Scout 80 vs 800

Scout 80 vs 800 DEFAULT

Which International Scout Should I Buy: Original 80/ Or Scout II?

Turns out buying an International Scout is tougher than I'd thought it'd be. When I finally land on one that feels right, a buyer flakes or somebody scoops it. But the biggest obstacle to getting a Scout has been my own indecisiveness; I can't decide which body style I like better!

The first generation Scout known as the "80" and then "" after a mild face lift has a much more rounded, what I'd call "classic," look. Basically, it's smaller and cuter; the face is sort of the Bugeyed-Sprite of 4x4s.

The original Scout is also much more agricultural than the later truck. There's no carpet, and no padding on the inside of the doors. Drum brakes all around and all the luxuries of a flint axe.

Early 80 models had fold-down windshields with wipers on top, which I love. I picked up a pair of German tank commander googles at a surplus store once and have been dying to justify driving with them on.

To the surprise of many International Harvester sold enough Scouts to warrant a second-generation, and the Scout II was born in the early 's. It's much meatier, bigger looking, and significantly more refined than its predecessor. You can find them with disc brakes, heat, and even air conditioning if you're a real pansy. Granted we're still talking about a forty year old truck here, so that "refinement" is relative.

The Scout II dash is square as a Borg spaceship and quintessentially 70's. The later trucks are a little more powerful and comfortable, and it's worth mentioning they're a somewhat easier to find and find parts for.

Long wheelbase "Terra" pickup and "Traveller" SUV variants were introduced later in the Scout II's run, which are about 18" longer than the regular Scouts. These are especially cool because they offer a lot more utility without sacrificing that much off-road ability or fuel economy. From my perspective, it'd be nice for carrying my motorcycle.

I love each and every variant of the Scout, in both body styles. Hence, my dilemma. All I know is that I need a Scout with a title, manual transmission, on the cheap/rough side without catastrophic levels of rust.

The build is going to be close to stock; get some good tires on it and replace parts as they break. It may also serve duty responding to fire alarms, going camping, and doing some light off-roading but no racing or rock crawlin'.

Can you guys help me figure this out?

Truck Yeah

Sours: https://jalopnik.com/which-international-scout-should-i-buy-original

A Detailed Look Back At The International Harvester Scout Pickup Truck

The Scout Pickup Truck is a discontinued series of off-road vehicles designed and manufactured by the American automobile company International Harvester. Initially intended to rival the Jeep, the Scout laid the foundation for the SUVs' future in the decades to come. While production ceased in , its legacy remains.

The first model of the Scout, the Scout 80, was manufactured from to , which had an easily recognizable feature of having sliding side windows that were removable, together with vacuum windshield wipers and a fold-down windshield. The International Harvester logo was also placed in the center of the tailgate and grille of the vehicle.

There are three series in the Scout 80 model – the Red Carpet series, the Scout 80 Campermobile, and the Early Scout International Harvester introduced the Red Carpet series to celebrate the ,th Scout manufactured, with only 3, units produced. In contrast, the Scout 80 Campermobile was an experiment by the company, permanently mounting a camper body onto the Scout 80 and is extremely rare today. The Early Scout was altered based on the Scout 80 and caused the shift in production.

Let's go through some of the features that made the Harvester Scout a unique truck.

RELATED: Ford Bronco VS International Harvester Scout: Which Was The Best Off-Roader?

Origin

The story of International Harvester pickups and trucks started way back in , but the predecessor to the Scout, the Travelall, only began to roll out in The Travelall was a truck-based people carrier. There was only one type of recreational vehicle available back in the s – the Willys Jeep. To compete with the Jeep CJ 4x4, International Harvester designed and built the Scout It eventually debuted in late

Of course, there were numerous challenges, including a lack of guides in manufacturing the vehicle. The initial military jeep design was failing, but with a little inspiration, the chief designer managed to revive the program, receiving parts from the American company Goodyear. Eventually, the model and design were approved and introduced, with a speedy development time of about two years.

In the two decades where the Scout was in production, International Harvester came up with a total of seven models – the Scout 80, Scout , Scout , Scout II, Scout II Terra, Scout II Traveler, as well as the Super Scout II. It laid the foundation for four-wheeled recreational vehicles from its inception in the s until the end of the century.

Performance

Since there are multiple International Harvester Scout Pickup Truck models, we will be using three of them for comparison. The Scout 80, the Scout , and the Scout II.

The Scout 80 and the Scout have an International spark-ignition 4-stroke engine with two valves per cylinder, whereas the Scout II has an International spark-ignition 4-stroke engine, with two valves per cylinder as well. Like the Scout 80, the Scout has a fuel capacity of gallons, while the Scout II has a much greater capacity of gallons.

The Scout 80 has a horsepower of 92 hp and a torque of ft-lb, together with the Scout However, the Scout II has a higher horsepower of hp and a higher torque of ft-lb.

All three vehicles have a similar maximum speed, with the top speed of the Scout 80, the Scout , and the Scout II being 89 mph, 91 mph, and 93 mph, respectively. Concerning the vehicles' acceleration, the Scout 80 takes seconds to accelerate from 0 to 60 mph, whereas the Scout takes seconds and the Scout II seconds.

RELATED: Bring A Trailer: International Harvester Scout II With Added Third-Row Seating

Features

Earlier, we mentioned some of the unique features of the Scout 80, such as detachable sliding side windows, a fold-down windshield with vacuum wipers installed, as well as the company logo attached to the center of the tailgate and grille. Buyers were given an option of a two-wheel or four-wheel drive, as well as a decision to choose between a full-length travel top and a pickup cap, both of which are removable.

As time went on and the Scout 80 was gradually replaced by the Scout , the vehicle features were revised. The Scout featured a fixed windshield with a wiper attached to its base. The revised design improved the comfort level of the Scout , including the addition of bucket seats, enhancement of heating and instrumentation systems, and other optional changes. There were also minor changes made to the exterior.

Still in the Scout series, the Scout A and Scout B introduced slight changes to the comfort and the drivetrain of the Scout The four-wheel-drive became more or less standardized.

However, the Scout II had the most significant changes since its inception in from the Scout The Scout II has unique front grilles, which sets it apart from the Scout in terms of design. There were several revisions made to the Scout II before it eventually went out of production in

NEXT: These Classic Cars Are Incredibly Slow But We Still Can't Afford Them

ShareTweetEmail

Plymouth Belvedere Sleeper Nicknamed 'Torque Monster' Goes For Wild Cruise

The classic muscle car received a huge horsepower upgrade after sitting dormant for 25 years.

Read Next

About The Author
Marcus Njuguna ( Articles Published)

Marcus has had a lifelong interest in machines and worldly wisdom. When he's not hammering out a blog piece, you can find him in a recording studio working on his music.

More From Marcus Njuguna
Sours: https://www.hotcars.com/international-harvester-scout-pickup-truck-detailed-look-back/
  1. Borutos dad
  2. Plastic dip spray
  3. 7th generation intel
  4. React native firebase/admob
  5. Mount olive school district rating

The International Harvester Scout 80 + &#; An Essential Buying Guide

International Harvester Scout &#; An Introduction

The design brief that led to the creation of the International Harvester Scout sounded simple enough; “Create something to replace the horse”. That was the instruction given by International Harvester&#;s Manager of Engineering, Mr. Reese, to Chief Designer Ted Ornas back in the post-war &#;50s.

International Harvester were looking to design a competitor to the Jeep that so many former GI&#;s had come to appreciate during their war service. The Jeep however was a bare bones military vehicle that would only have appeal to farmers, hunters, and fishermen.

Ted Ornas was being asked to create something that would both compete with the Jeep but also create a new concept of vehicle, and nobody was able to give him any real guidance on what to create. So it was that Ted Ornas started out with a blank sheet of paper and sharp pencil, and began trying to think up this new concept in vehicles.

Scout History

The post-war s were a time when vehicle makers knew they had a market for post-war “austerity” and re-construction vehicles and the Jeep had inspired many so over in Britain the people at Rover had created their Land Rover based on the concept of the Jeep, and to their surprise it sold in droves.

They also discovered that customers were asking for a vehicle with the off road and on road capabilities of the bare bones Land Rover but with a bit more luxury, which led Land Rover to create the Tickford station wagon. But designers were not really sure what exactly to create. Ted Ornas was in a similar position and his initial designs were very much like the bare bones Jeep and the equally bare bones Land Rover.

The initial designs did not inspire management because there just wasn&#;t a coherent vision yet and the project almost died. But Ted Ornas decided to look at the use of plastics to create the body of the four wheel drive and his early sketches of what might be possible got management&#;s attention. The sketches that proposed use of plastics featured curves rather than the slab sided look reminiscent of the Jeep and Land Rover; and the use of curves instantly gave the vehicle a different and more refined style.

The first clay model for the new vehicle was created in June of and received approval in November of that year. Because of the rising cost of building the vehicle in plastics from Goodyear the decision was made to build the new car with a steel body and after a total development time of just two years the decision was made to go ahead and put it into production.

One of the impediments International Harvester faced was the lack of a suitable four cylinder engine. They considered purchasing in engines from another manufacturer until someone came up with the simple but brilliant idea of cutting one of their own V8 engines in half to make it into a four cylinder. The V8 chosen for this exercise was the International Harvester cu. in. which became the cu. in. Comanche four cylinder engine.

Not only did this new four cylinder engine produce a healthy 93hp and lb/ft torque but it also had high parts interchangeability with the existing cu. in. V8 making servicing and provision of spare parts inventory to dealers much easier. The transmission used off the shelf components such as the Warner TA three-speed manual gearbox which was mated to a Dana 18 transfer case and Spicer 27 front and rear axles for the four wheel drive model.

The Scout 80 made its debut in effectively becoming the first American SUV ever created.

International Harvester Scout &#; Models and Specifications

International Harvester Scout 80 (–)

The Scout 80 was the first model of the International Harvester Scout and it was available as either a conventional 2WD or 4WD. Its engine was the Comanche cu. in. ( litre) in-line four cylinder producing power of 93hp and torque of lb/ft and mated to a manual three speed Warn T90 manual gearbox for both 2WD and 4WD models. The 4WD Scout 80 was fitted with a Dana 18 transfer case and with Spicer 27 axles. Suspension was by leaf springs front and rear whilst brakes were hydraulically actuated drums.

The Scout 80 used a conventional ladder chassis and steel bodywork but with a removable roof. The side windows were sliding like the Land Rover and removable. The original Scout 80&#;s had a fixed steel separator between the front seats and the load carrying compartment at the rear but during production this was changed to a removable one. The windshield was foldable and the top mounted windshield wipers vacuum operated. Vacuum operated wipers were a simple and reliable system that were common at the time but which suffered from the problem that when the car is being accelerated the vacuum reduces and so the wipers slow down or stop.

International Harvester realised that they had stumbled onto a winner when sales for the Scout 80 doubled and then tripled exceeding the company&#;s expectations.

Encouraged by their success International Harvester created a special luxury version of the Scout 80 called the “Red Carpet” version to celebrate that they had sold no less than , Scout 80&#;s. The Red Carpet version was a Limited Edition and only 3, were made with one being sent to each International Harvester dealer across the country for showroom display and publicity events. These Red Carpet Edition Scouts were painted in white with a red fully upholstered interior. The cars were fitted with full carpeting and a roof head-liner. A badge on the side of the car read “, Red Carpet Series Scout By International&#;. In advertising International Harvester sought to make the Scout 80 attractive to women customers as was common for US car manufacturers to do at the time. Following on from the Red Carpet model International Harvester also built their Champagne Edition with similar features but instead of it being a limited edition it was offered as a regular option pack.

The other market testing version of the Scout 80 was the Scout 80 Campermobile version which was offered early in the production of the Scout 80 whilst International Harvester were testing the market potential. To create the Campermobile International Harvester extended the bodywork to the  rear and raised the roof height to enable an average height person to stand upright in the rear. Tented bunk beds were provided in the rear compartment.

The tailgate was replaced with an ambulance style swing out door. Options for the Campermobile included a dinette set complete with stand up galley, and a retractable screened chemical toilet. Given that hunting, shooting and fishing were extremely popular in the fifties and sixties it is likely that International Harvester were trying to create a vehicle for that market and it was a good design for fishing, hunting and shooting trips and for camping out at the shooting range for major events. Despite its practicality the Campermobile did not sell well and they are a rare find nowadays. They were quite expensive which is no doubt the reason for their rarity, just as is the case for the Land Rover Tickford station wagons.

International Harvester Scout (–)

In the Scout began replacing the Scout 80 in dealer showrooms. The Scout was an upgraded version of the original Scout 80 so it looked essentially the same in terms of body style but had various improvements including front bucket seats, good heating, revised instrumentation with an updated dashboard, and optional rear seats. The windshield wipers continued to be vacuum operated but were moved to the bottom of the windshield. The windshield of the new model was no longer folding. The luxury Champagne option pack introduced on the Scout 80 continued to be available on the Scout

A new option pack for the Scout was the Scout Sportop which featured a new design fibreglass roof with a slanted rear roof. This model was also available as a four seater soft top convertible. The Scout Sportop was fitted with a continental spare tire kit which carried the spare tyre vertically at the rear of the vehicle on the tailgate. This model also had divided rear bumpers.

New on the Scout were engine options for a cu. in. ( litre) in-line four cylinder engine and a cu. in. ( litre) in-line six cylinder. Whilst the base engine remained the same cu. in. in-line four this was also offered in a turbocharged version, the T, producing hp. Although it may seem to have been an unusual decision to offer a turbocharged version of the cu. in. engine we should be aware that International Harvester customers were used to turbochargers on trucks so this was familiar technology to them. As it turned out the new cu. in. conventionally aspirated four cylinder produced the same power but with better fuel consumption so the T turbocharged engine was dropped from production in early

In the Scout was upgraded to the Scout A. This model had some cosmetic changes but most significant were the improvements to the drive train. The transfer box was upgraded to a Dana 20 whilst the front axle became a Dana 30 hybrid and the rear axle a Dana Final drive ratio was , with and  available as options.

These drive train upgrades were necessary as new engine options were provided; cu. in. four-cylinder, cu. in. six-cylinder, cu. in. V8, and cu. in. V8. The cu. in. in-line six was only offered for a short period in and was dropped from production. Later the manual gearbox was upgraded to a four speed unit.

The body styles for the Scout A were the Aristocrat, which was much like the original Scout 80 body style but with luxury features, the later SR2, and the Sportop.

Briefly, from August until March just prior to the end of production of the Scout A  a transitional model B was produced. This model had cosmetic changes such as the change from black headlight surrounds to chrome ones. Despite being in production for such a short time the Scout B was available with the luxury Comanche option pack and also as the SnoStar made specifically for snow plough use which was only made with the six cylinder engine.

The Scout B was the last version of the original International Harvester Scout 80/ series of vehicles and it was superseded by the Scout II in April

Buying an International Harvester Scout

The design brief that led to the creation of the International Harvester Scout sounded simple enough; “Create something to replace the horse”. That was the instruction given by International Harvester&#;s Manager of Engineering, Mr. Reese, to Chief Designer Ted Ornas back in the post-war &#;50s.

The International Harvester Scout 80 and are conventional and technologically agricultural vehicles with a chassis and steel body. The engines in them are also very conventional and so these vehicles are not complex to work on. Power steering and power brakes were optional and if you are buying a Scout one with both these options is a better bet. Non power assisted steering is usable but will require a bit of muscle power and the same is true of the non servo assisted brakes.

The big ticket item to look for in an International Harvester Scout Scout 80/ is body and chassis rust. There is no substitute for getting under the vehicle and thoroughly looking for corrosion especially around spring mountings. Remember that rust normally starts from the inside and works its way out so look for paint bubbling which will indicate rustiness underneath it. The same applies to all the body panels, look in the crevices where moisture, wet leaves etc. can gather, pick out the dirt and crud and have a good look at the metal underneath.

Watch areas inside the fenders and around welds. International Harvester were not greatly conscientious about rust proofing so expect to find problems. Many Scouts were used on snow treated with salt and so the steel work can finish up looking like a colander. The same goes for cars which have been used on the beach such as for fishing or have lived by the coast. That being said the body panels are available in steel or fibreglass so rusty bodywork can be restored. Just remember that if you try to restore badly rusted original panels you are going to be up for many hours of work.

With any off road vehicle you need to be aware that it may have been roughly used off road and such activities can leave dents in the chassis which weaken it and can deform it. So you need to check that chassis for damage and check chassis alignment.

Mechanically the engines and transmissions can be overhauled and rebuilt, the suspension likewise. So your Scout 80/ is a bit like a Meccano set that can be fully taken apart and sorted out.

Thanks in large part to the high sales figures of the Scout 80 and , engine and transmission parts are widely available &#; many times you can buy brand new replacements. Although new parts are typically more expensive than reconditioned parts, they typically last longer and can offer improved reliability.

It&#;s possible to make a series of mechanical upgrades to early Scouts, as with all vintage vehicles it can help a great deal to install a digital ignition system in place of the original points. Carburetors can be replaced with more modern units too, and if you really want to roll your sleeves up you can buy new wiring looms to totally replace the now aged originals.

Engine swaps have been very popular, particularly in early Scouts, and it can be a great way to significantly increase power without killing fuel economy. Of course, any increase in power needs to be paired with improved brakes, and a stronger transmission. Suspension upgrades are also a good idea, and kits for all of these items are easy to buy online.

Conclusion

The International Harvester Scout 80 and vehicles have a well deserved reputation for being excellent both on road and off road and all the shades in between. They are tough, well designed, not difficult to work on, and there are lots of after market parts available for them. If you are looking for a restoration project these are a great car to consider. Likewise if you are someone who will want to use their classic Scout for hunting, shooting, fishing or camping then the Scout 80 and were always a great vehicle for that and still are today.

Editor’s Note: If you have tips, suggestions, or hard earned International Harvester Scout experience that you’d like to add to this buying guide please shoot us an email. We’re always looking to add to our guides, and your advice could be very helpful to other enthusiasts, allowing them to make a better decision.

 

Ben Branch

Ben Branch

Ben has had his work featured on CNN, Popular Mechanics, Smithsonian Magazine, Road & Track Magazine, the official Pinterest blog, the official eBay Motors blog, BuzzFeed, and many more.

Silodrome was founded by Ben back in , in the years since the site has grown to become a world leader in the alternative and vintage motoring sector, with millions of readers around the world and many hundreds of thousands of followers on social media.


Sours: https://silodrome.com/buying-guide-international-harvester-scout/
1966 Scout 80/800 International Turbo Diesel

  

When did International Harvester start building Scouts?  In the late s IH began a design plan to produce a vehicle to compete with the Jeep CJ. By late the first Scout was available. was the first model year. International has been building Trucks, Pickups and later Travelalls since The Scout 80 was the designation for the Scout models.

 

Hatching the Scout - Words from Ted Ornas Chief Designer of the Scout (our Kitchen Table Creator!)

This rough sketch was the "father" of the International Scout. The market potential for a 4 wheel drive recreational vehicle was an unknown quantity in the early s. The only such vehicle offered in the post-war period was the Willys Jeep,  a version of the military jeep produced for World War II. It was a flat-sided bare-bones product, and American military personal learned to appreciate its ability to maneuver over rough terrain. Sales volume was very low. In early we were directed to develop a concept proposal to enter this small market of that time. So help me, Mr.Reese manager of engineering, said "design something to replace the horse." There was no product definition to use as a guide. It was even proposed to use the defunct Henry J body tooling. Compound body surfaces was

considered too far out for this type of vehicle. The military jeep was thought to have the correct appearence. Our design sketches with the flat-side, no contour look never excited the executive committee. The program began to die. One night while sitting at our kitchen table (full of frustration and deseration). I dashed off this rough sketch on a piece of scrap mat board (shown above). It had contoured sides and was designed for plastic tooling. The next  morning it was shown to a committee member. He reviewed it with controlled enthusiasm, but revived interest in the

program. We were off and running.

Goodyear produced many plastic parts for WWII and had formed a large plastic engineering group. We entered a program with them, a scale model was vacuum formed to simulate body assembly. this model received excutive approval for appearance. By July , Goodyear completed thier costing and, because of the high costs, the plastic program was cancelled. By this time the contoured design met with excutive approval and a descision was made to convert the body design to steel. Starting in late July a full size clay model was completed and, in November , it was approved.

Looking back, it was a remarkable program with fast paced engineering and manufacturing developments. the total development time of 24 months was a heroic achievement considering the concept was unique and no in-house engine or manufacturing was available or even considered when the program started.
The first Scout was introduced in A concept for its replacement was initiated in and approved for produsction in mid The Scout II was introduced in The basic sheet metal remained the unchanged until production stopped in October During the 20 year period () , Scouts were produced. The Scout, introduced as a commercial utlity pickup in , set the stage for future 4 wheel recreational vehicles of the 70s, 80s, and 90s.

 

Click here to view The Ted Ornas Interviews! 

 

What is the difference between models: Scout 80 and Scout ?  Scout 80s were built between to These models were identifiable by sliding windows (), 4 cyl. engine, a fold-down windshield, vacuum windshield wipers at the top of the windshield and an IH logo in the center of the grill.The Scout was built in late to These models were built with more improvements in comfort and design and had fixed windshield frame, bucket seats, windshield wipers at the bottom of the windshield, an optional 4-cyl., 6cyl, V-8, & V-8 from to International nameplate replaced the IH logo on the grill. Letter A & B were added to the last year models: Scout A & Scout B

How Do I tell the differences between Scout II year models?  Scout II's were manufactured from mid year to The Scout II, Terra and Traveler were produced from Terra's and Travelers had fiberglass tops: half top for the Terra or full top with hatchback type liftgate on the Traveler. SSII or Super Scout II was built from to in order to compete with the Jeep CJ.  This model included a soft top with soft doors, Jeep style mirrors, plastic door inserts, special plastic grille and a roll bar, among other options. Several SSIIs were champions on the off-road racing circuit during the late 70s! The Scout II is most identifiable by its different front grills. The - '72 Scout II shared the same grill, three horizontal bars between the headlights and chrome rings around the headlights Scout II's had 14 vertical bars between the headlights, a split in the middle, seven bars on each side surrounded by chrome trim pieces and an International model plate low on the left side - '75, Scout II grills were the same as , with the addition of a vertical bar trim overlay. The had chrome & black square trim rings around the headlights had the same headlight trim rings as , a chrome center grill of 15 horizontal bars split into three sections was used in this year only. 79 Scout II's used the same grille between the same headlight bezels the new chrome grill had two large horizontal bars with three vertical support lines and the International nameplate moved up to the center of the grill on the left side the final year of production for the Scout, it had a very distinctive grill design available with black or silver, a one piece grill with square headlights, made of hard plastic, both grill color options had imprinted chrome trim around the headlights and on international name located on the left side.

 

What engines were available in Scouts models?  International offered a variety of engines:Scout 80 A B - 65 had standard: gasoline powered engine 4-cyl. From to 71 had options of these gasoline powered 4-cyl., 6-cylinder, V-8, V There was a brief option for the 4 cylinder of a turbocharger in The Scout II made between  and had engine options like: 4-cylinder., (Early) 6-cylinder, 6-cylinder, V-8, V-8, SD Diesel (non-turbo), SDT Diesel (Turbocharged) engine. V-8s were never installed in any Scouts from the factory. was the first year for a diesel powered vehicle to be available in the US, it was in the Scout II! IH used the Nissan SD diesel engine for fuel economy. In IH SD was replaced with the SDT (Turbocharged) diesel engine. These Diesel Scouts were great for economy, getting 20 mpg in the city and up to 30 mpg on the highway. All gasoline engines offered were made by IH including the v which is sometimes confused with the AMC , except for the AMC 6-cylinder, 6-cylinder. The full sized IH Pickups and Travelalls used an AMC v as an option when there was a shortage of IH vs in

 

 

How many Diesel Engines were used Scout IIs? 

 

Nissan Diesel Scout Production

 

    SD            

    SD        

    SD        

    SD         

    SDT       

    SDT       

_____________________ 

                            10, Total

 

How can I tell what axles are under my Scout? Dana 27 & 30 were used in Scout 80 A B. Each axle cover should have a tag to ID the Axle, if not the Lineticket can be checked to ID the axle and ratio.In Scout IIs until Dana 30 front axles and Dana 44 rear axles were standard. Dana 44 front axles special order in After Dana 44 axles became standard on all Scout IIs.To tell the difference on Scout IIs you can compare axle covers. If they look the same, front to rear, they should both be Dana 44's. If the front cover is a smaller and is more rounded cover, it is should be a Dana The Vehicles Lineticket can also be used to ID the axle, ratio or if the vehicle is equipped with a posi (Trac-loc) rear end or open carrier.

What gear ratios were available in Scout II's?  , , , , and ratios.

What year Scout II had disc brakes?  Late Scout IIs and later had disc and power brakes as standard from the factory. Early s had Disc brakes as an option only and they were rare.

What was the Shawnee Scout? The Shawnee Scout (SSII) was to be a trim type and special feature package model produced by The Hurst Corporation, all black SSII with special Tomahawk and feather decals, special seats, with a black targa style top, hard tonneau bed cover and of course a Hurst shifter. There were only three or four of these ever produced.

 

 

What does CVI mean? CVI - Custom Vehicles Incorporated (also associated with Good Times Inc.) was a company located around the corner from the Ft Wayne Scout Assembly Plant that produced for IH Dealers special models in - These were dressed up Scout models with special exterior decals and trim, center console coolers, hood scoops, some editions had plastic window louvers on the rear side glass, fender flares, and two different plastic tailgates insert. Model names included: Midnitestar, Terrastar, Travelstar, Shadow, Raven, 2 Classic models, GMS (Green Machine Sport), Hot Stuff, Trailstar, Sportstar, Liter & Liter models.

 

 

What was the "Selective Edition" Scout II? This was a Special package available from the factory. Package order code on the Lineticket was , the package included special gold accent stripes, gold spoke wheels with Goodyear Tracker A-Ts, SSII black grill insert, Sport Steering wheel. Other options available: Choice of Power train, Seats, Interior, Radios, Cruise control, Tow packages, AC, available in exterior colors Dark Brown, Dark Blue, Black, Green. Available on Travel top, Traveler and Terra.

 

 

What is the difference between Spirit of 76 and the Patriot?  For the USA Bicentennial, in , IH produced the Spirit of 76 and the Patriot models. The Spirit of 76 had a special blue soft top and blue/red side applique and only available on the Scout II The Spirit also had blue interior, racing type steering wheel and 7 " inch chrome rally wheels. Lineticket codes included:

 

for the side applique.
to omit the hard top.
Deluxe interior.
blue interior color.
Winter white exterior paint.
front tires.
Rear tires with spare.
7"Chrome wheels.

The Patriot had a hard top and the same blue/red side applique and was available in a Scout II, Terra or Traveler. Sales figures on the Patriot only show 1 Terra, 7 Travelers, and 50+ Scout IIs were manufactured. However there was another undetermined number of patriots built without Lineticket code designations and the applique was applied at the TSPC (Truck Sales Processing Center) making difficult to know just how many were actually built. IH Data only shows Spirit models ever being built making both models extremely rare!

 

 

 

What is the "Midas Edition" Scout II?   80 IH contracted with Midas Van Conversion Co. of Elkhart IN., to build special luxury models to offered through its dealers. These vehicles had swivel bucket seats, shag carpeted, color keyed interiors, door panels, headliner, sunroofs, grille guards, dual sunroofs, overhead clocks, 3rd seat, reading lights, tinted windows, fender flares and special side appliques and paint designs. Models included the Family Cruiser or just: Cruisers, Street Machine, and Off-Road Vehicle. These vehicles had swivel bucket seats, shag carpet interiors, sunroofs and flashy side appliques and paint designs. Another Company Called Van American (Goshen IN.) offered similar options to compete with Midas, however these vehicles were only offered for a short time making them very rare today.

 

 

What was the last special package for Scout II offered through IH?  Probably one the rarest models ever produced by IH was the RS, the Special Limited Edition RS Scout. This package was only available on the Traveler in Tahitian Red with special extras inside and out, including polycast wheels with Tahitian red accent, luxurious plush all-velour russet interior including headliner and visors, special pin striping, wood grain trim instrument panel and shift console, chrome bumpers, tinted glass plus more. 2 other special packages offered in were the and Gold Star Models. offered standard equipment plus v8 HD clutch, T 4 speed transmission, rear axle ratio, am radio, rear seat, hub caps, special black side applique and paint on lower body, & black carpet. offered standard equipment plus engine, T 3 speed transmission, rear Axle Ratio, Black vinyl interior. am radio, rear seat, hub caps, special black side applique and paint on lower body, & black carpet.

 

 

Were there any special Packages offered on the Scout 80 A B?  The first was the Red Carpet Series, celebrating the first , Scout manufactured by IH. This model had a red interior with a white exterior, full length headliner, a personalized medallion with the words inscribed: ", Red Carpet Series Scout By International" affixed to the door. IH offered the Sportop edition Scout , which had a slanted sporty type canvas or fiberglass top. The Champagne edition was a "dolled up" Scout Later the Scout A & B came out with the Aristocrat, SR-2, Commanche, and Sno-Star models. Each of these Scout packages had their own special paint and decals with many options making them special and above normal models.

 

 

 

Where there ever any Special Packages offered on Pickups? There are only 3 known: First, The Golden Jubolee Pickup which celebrated 50 years of International Trucks in   The second was The Johnnie Reb, a Pickup built in for the Southern States The third was a Snowstar Pickup which is listed in the parts books however we have never come across one in person but have found a photo of a rough snowstar pickup recently.

 

Johnnie Reb Pickup:

 

 

Snowstar Pickup:

 

 

Golden Jubilee Custom Pickup:
was international Harvesters 50th anniversary for building quality trucks. It was an ideal year

for IH to get on the band wagon with their own special edition model or country club set pickup. This

special pickup became available, just as the Cameo was produced by Chevrolet with all the trimmings. The Jubilee was a basic IH pickup with a special pickup box. The box was of the Cameo type with sides flush with the cab lines rather than the standard stepside type of box that has regained popularity on today's pickups. This truck sported a special gold and white paint scheme, accented with chrome trim, bumpers and grille. White wall tires Dual mirrors, custom gold nylon seat covers, with color keyed padded door panels, sun visors and arm rests were added to this luxurious package.  The engine choices were of 3 six-cylinder engines from the BD up to the BD for which IH claimed had V8 performance with six-cylinder economy. Optional power steering, automatic 3 speed transmission and power brakes made the Golden Jubilee retain its truck heritage while offering passenger car performance and handling.

 

What is a Lineticket? When an IH Vehicle was ordered, a Factory build or construction sheet is created (when order is sent to the factory) with the new vehicles Vin or ID number, all the codes for standard equipment and options the salesman used to create this vehicle for his customer or inventory. This sheet is used to assemble the vehicle from beginning to finish. After the factory assembles the vehicle and the vehicle is shipped and sold, the Lineticket identifies such things as the engine type, transmission type, drive line, paint codes, gear ratio, and standard and optional equipment, specific to that vehicle. This was and still is a very valuable tool when ordering parts later at the dealership by the customer. A very small copy of the Lineticket was attached to each vehicle in different places during the building process at the factory. - '76 Scout II's had its copy of the Lineticket under the vehicles hood attached to the cowl cover panel. '80 Scout II's had its copies on the inside of the glove box door.  

Lineticket Code Reference Guide Click here

Sours: http://www.superscoutspecialists.com/store/t-faq.aspx

Vs scout 800 80

Scout Stats: International Harvester 4x4 Spotters Guide

Scout Stats

International Harvester (IH) has a long history of building agricultural and trucking equipment. The company was founded in and has just about as long a history building light trucks. Fast forward to the early ’60s when the company began producing an economical, utilitarian vehicle for the public. It was known as the Scout and was introduced as a ’61 model. This IH lineage would grow in popularity and survive model changes over a year timespan.

The Scout was generally a wagon or SUV body style, but truck models were produced as well. Engine choices would range from four-cylinder to V-8 powerplants, with an occasional diesel thrown in. All this sat on tried and true straight axles supported by traditional leaf springs. Today, many of the half-million Scouts live on, whether still doing rural farm work or following dirt trails taking families on fourwheeling adventures.

Scout 80 ( to )

The original Scout was the Model 80 which sat on a inch wheelbase. It was brought to market in in both 4x2 and 4x4 models, with the 4WD versions more popular. IH produced a tick over , units during the Model 80’s five-year lifespan.

In , International Harvester advertised the new Scout stating, “Quick-change artist. In minutes you can make the Scout whatever kind of vehicle you want. Weather tight cab top, doors and windows are easy to take off, even the windshield folds down. It’s a station wagon, a convertible, a light-duty hauler, a runaboutlike having four vehicles for the price of one!” The Scout 80 was offered with several different removable top options and a fold-down windshield.

The short wheelbase SUV sat on a ladder-frame similar to the trucks of the day. The Scout 80 had a payload rating of pounds and utilized a leaf-spring suspension with straight axles, as was common in the day. The front 4WD axle was a closed-knuckle Spicer 27 or 27A. The rear axle could be a Spicer 27 or a Spicer 44 (starting in ). Powr-Lok limited-slip units were also optional. Factory standard axle ratio was , but for some years, and ratios were added as optional. Manual steering was via a Ross steering box and linkage and drum brakes sat at all four corners.

Only four-cylinder engines were offered in the Scout The ci engines were overhead-valve slant-four powerplants derived from the V-8 engine and designated the Comanche. The normally aspirated engine had a gross rating of 93 hp, but in late , a turbocharged version became an option and produced about hp.

The three-speed manual transmission was the BorgWarner T in the 4WD Scouts and the iron-case, gear-drive transfer case was a Spicer 18 ( low range) with offset rear output. A PTO output at the transfer case was also available during the early years of the Scout.

Scout ()

For the ’66 model year, IH introduced the Scout , though its body design did not change all that much from the previous generation Scout. It was a quieter vehicle and kept the same inch wheelbase as the Scout International added suffix indicators to the Scout as improvements were made. The A was assigned to the ’’70 models, and B was assigned to the ’71 models.

The Scout started out with the Comanche (both naturally aspirated and turbocharged versions) that was used in the Scout 80, but a powertrain upgrade was needed. An optional ci four-cylinder was quickly offered on the A (out-performing the turbocharged which was phased out by ), along with a ci I-6 option. Then, a ci V-8 was introduced in early , followed by a ci V-8 a few years later. A body lift was used from the factory to accommodate the larger engines.

The T three-speed manual was standard in the 4WD models with the T (a version of the T) close-ratio, four-speed transmission ( First gear ratio) optional. When the A came along the BorgWarner Model 11 automatic transmission was offered for the V-6 and V-8 models.

A Dana 20 transfer case was used and had a low-range ratio. It was an improvement over the previous Spicer 18 model with offset rear output and was quieter to boot. It did not offer the PTO ability of the previous transfer case, but the factory soon began to offer electric winch options.

A heavy-duty Dana 44 rear axle was offered starting in and they were often used with the Voptioned Scouts. These versions were a bit wider than the earlier Dana 44 axles. A Powr-Lok (and later a Trac-Lok) limited slip was available in some axles. As time progressed, a Dana 30 front axle was introduced to replace the Dana 27, and it was later widened to match up to the wider rear axle in use. Gearing was again , , or ratios.

Scout II ()

IH had been planning for some years to introduce a new Scout model that was originally designated as the X-Scout, and then later changed to Various delays and funding issues pushed the release date out as the Scout was revised to improve the vehicle in the interim. By the time the new Scout came to market it was known as the Scout II.

The base Scout II powerplant in was the ci I-4 engine, but International also offered the ci I-6, ci V-8, and a ci V An AMC ci I-6 would replace the original I-6 in late Electronic ignition was introduced shortly after, and by , all the V-8 engines were electronic. There was a Nissan I-6 diesel option starting in , plus the SDT Nissan turbodiesel in

The T transmission was still the standard three-speed manual with the T four-speed optional. Two three-speed BorgWarner automatics (T and T) were offered with the bigger engines, with a Chrysler TorqueFlite auto replacing the T about a year into production. Then, in , IH offered the Warner T, a fully synchronized three-speed manual, as standard with all engines. In , the T replaced the T four-speed. Both close and wide ratio versions were supplied, with the wide ratio unit using a First gear. The Scout II continued to use the Dana 20 transfer case, except in when it got the Dana transfer case with low-range gearing.

The early Scout II models came with front drum brakes with disc brakes standard starting in Power steering became standard on all U.S. Scouts in , which was the final model year of manufacture and a year in which 2WD models were not offered.

We’d be remiss if we didn’t tell you about an excellent resource if you want to dig deeper into Scout history: the International Scout Encyclopedia by Jim Allen and John Glancy. It’s extremely well researched and full of build details. Historical images used here with permission of the Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS).

MotorTrend LogoTHE LATEST IN CAR NEWS

EMAIL NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP!

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

Sours: https://www.motortrend.com/features/scout-stats-international-harvester-4x4-spotters-guide/
1970 Scout 80/800 International Lifted Custom V8 4x4

International Harvester Scout

Not to be confused with Indian Scout (motorcycle).

Motor vehicle

The International Harvester Scout is an off-road vehicle produced by International Harvester from to A precursor of more sophisticated SUVs to come, it was created as a competitor to the Jeep, and it initially featured a fold-down windshield. The Scout and second-generation Scout II were produced in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as two-door trucks with a removable hard top with options of a full-length roof, half-cab pickup, and/or soft top.

Origin[edit]

The first model, a Scout 80, in pickup style with removable hard top. A full cap was also available, this is known as the travel top.

International Harvester began building trucks and pickups in In , International added a truck-based people carrier, the Travelall. During the late s, International began to design a competitor for the two-door Jeep CJ 4x4. The model year Scout 80 made its debut in late

Later, chief designer Ted Ornas recalled:

the market potential for a four-wheel drive recreational vehicle was an unknown quantity in the early s. The only such vehicle offered in the post-war period was the Willys Jeep, a version of the military jeep produced for World War II. It was a flat-sided bare-bones product, and American military personnel learned to appreciate its ability to maneuver over rough terrain. Sales volume was very low. In early , we were directed to develop a concept proposal to enter this small market of that time. So help me, Mr. Reese, manager of engineering, said 'design something to replace the horse.' There was no product definition to use as a guide. It was even proposed to use the defunct Henry J body tooling. Compound body surfaces were considered too far out for this type of vehicle. The military jeep was thought to have the correct appearance. Our design sketches with the flat-side, no-contour look never excited the executive committee. The program began to die. One night while sitting at our kitchen table (full of frustration and desperation), I dashed off this rough sketch on a piece of scrap mat board. It had contoured sides and was designed for plastic tooling. The next morning it was shown to a committee member. He reviewed it with controlled enthusiasm, but revived interest in the program. We were off and running. Goodyear produced many plastic parts for WWII and had formed a large plastic engineering group. We entered a program with them, a scale model was vacuum formed to simulate body assembly. This model received executive approval for appearance. By July , Goodyear completed their costing, and because of the high costs, the plastic program was cancelled. By this time, the contoured design met with executive approval and a decision was made to convert the body design to steel. Starting in late July , a full-sized clay model was completed, and in November , it was approved. Looking back, it was a remarkable program with fast-paced engineering and manufacturing developments. The total development time of 24 months was an heroic achievement considering the concept was unique and no in-house engine or manufacturing was available or even considered when the program started.
"The first Scout was introduced in A concept for its replacement was initiated in and approved for production in mid The Scout II was introduced in The basic sheet metal remained unchanged until production stopped on October 21, During the year period (–), , Scouts were produced. The Scout, introduced as a commercial utility pickup in , set the stage for future four-wheel drive recreational vehicles of the s, s and s.

Scout models and variants[edit]

Scout models include the:

  • Scout 80 (–): The original.
  • Scout (–): Same overall design as original with upgrades (electric wipers, newer engines, etc.).
  • Scout (): Some early Scout IIs contain Scout badging on the glove box.
  • Scout II (–): The later standard production model with a removable soft or hard top (in wheelbase).
  • Scout II Terra (–): The light pickup truck version (in wheelbase).
  • Scout II Traveler (–): This version had a removable fiberglass hardtop, and optional third row of seats (in wheelbase).
  • Super Scout II (–): This model had removable fabric doors, a rollbar, and soft top. The soft-top model was tagged the "SSII" by IH marketing. Eventually, the "SS" letters were assumed to stand for "Super Scout", the name this model is called presently.

Scout 80[edit]

Rear view of an International Harvester Scout 80, showing the IH logo and tailgate hooks.

Scout 80s were built between and These models were identifiable by removable sliding side windows in – and even some very early models, a fold-down windshield, vacuum windshield wipers mounted to the top of the windshield, and an IH logo in the center of the grille and tailgate. The Scout 80 had the gasoline-powered four-cylinder as its standard engine.

The first special package was the "Red Carpet" series, celebrating the ,th Scout manufactured by International, and only 3, were produced. This model had a red interior with a white exterior, full-length headliner, full floor mats, and a special medallion that was silver plated affixed to the door which read "Custom". This Scout was a step up from regular ones; it was marketed to attract more people, and was often advertised with women in mind. Each International dealer in the United States received one Red Carpet series Scout to be used in parades, in the showroom, and for promotional purposes.

International Harvester Scout 80 Campermobile.

During the early s, International experimented with a camper body permanently mounted to the Scout The roof was raised to nearly double the original height (to allow standing upright inside), tented sleeping bunks folded out of the sides, and the rear of the body was extended significantly. The tailgate/liftgate system was replaced with one large ambulance-style swinging door. Plans included that the unit could be purchased as a stripped-down shell ($ installed), or as a "deluxe" unit, which included a dinette set, stand-up galley, and a screened chemical toilet that retracted into the wall ($ installed). The May issue of Mechanix Illustrated contains a full-color advertisement for the Scout Camper on the inside cover, which features two artist's renderings of the unit and a form to fill out and send in for free literature. The camper showed up again in the May issue of Popular Science, this time in an actual photo as part of a two-page article about pickup campers. Production of these units was low due to limited orders, and they are now rare.

It is known that Scout 80s were built in and the new was developed during However, some scouts built later in the year are considered a Scout as indicated by the VIN tag and Line Setting Ticket (LST). An assumed of these 1/2 Scouts exist which make them interesting to study how manufacturers will use what's left in the parts bin from the previous model to build the new model. Some notable parts used in the piecing together these new models were the hood that retained the tie down loop that would hold down the folding windshield. The reason this is significant is because the new windshield doesn't fold down. Also, the front grill was that of 80 but now used on the new it featured a gold plated IH emblem on a black backing piece secured to a durable and stylish wire mesh grill. Axles is a major detail as well; the new featured a stronger Dana However, these early models still got the weaker Dana 27 that was more prone to axle shafts breaking during heavy use off-road. Although the Dana 27 was still available if desired vs the Dana The Dana 27 in Scouts was obsolete by By this time, these new models were 4 wheel drive and standard equipment at that.

An early Scout , built with remaining Scout 80 parts. The hood loop in the center and grill from the 80 are present here. This vehicle's final inspection took place on 10/14/65 and it was deemed a new model.

From here on, the Scout would be known as the Scout

Scout [edit]

Motor vehicle

International Scout
IHC-Scoutjpg
ManufacturerInternational Harvester
Production
Engine&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) ComancheI4
&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) I4
&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) I6
&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) V8
PredecessorInternational Scout 80
SuccessorInternational Scout A

The Scout replaced the Scout 80 during The new model was built from to These models had many improvements of comfort and design, including bucket seats, better instrumentation and heating systems, updated dashboard, optional rear seats, and optional four-cylinder (from ), or inline-six. Beginning in March , a &#;ci V8 engine was also offered. Externally, changes were limited to an anodized aluminum grille with a rectangular "International" logo placed on the grille, the IH badge was moved to the hood, the door handles became the button type, and the tailgate no longer included the "hooks".[1] The base engine was a naturally aspirated "Comanche" four-cylinder with 93&#;hp (69&#;kW), of which a turbocharged version with &#;hp (83&#;kW) (the T) was also offered. In August , the turbo version was complemented by the bigger which used less fuel with exactly the same power. The motor achieved 20 mpg.[2] The turbo version was discontinued during early The fold-down windshield was still available, code , but few were ordered because this was not advertised. The vacuum-powered wipers were moved to the bottom of the windshield frame with the fixed windshield.

International Harvester Scout Sportop

Beginning in early , International also offered the Scout Sportop, which had an upgraded interior and a unique fiberglass top (also available as a convertible) with a slanted rear roof and a continental spare tire kit.[2] The "Champagne Series" Scout was an upscale model offered in the Scout 80 and later Scout models that featured a headliner, door panels, and carpet.

Scout A[edit]

Motor vehicle

International Scout A
ManufacturerInternational Harvester
ProductionNovember –
Related D-Series pickup
Engine&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) ComancheI4
&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) I4
&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) I6
&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) V8
&#;cu&#;in (&#;L) V8
PredecessorInternational Scout
SuccessorInternational Scout B

The A replaced the during November Improvements included more creature-comfort options, a slightly different front-end treatment, drivetrain upgrades (heavier rear axle and quieter Dana 20 transfer case), and the options of a four-cylinder, six-cylinder, V8, or V8. The inline-six was only offered for a short period in early [3] The A's grille was in three segments: the center grill and two matte-black headlight bezels. The Light Line of pickup trucks received bodywork similar to that of the Scout in late

The A could still be ordered with the Sportop (a slanted sporty top made of canvas or fiberglass), and later in Aristocrat and SR-2 packages. The Aristocrat was the final version of the original-bodied Scout. These trucks had a blue, vinyl interior, were painted blue and silver, and had a chrome roof rack; four-wheel drive was standard for most models.

Scout B[edit]

Motor vehicle

International Scout B
ManufacturerInternational Harvester
ProductionAugust - March (8 months)
PredecessorInternational Scout A
SuccessorInternational Scout II

The last of the series was the B, available for less than eight months, from August until March , before it was replaced with the Scout II. Other than minor cosmetic details (primarily chrome headlight bezels instead of matte black), it was identical to the A. It was only produced until the Scout II was in production.

The B was available with the Comanche package. This package included special paint and decals, chrome trim, sliding travel-top windows, and other "high dollar" options such as roof racks, chrome wheels, and upgraded interiors. Line tickets of the special-package Scouts (and some nonpackage units) were stamped. After the factory assembles the vehicle and the vehicle is shipped and sold, the line ticket identifies such things as the engine type, transmission type, drive line, paint codes, gear ratio, and standard and optional equipment, specific to that vehicle. This provides very valuable information when ordering parts later at a dealership. A variety of parts was used for these vehicles, so the expression "no two are quite the same" is not that fanciful. Late in , the Sno-Star package appeared (only with the six-cylinder engine), developed especially for snow-plow usage.[4]

Scout II[edit]

Motor vehicle

International Scout II
 IH Scout II.jpg
ManufacturerInternational Harvester
ProductionApril –
AssemblyFort Wayne, IN
LayoutRWD, 4WD
Engineci IH Naturally Aspirated Inline-4

ci AMC Naturally Aspirated Inline-6

ci AMC Naturally Aspirated Inline-6

ci IH Naturally Aspirated V-8

ci IH Naturally Aspirated V-8

ci Nissan SD33 Naturally Aspirated Diesel Inline-6

ci Nissan SDT Turbocharged Diesel Inline-6 (very few and only)
Transmission3-speed Borg Warner T manual

3-speed Borg Warner T manual

4-speed Borg Warner T manual

4-speed Borg Warner T manual

4-speed Borg Warner T manual

3-speed Borg Warner T automatic

3-speed Borg Warner T automatic

3-speed Chrysler A automatic
Wheelbase” Scout II, ” Terra and Traveler
PredecessorInternational Scout B
A – Scout II Traveler
IH Scout II with Rallye package

Scout IIs were manufactured from April to The design was finalized much earlier, with a version nearly identical to the production model shown to management during December [5]

The Scout II is most identifiable by its different front grilles. The – Scout IIs shared the same grille, three horizontal bars between the headlights and chrome rings around the headlights. The Scout IIs had 14 vertical bars between the headlights, a split in the middle, seven bars on each side surrounded by chrome trim pieces and an "International" model plate low on the left side. The –75 Scout II grilles were the same as , with the addition of a vertical bar trim overlay. The had chrome and black, square trim rings around the headlights; had the same headlight trim rings as , and a chrome center grille of 15 horizontal bars split into three sections was used in this year only. The –79 Scout IIs used the same grille between the same headlight bezels the new chrome grille had two large horizontal bars with three vertical support lines and the "International" nameplate moved up to the center of the grille on the left side.

Scout II’s could be ordered with the Traveltop, which was the full metal top, Roadster which was a half-cab variant seldom seen, or with a soft top.

In , the final year of production for the Scout, the grille was a very distinctive design, available with black or silver, a one-piece grille with square headlights, made of Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic. Both grille color options had imprinted chrome trim around the headlights and an "International" name mark located on the left side. Starting with late Scout IIs, disc and power brakes were standard features. Early models had disc brakes as a rarely selected option. Very few Scout II’s were ordered in RWD-only configuration, most were 4WD.

Before International discontinued the Scout in , International experimented with Scout-based minivans, station wagons, dune buggies, Hurst-built special editions (in similar fashion to the Oldsmobile Hurst/Olds and Hurst SC/Rambler), and even a small motorhome. These plans were scrapped due to the International Harvester strike of , and a lack of funds for the company to expand the Scout product line, let alone continuing production of the Scout itself.[6]

The last IH Scout was produced on October 21,

Scout II Terra and Traveler[edit]

Rear view of a IH Scout II Traveler.

The Terra and Traveler were produced from to Terras and Travelers had fiberglass tops; half-cab for the Terra or full top with hatchback-type liftgate on the Traveler. Most notably different, these models were extended by 18&#;in (46&#;cm) in the region between the door and the front of the rear wheel well.

Scout SSII (Super Scout II)[edit]

IH Scout II, with SSII doors.

The SSII (Super Scout II) was a stripped-down, off-road version introduced in February [7] It was intended to compete directly with the Jeep CJ, and was built until This model included a soft top with soft doors, windshield-mounted mirrors, plastic door inserts, special plastic grille, and a roll bar, among other options. Several SSIIs were champions on the off-road racing circuit during the late s.

Special packages offered on the Scout II[edit]

Shawnee Scout[edit]

The Shawnee Scout was to be a trim type and special-feature package model produced by Hurst Performance. This model was built by dressing up a black SSII with special tomahawk and feather decals, special seats, a black targa-style top, hard tonneau bed cover, and of course a Hurst shifter. Only three Shawnee Scouts were produced.

CVI: Custom Vehicles Incorporated[edit]

CVI: Custom Vehicles Incorporated (also associated with Good Times, Inc.) was a company located around the corner from the Ft. Wayne Scout Assembly Plant (Good Times was located in Arlington, Texas) that produced special models for IH dealers in and The special models were dressed-up Scouts with unique exterior decals and trim, center console coolers, and hood scoops. Some versions had plastic window louvers on the rear side glass, fender flares, and two different plastic tailgate inserts. Model names included the Midnitestar, Terrastar, Travelstar, Shadow, Raven, two Classic models, GMS (Green Machine Sport), GMS (Gold Medallion Scout), Hot Stuff, Trailstar, Sportstar, Liter, and Liter models.

The "Selective Edition" Scout II[edit]

This was a special package available from the factory. The –79 package order code on the line ticket was The package included special gold accent stripes, gold-spoke wheels with Goodyear Tracker A-Ts, SSII black grille insert, and Sport Steering wheel. Other options available: Choice of powertrain, seats, interior, radios, cruise control, tow packages, air conditioning, all available in exterior colors Dark Brown, Dark Blue, Black, or Green. This was available on the Travel Top, Traveler, and Terra models.

"Spirit of 76" and the "Patriot" special editions[edit]

For the US Bicentennial in , IH produced the Spirit of 76 and the Patriot models. The Spirit of 76 had a special blue soft top and blue/red side applique, and was only available on the Scout II. The Spirit also had blue interior, racing-type steering wheel, and 15x7-inch chromerally wheels. IH data only show Spirit models ever being built. Line ticket codes included:

for the side applique to omit the hard top deluxe interior blue interior color winter white exterior paint front tires rear tires with spare 7-in chrome wheels

The Patriot had a hard top and the same blue/red side applique, but was available in a Scout II, Terra, or Traveler. Sales figures on the Patriot only show one Terra, seven Travelers, and 50+ Scout IIs were manufactured. However, another undetermined number of Patriots were built without line ticket code designations (the applique was applied at the Truck Sales Processing Center), making how many were actually built difficult to determine. Nevertheless, both models can be considered extremely rare.

The "Midas Edition" Scout II[edit]

From to , IH contracted with Midas Van Conversion Co. of Elkhart, Indiana, to build special luxury models to be offered through its dealers. These vehicles had swivelbucket seats, shag carpet, color-keyed interiors, door panels, headliner, grille guards, dual sunroofs, overhead clocks, third seats, reading lights, tinted windows, fender flares, and special side appliques and paint designs. Models included the Family Cruiser (or just Cruiser), the Street Machine, and Off-Road Vehicle. Another company named Van American (Goshen, Indiana) offered similar versions to compete with Midas; however, these vehicles were only offered for a brief time, making them very rare now. See one here.

Final "Special" version[edit]

Probably one the rarest models ever produced by IH was the RS: the Special Limited Edition RS Scout. This version was only available on the Traveler in Tahitian Red (metallic). It had special extras inside and out, including polycast wheels with Tahitian Red (metallic) accent, luxurious plush all-velour russet interior including headliner and visors, special pin striping, wood-grain trim instrument panel and shift console, chrome bumpers, tinted glass, and more. Two other special versions offered in were the and Gold Star models. The offered standard equipment plus a V-8, HD clutch, T four-speed manual transmission, rear axle ratio, AM radio, rear seat, hub caps, special black side applique and paint on lower body, and black carpet, while the offered standard equipment plus engine, T three-speed transmission, rear axle ratio, black vinyl interior, AM radio, rear seat, hub caps, special black side applique and paint on lower body, and black carpet.

Monteverdi Safari[edit]

Main article: Monteverdi Safari

The Monteverdi Safari was made by Monteverdi, the Swiss brand of luxury cars, who used Scout IIs to produce well-equipped luxurious off-road station wagons. Two models were made during the late s, the Safari, which had most of the bodywork changed, and the Sahara, which featured more limited changes, i.e. new grille and a more luxurious interior. Both were available with IH's SV engine or Chrysler's LA ( or L). The Safari was also offered with Chrysler's L " RB" engine, while the lower-priced Sahara retained the Scout's original bodywork and could be had with the Nissan SD33 diesel engine.[8]

Engines[edit]

Engine produced by International Harvester:

  • IH
  • IH
  • IH SV
  • IH SV (This is not the same engine as the AMC V8)
  • IH SV

Built by American Motors Corporation

Built by Nissan

International offered the Scout with a variety of engines over its years of production. The Scout 80 (–) had the gasoline-powered four-cylinder as its standard engine. From to (Models , A, and B), engine options were the gasoline-powered four-cylinder, AMC six-cylinder, V-8, and the V A turbocharged version of the four-cylinder engine was offered from to [citation needed]

The Scout II (made between and ) had the following engine options: the 4-cylinder, 6-cylinder (early production), 6-cylinder (later production), V-8, and V International never installed a V-8 or an AMC V-8 into a Scout. At the time, International did not manufacture a diesel engine small enough to be used in the Scout, and so starting in used the Nissan SD33 diesel engine as an option. This engine was replaced by the SD33T turbo diesel engine in A very small amount of Scouts left the factory in with the Nissan SD33T turbo diesel engine.

Axles and gear ratios[edit]

Dana 27 axles were used for the front and rear wheels in the 80 and models until around Both front and rear differentials were offset to the passenger side for the purpose of lining up the driveshafts with the Dana 18 transfer case. With the transition to the A model, the rear axle was upgraded to a Dana 44, with a centered differential mated to the Dana 20 transfer case (which had replaced the Dana 18). Some Scouts from this transitional time are a mix of old and new designs, with the rear driveshaft running at an angle. The front axle was still a Dana 27 model, though if the buyer ordered the lb axle option, the front axle was upgraded to a hybrid unit built from a Dana 30 center section and 27 tubes. The V8 engine option included an automatic upgrade to the heavier-duty Dana 30 axle. The rear axle shafts changed from two pieces to one piece around or A Power-Lock limited-slip differential was provided as an option for both front and rear axles. Common gear ratios are , , or , though nearly any ratio was available by special order (in at least one instance, a Scout was shipped with a ).

In Scout IIs, Dana 30 front axles and Dana 44 rear axles were standard until , with front Dana 44 axles as a special order. After , Dana 44 front and rear axles became standard on all Scout IIs. Available gear ratios were , , , , , , , and Track-Lock limited-slip differentials were optional.

Axles originally had a tag bolted to their differential cover stamped with their gear ratio, but this tag often rusted off over time or was removed intentionally. The line ticket can be checked to identify the axle model, gear ratio, and whether it is equipped with a traction device, using an International parts code book.

Use in off-road racing[edit]

Scout SSIIs were awarded honors for off-road racing during the late s. In , Jerry Boone, of Parker, Arizona, finished first among 4x4 production vehicles in the Baja Boone completed the run in 19 hours 58 minutes, crossing the finish line at Ensenada almost 2 hours ahead of his closest competitor: a Jeep CJ7. Only 9 of 21 vehicles that started the race finished the 1,&#;km (&#;mi) course. Boone ran even faster than Class IV modified 4x4 racers. Mr. Boone later revealed that they only had a month to prepare a stock SSII for the race and they were not sponsored by IH until after the race.[citation needed] Boone also won in at Riverside, California.

Sherman Balch, among many other accomplishments in off-road racing, won the off-road "world championship" in (the SCORE event in Riverside, California). Three other finishers along with Balch also drove Scouts. Balch also won the Baja , the Mint , and three events in the fall of at Lake Geneva Raceway.

Sherman Balch and co-driver James Acker, driving a Scout SSII, later won virtually all major off-road races in offered on the West Coast/Mexico circuit by winning the Baja , the Baja , the Baja , the Mint , and the Parker (Arizona)

Line ticket[edit]

When an IH vehicle was ordered, a factory plan or construction sheet was created (when the order was sent to the factory) with the new vehicle's VIN or ID number, and all the codes for standard equipment and options that the salesman used to create this vehicle for his customer or inventory. This sheet was used to assemble the vehicle from beginning to finish. After the factory assembled the vehicle and the vehicle was shipped and sold, the line [setting] ticket identified such things as the engine type, transmission type, drive line, paint codes, gear ratio, and standard and optional equipment specific to that vehicle. Different parts were used on the same model in the same year. A very small copy of the line ticket was attached to each vehicle during the building process at the factory. The location of the ticket varied: – Scout IIs had their copies mounted under their hoods, attached to the cowl cover panels. The – Scout IIs had their copies on the inside of the glove box doors, and – pickups and Travelalls had them attached to the back of the glove boxes; depressing the keeper tabs on each side of the box lets the box swing down to reveal the ticket. If lost, line tickets can be ordered through several Scout parts specialists, due to their diligence in maintaining these valuable resources.

Scout III SSV concept vehicle[edit]

IH developed a concept prototype for the next version of the Scout in named the Scout III SSV, but due to the company's decision to discontinue the Scout product line, it was never put into production. The second prototype of the concept vehicle is displayed at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum in Auburn, Indiana. It was a two-door with a sloped back window, built on a in chassis with hp V8.

Many people call this THE Scout. The SSV meant Scout Supplemental Vehicle, meant to be a limited production supplement to the regular model to help promote it, much as the Corvette supplements the Chevrolet line. While the SSV may have appeared in if it had reached production, designs existed for a new model in to replace the Scout II. Clay models of this showed an evolution of the Scout II into a more rounded body somewhat resembling the Chevrolet S Blazer. The demise of the Scout line ended the SSV; the company continues to this day, having changed its name to Navistar in after selling the farm machinery business along with the International Harvester name. [9]

Case IH Scout[edit]

In , Case IH started production of a UTV side by side utility ATV named the Scout and Scout XL, also sold as New Holland Rustler. These UTVs were built by Club Car.[10]

Possible revival[edit]

In September , a report by Motor Trend reveled that Volkswagen Group may look to revive the Scout nameplate as a potential competitor to the Jeep Wrangler, Toyota 4Runner, and the revived Ford Bronco. VW Group had acquired the Scout trademarks earlier in the year when its commercial truck business Traton acquired Navistar. As VW Group is unlikely to acquire the International Harvester trademarks from Case IH even for a licensing deal, a revived Scout would either be sold under the Volkswagen nameplate as a sub-brand similar to the aforementioned Bronco or as a standalone off-road themed brand similar to Jeep; both options would utilize VW's existing dealership network in the United States. A revived Scout would also be all-electric.[11]

References[edit]

  • Crismon, Frederick W. (), International Trucks (2nd&#;ed.), Minneapolis, MN: Victory WW2 Publishing, ISBN&#;
  1. ^Crismon, p.
  2. ^ abCrismon, p.
  3. ^Crismon, p.
  4. ^Crismon, p.
  5. ^Crismon, p.
  6. ^Strohl, Daniel (). "Just before the axe fell, International wanted to try Scout-based coupes, minivans, campers, and luxury trucks". Hemmings Auto Blog. Retrieved
  7. ^"I-H offers off-road Scout". Chicago Tribune: W_B
  8. ^Lösch, Annamaria, ed. (). World Cars . Pelham, NY: The Automobile Club of Italy/Herald Books. pp.&#;– ISBN&#;.
  9. ^http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php//11/17/international-history-in-auburn-museum/
  10. ^http://www.agcanada.com/grainews//11/09/cnh-adds-utility-vehicles/
  11. ^"An International Scout with a VW Badge?". 20 September

Further reading[edit]

  • Allen, Jim; Glancy, John (). International Scout Encyclopedia: The Authoritative Guide to IH's Legendary 4x4. Octane Press. ISBN&#;.
  • Banks, Michael. International Harvester Scout: The Complete Illustrated History. Enthusiast Books, ISBN&#;
  • Foster, Patrick. International Harvester Trucks, The Complete History. Motorbooks, ISBN&#;

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Harvester_Scout

You will also be interested:

You&#;ve likely seen them, the agonizingly aggrandized 4x4s, the overstocked overlanders, the off roader that has no business being on a city street &#; the last five years have seen a surge in the popularity of vehicles with a sense of adventure in their builds, especially those that have had their rust spots buffed out and received a glossy new coat of paint. Even if it is the result of the age of spectacle and measuring success with Instagram likes, a lover of cars can&#;t help but admit that the reemergence and return to form for these bastions of 4WD is, objectively, a beautiful thing. Of the pantheon of respected 4WD steeds &#; the ilk of the Land Rover Defenders, Chevy Blazers, Ford Broncos, Jeep CJ-5s and Toyota FJ40s of the world &#; the International Harvester Scout was second to none in its heyday. Today, the Scout holds a uniquely revered status, in large part due to the fact that a new one hasn&#;t been made for decades. The Scout only enjoyed a brief moment in the sun, a shade under two decades. As with anything, the limited nature of the Scout makes it more sought after, especially when considering the somewhat purposefully obscure tastes of many 4&#;4 seekers today. That&#;s no knock &#; just a plain fact. The Internationa Harvester Scout came from obscurity, and its humble roots certainly contribute to its preciousness.

Roving the earth in the years between to , the InternationalHarvester Scout sprung from an agrarian ancestry. Built by the agricultural company International Harvester, which had made its mark as a manufacturer of machinery for the farm, construction equipment, and trucks &#; sometimes of the more outlandish variety &#; the International Harvester Scout was the precursor to the modern SUV.

To trace the roots of the International Harvester company, you have to go back nearly years, to , when inventor and Virginian Cyrus McCormick patented his design for the horse-drawn reaper. Beginning as McCormick Harvesting Machine Company, the company became a success in the world of agricultural machinery. It wasn&#;t until the industrialist and capitalist titan J.P. Morgan stepped in to finance a merger between McCormick Harvesting Machine Company, Deering Harvester Company, Milwaukee Harvesting Machine Co., Plano Manufacturing Co., and Warder, Bushnell, and Glessner, that International Harvester was properly established.

In , the company deviated from its bailwick to start producing light trucks, beginning with their Model A &#;Auto Buggy.&#; IH would continue to make trucks for the next 70 years. Among the most popular trucks they made was the International Harvester Travelall, manufactured from the years to , ultimately eclipsed by the Scout. The company also produced several vehicles for the US Navy and Marines during WWII.

Scout At War

IH built several impressively rugged vehicles for the US military. The first was the International Harvester M Half Ton Cargo Truck, which was produced beginning in It was followed shortly by their M One-Ton 4&#;4. Around 10, of the Full Ton trucks were produced, and 1, of the half-tons were produced before being completely replaced. There was also the M ton-and-a-half 4&#;4 as well as several militarized 4&#;2 semi-tractors, artillery tractors, and even an experimental tank called the T Trucks, tractors and specialty machinery vehicles were IH&#;s bread and butter for many years. It wasn&#;t until that IH harvested gold with the Scout, which would cement a perception in the car world and public conscious that was far from farmy.

The International Harvester Scout is often considered, if not the first SUV made than among progenitors to the modern Sports Utility Vehicle and four by four classes. Built as a rival to the two-door Jeep CJ 4x4s, which had emerged from the ghost of the Willys-Overlanders of the &#;40s and early &#;50s, the first International Harvester Scout, the Scout 80, debuted in late

In , International Harvester began to develop a vehicle, as they said, designed &#;to replace the horse.&#; Something utilitarian and reliable, but not as sparse and austere as the Willys/Jeep military-style wagons which filled that niche at the time, though were far from being commercially explosive. The Scout 80s were built to be more hospitable than their more spartan counterparts; sliding side windows, a fold-down windshield, vacuum windshield wipers that swiped from top to bottom, and a comfortable if plain interior were featured on the model 80, which was produced from to The Scout 80 ran on a normally aspirated cubic-inch four-cylinder engine, generating around 93 horsepower.

IH produced models with travel-top hardtop, sport-top soft top, and cab-top roofs, each model featuring a pickup style bed. Marketed as a vehicle of astounding versatility, IH boasted that in minutes a Scout can transform into &#;a station wagon, a convertible, a light-duty hauler, a runabout&#; (which is a term that desperately needs to be brought back). In the half-decade during which the model 80 was produced, the company made just over , units. They celebrated the K landmark with the special edition Red Carpet Scout 80, a pearlescent white model with a red interior. Only 3, were ever produced, and good luck finding one today.

Scout 80 Campermobile

Camp culture in the s and early &#;60s was huge. The Scout 80 helped foment the enthusiasm for the outdoors with its special Campermobile variant, released in Among the rarest variants out there, you&#;d be lucky to find one of these out there, and luckier still if it was in reputable shape. The quintessential 80s all-integrated camp vehicle was cutting edge for its time, with sleeping bunks that folded out of the sides, a built in dinette set, stand-up galley, and toilet. Due to the scarcity of orders, few were produced, and even fewer bought. Shoddy manufacturing led the Campermobile to be prone to falling apart in rough terrain, and little affection from the public for the design led to fewer than being purchased.

The Scout 80 ignited International Scout&#;s popularity. It needed a mighty successor to fill its shoes, and the Scout was the champion IH produced. The first model was produced from to , and offered an upgrade in comfort and aesthetics. This meant the addition of bucket seats, new instrumentation and heating systems, a redesigned interior and the optional inclusion of backseats. Beginning in , IH offered the first vehicle with a V8 engine.

A

In , International Harvester released the Scout A to replace the original More internal amenities were added, and continuing the tradition of the &#;Doll Up Scout&#; luxury model offered on 80 and bases &#; called the Champagne Series, the International Harvester offered an &#;Aristocrat A&#; model, accessorized by a stainless steel roof rack, rally wheels, and a two-tone blue and silver paint job.

B

The B model replaced the A in August of and ran for just 8 months until March of The B only received very minor upgrades. The short-lived Scout iteration was the last car produced in a prosperous decade for IH. All told, the International Harvester Scout outsold total Jeep sales in the decade, making the Scout the 4&#;4 of the &#;60s.

The Scout II came onto the scene in , marking a new decade for the International Harvester Scout. Though it would prove to be the last decade for the 4 x 4, that was no result of the Scout II&#;s performance. The Scout II &#; today a highly sought after relic &#; received several noteworthy changes in design, including the a new front grille design. Electronic ignition was added to the V8 engine, and the wheelbase sat about three inches lower than the and 80 models. Saginaw power steering was also added. In , the 4-cylinder engine was permanently abandoned by all Scouts, replaced by 4-cylinder engine. Also becoming standard to the Scout II were Dana 44 axles and power disc brakes.

Scout Traveler And Terra

Variants like the Scout Traveler and Scout Terra came along in with extended wheelbases, both measuring around inches, in comparison to the Scout II&#;s inch base. Manufactured from to , the two variants also featured fiberglass tops.

SSII

The Super Scout II, or SSII, is an especially sought after cult classic from the revered Scout Line for its raw and stripped-down style that appealed to the advent of adventurers when the 4&#;4 fad started experiencing a Renaissance. Introduced in February , the SSII was built, like the OG Scout 80, as a competitor to a Jeep model. By the mid to late &#;70s, Jeep had eclipsed IHS in popularity. Outside of the commercial realm and into the world of racing, the SSII saw plenty of success.

Scout Racing

Jimmy Ray Jones was a professional electrician and amateur off-road racer in San Diego during the s. In , Jones purchased a Scout A V8 and fell in love. Enthralled by the mighty International Harvester Scout, he entered in a pro race, the NORRA (National Off Road Racing Association) Baja , taking home 13th place. He sold the A in and moved up a weight class, to a Scout II 4 x 2. The same year, he won the 4 x 2 class in the Baja , and suddenly IHS was a name in racing.

The biggest win an International Harvester Scout race car ever took home? In , an unsponsored Jerry Boone drove an International Super Scout II to victory in the 4&#;4 class at the Baja , completing the run in 19 hours and 58 minutes, triumphing by almost two hours over the Jeep CJ7 &#; a final victory for the Scout, which would be discontinued three years later. Racing continued for years after Scout&#;s commercial discontinuation, however, and in drivers Sherman Balch and James Acker would win almost all of the major off road races of the year &#; the Baja , the Baja , the Baja , the Mint , and the Parker &#; driving a Scout SSII.

Making A Comeback

Scout Out The Scrap Heap

The International Harvester Scout finally ended production in The vehicle&#;s demise is attributed to a variety of factors, including the United Auto Workers’ strike, and a general inability to compete with Detroit’s Big Three auto manufacturers (General Motors, Ford, and Fiat Chrysler, the latter of which makes Jeep).

All told, , IH Scouts were produced in the period of , and it remains one of the forebears of the modern SUV. Still its discontinuation hasn&#;t stopped from adherents of the adventure vehicle from continuing to love it. Scouts are making a comeback, with customizers like New Legend taking the old Scouts from the scrap heap and bringing them up for the present moment. The ultimate dark horse in the 4 x 4 world is returning, though not from the dead. Call it a respite, a brief sabbatical, a year beauty nap, because the fact is legends never die.

The 15 Best Adventure Vehicles

If an International Harvester Scout is your cup of tea, then this list of the best adventure vehicles will be right up your alley.

HiConsumption is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

Sours: https://hiconsumption.com/history-of-the-international-scout-harvester/


233 234 235 236 237