhibited

C/D
FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 18 mpg
75-mph highway driving: 21 mpg
Highway range: 460 miles

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 19/17/22 mpg 

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road Premium 4WD

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, rear/4-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door hatchback

PRICE AS TESTED
$44,473 (base price: $40,740)

ENGINE TYPE
DOHC 24-valve V-6, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection

Displacement
241 cu in, 3956 cc
Power
270 hp @ 5600 rpm
Torque
278 lb-ft @ 4400 rpm

TRANSMISSION
5-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): control arms/live axle
Brakes (F/R): 13.3-in vented disc/12.3-in vented disc
Tires: Bridgestone Dueler H/T 684 II, 265/70R-17 113S M+S

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 109.8 in
Length: 191.3 in
Width: 75.8 in
Height: 71.5 in
Passenger volume: 96 cu ft
Cargo volume: 47 cu ft
Curb weight: 4796 lb

C/D
TEST RESULTS
Zero to 60 mph: 7.7 sec
Zero to 90 mph: 16.6 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 21.3 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 8.1 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.0 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 4.7 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 16.0 sec @ 88 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 114 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 194 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.76 g

C/D
FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 17 mpg
75-mph highway driving: 22 mpg
Highway range: 500 miles

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 18/17/20 mpg 

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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/comparison-test/a28370192/2020-jeep-gladiator-vs-2019-toyota-4runner/
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2022 4Runner

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4Runner Specials

Discover local specials and limited time offers today.

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Captain of the off-road.

Prices and colors may vary by model.

{ "year": "2022", "series": "4runner", "colorCode": "8S6", "grade": "sr5", "trim": "8664", "imageIndex": "2", "imageBackground": "white", "imagePath": "https://www.toyota.

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Corolla Hatchback Specials

Discover local specials and limited time offers today.

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TRD Sport

Grab your gear and hit the road running in the all-new TRD Sport.

Locking Rear Differential

Keep a steady pace over obstacles with power evenly distributed to both rear wheels.

Crawl Control

Automatically modulating the throttle and brakes, this advanced system helps you traverse tough terrain.

Trail Special Edition

Outfitted with a removable 40-qt. cooler and Yakima® LoadWarrior cargo basket, no gear is left behind.

Sours: https://www.toyota.com/4runner/
2020 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro: Virtual Test Drive — Cars.com

Overview

Despite being the elder statesman of the mid-size SUV segment, the 2022 Toyota 4Runner is one of the only ones left that's as rugged as advertised. It may look mostly the same as it did 10 years ago, but its boxed fenders and high beltline still look tough. That image is matched by its sturdy ladder frame and stout V-6 engine, which are great for tackling trails, especially with the lineup's various off-road-ready models, but not so great for refinement and fuel economy. The 4Runner's tall and boxy shape contributes to a spacious cabin and cargo area, but the materials inside look and feel cheap. Toyota offsets the popular off-roader's old age with a suite of standard driver assists, including adaptive cruise control and lane-keeping assist. Still, it's not enough to make the 2022 4Runner as contemporary or desirable as the latest Jeep Wrangler.

What's New for 2022?

For 2022, the 4Runner family welcomes a new TRD Sport model, which for the longest time has only been offered on its pickup counterpart, the Toyota Tacoma. The 4Runner TRD Sport isn't as sporty as its 20-inch wheels, hood scoop, and Sport badges suggest, but unlike most other models except for the more luxurious Limited, it features adaptive dampers that are designed to improve body control. Inside, the TRD Sport features faux-leather upholstery instead of cloth. All 2022 4Runners now illuminate the road with LED high-beams.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

Toyota hasn't released pricing for the 2022 4Runner, but that'll likely be announced before it goes on sale at the end of this summer. Since we expect only a minor increase in how much each trim will cost, we can still recommend the TRD Off-Road model. It's not as capable off-road as the lifted TRD Pro, but its significantly lower price tag makes it a better value. Along with standard four-wheel drive and some TRD-specific exterior and interior bits, the TRD Off-Road gets equipment that helps justify its name. This includes an electronically locking rear differential for maximum traction in slippery or muddy conditions. It also has selectable drive modes (called Multi Terrain Select and Crawl Control) that can alter the SUV's powertrain behavior to accommodate various driving scenarios. We'd select the optional Kinetic Dynamic Suspension, which allows improved wheel articulation during off-road action. We'd also opt for the sliding rear cargo deck, which makes moving heavy cargo easier and even provides tailgate seating.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

Every 4Runner is motivated by a 270-hp 4.0-liter V-6 paired with a five-speed automatic transmission. Available with rear-wheel drive and either full- or part-time four-wheel-drive systems, the outdated powertrain provides unremarkable acceleration, with the last version we tested taking 7.6 second to hit 60 mph. The automatic's lethargic responses certainly don't optimize the engine's uneven behavior, and downshifts often require heavy right-foot inputs to spur the 4Runner ahead. Still, the Toyota feels more composed on pavement than the more unwieldy Wrangler. Our time behind the wheel of the off-road-oriented Venture model showed off the SUV's notable ground clearance, and its body-on-frame construction was supported by a soft suspension that absorbed a variety terrain. The 4Runner's steering is lightly weighted and imprecise, and while those traits betray any sense of sportiness, they're fine for crawling along trails and around parking lots. Aged though the Toyota feels in action, its performance is right in the mix with its more modern competitors, including the V-6 Dodge Durango. And the Toyota's rugged frame and torque-rich engine give it a leg up in towing; its 5000-pound capacity beats the Ford Edge and Wrangler, while falling short of the more powerful Durango's 8700-pound limit.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

The 4Runner's powertrain combinations show their age at the pump, with every model rated at a lowly 16 mpg in the city and 19 mpg on the highway. For comparison, the V-6-powered Wrangler has much better estimates of 19 mpg city and 24 highway. The last 4Runner we tested on our 75-mph highway fuel-economy route, which is part of our extensive testing regimen, did exceed expectations by returning 22 mpg. For more information about the 4Runner's fuel economy, visit the EPA's website.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

The interior of the 4Runner is not what you'd call state-of-the-art, with switchgear that could have come from the latter years of the last millennium. Lackluster materials and styling aside, it manages to comfortably fit humans front and rear in spite of its back-of-the-class interior measurements. We haven't tested the optional third row, but we suspect that it's best for children. A flexible cargo area and several large, deep cubbies in the front row mean that the 4Runner is as versatile a hauler as it is a rock-crawler. Just don't try to heave anything into the cargo hold unless you have a chiropractor on call—its floor is uncomfortably high off the ground. The two-row models that we tested had an optional pull-out cargo deck designed to make loading and unloading heavy items—up to 440 pounds—a little easier. It can also double as a tailgate for seating. This provides a flat load floor when the second-row seats are folded, but also robs the cargo hold of several inches of height. Even so, we fit an impressive 14 carry-ons behind the second row.

Infotainment and Connectivity

Every 4Runner features an 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system. The interface includes a set of physical buttons as well as rotary volume and tuning knobs. The system comes standard with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and a subscription-based Wi-Fi hotspot. A built-in navigation system and a 15-speaker JBL audio system are available upgrades.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

Every model comes with a host of driver-assistance technology that includes automatic high-beam headlamps, blind-spot monitoring, and more. For more information about the 4Runner's crash-test results, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) websites. Key safety features include:

  • Standard forward-collision warning and automated emergency braking
  • Standard lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist
  • Standard adaptive cruise control

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Toyota provides two years of complimentary scheduled maintenance, a rarity in this class. The coverage in other categories is less impressive but matches industry norms.

  • Limited warranty covers three years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
  • Complimentary maintenance is covered for two years or 25,000 miles

Specifications

SPECIFICATIONS 

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road Premium 4WD

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, rear/4-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door hatchback

PRICE AS TESTED
$44,473 (base price: $40,740)

ENGINE TYPE
DOHC 24-valve V-6, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection

Displacement
241 cu in, 3956 cc
Power
270 hp @ 5600 rpm
Torque
278 lb-ft @ 4400 rpm

TRANSMISSION
5-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): control arms/live axle
Brakes (F/R): 13.3-in vented disc/12.3-in vented disc
Tires: Bridgestone Dueler H/T 684 II, 265/70R-17 113S M+S

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 109.8 in
Length: 191.3 in
Width: 75.8 in
Height: 71.5 in
Passenger volume: 96 cu ft
Cargo volume: 47 cu ft
Curb weight: 4796 lb

C/D
TEST RESULTS
Zero to 60 mph: 7.7 sec
Zero to 90 mph: 16.6 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 21.3 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 8.1 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.0 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 4.7 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 16.0 sec @ 88 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 114 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 194 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.76 g

C/D
FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 17 mpg
75-mph highway driving: 22 mpg
Highway range: 500 miles

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 18/17/20 mpg 

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More Features and Specs

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/toyota/4runner

Com toyota 4runner cars

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Here's Why You Need to Buy a Toyota 4Runner

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