Stanford history education group

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Posts tagged &#;stanford history education group&#;

You want kids to have skills. Read Inquire Write can help.

Last week, I got the chance to work with about 25 teachers and educators from around the state as we started the process of revising our state social studies standards. Long time readers will recall a similar process from seven years ago.

At the time, the Kansas state standards were very much the same as other state level standards documents. The focus was on the details of history &#; people and places and dates. Assessments tried to incorporate critical thinking but since the entire test was multiple choice, it was difficult to measure high levels of thinking and problem solving.

To be successful on this type of high stakes state assessment, teachers shifted to a drill and kill,  memorize specific pieces of content out of context instructional strategies. These strategies increased test scores but lowered student engagement, failed to create critical thinkers, and didn&#;t prepare kids to become informed citizens.

So we started from scratch.

The process resulted in a brand new set of standards that shifted instructional focus from memorizing details to one that encouraged analyzing evidence, solving problems, and sharing solutions. We created five big ideas that acted as our standards. We adapted reading, writing, and communication expectations and instruction best practices to guide local curriculum development. And we left the specific content up to each district.

Teachers appreciated the freedom to focus on the doing of social studies rather than asking kids to memorize minutiae. But this &#;new&#; style of teaching can be time consuming and difficult. The old standards had trained both our kids and our teachers that drill and kill was acceptable &#; now we were asking that instruction and assessment look different.

And teachers had questions. What does this sort of teaching look like? How do you assess the learning? How long should it take? If we don&#;t have to &#;cover&#;so much content, what content is important enough to focus on? What resources are available?

Back in , as the revised document rolled out, there weren&#;t a ton of examples and resources out there that supported this kind of inquiry based teaching model. But around the country, others were having similar conversations:

Things got better.

And now, if you&#;re looking for examples, resources, lessons, student samples, and rubrics, things are looking even rosier. Read more

Sours: https://historytech.wordpress.com/tag/stanford-history-education-group/

History Assessments — Stanford History Education Group

Stanford History Education Group’s history lessons, assessments, and curricula focus on how young people evaluate online content and help students develop the skills needed to navigate the current digital landscape. Designed for middle and high school teachers and students; free registration is required to access additional curricular materials.


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Sours: https://www.historians.org/
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Stanford History Education Group

  • RH

    Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

  • RH

    Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

  • RH

    Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).

  • RH

    Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

  • RH

    Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

  • RH

    Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

  • RH

    By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

  • RH

    Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

  • RH

    Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

  • RH

    Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.

  • RH

    Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

  • RH

    Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.

  • RH

    Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

  • RH

    Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

  • RH

    Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.

  • RH

    Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

  • RH

    Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

  • RH

    Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

  • RH

    Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • RH

    Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

  • RH

    Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

  • RH

    Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

  • RH

    Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • RH

    Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

  • RH

    Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

  • Sours: https://www.commonsense.org/education/website/stanford-history-education-group
    Beyond the Bubble: Historical Knowledge

    Stanford History Education Group

    If young people are not prepared to critically evaluate the information that bombards them online, they are apt to be duped by false claims and misleading arguments. To help teachers address these critical skills, we’ve developed assessments of civic online reasoning—the ability to judge the credibility of digital information about social and political issues.

    These assessments ask students to reason about online content. We’ve designed paper-and-pencil tasks as well as tasks that students complete online. These assessments are intended for flexible classroom use. We hope teachers use the tasks to design classroom activities, as the basis for discussions about digital content, and as formative assessments to learn more about students’ progress as they learn to evaluate online information. These tasks came out of research with thousands of students from across the country.

    As part of MediaWise, the Stanford History Education Group is developing and evaluating new civic online reasoning lesson plans for middle and high school students. The lessons will be available fall

    The Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) is a research and development group based in Stanford’s Graduate School of Education. In , they set out to develop short assessments to gauge young people’s ability to evaluate online content. Their work was supported by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and the Silver Giving Foundation.

    Specifically, they sought to measure Civic Online Reasoning — the ability to effectively search for, evaluate, and verify social and political information online. They use this term to highlight the civic aims of this work. The ability to evaluate online content has become a prerequisite for thoughtful democratic participation.
    (Copied from website)

    Sours: https://counteringdisinformation.org/interventions/stanford-history-education-group

    Group education stanford history

    Buns. Smearing the gel on the bottom and thighs, his movements became more and more energetic. Lera just wanted to relax, giving herself a few seconds for the body to rest and taste all the charm of male affection.

    Civic Online Reasoning in the Classroom

    I did not see anything suspicious, but just in case I followed her, keeping at a distance. I didn't know what to do next - to leave everything as it is and try to forget the words that never left my. Head, or. I suddenly looked at my mother's legs and tensed again.

    I remembered exactly that she walked here in trousers.

    Now discussing:

    Dominica physically felt a breath of energy. The bodies made the usual movements, up and down, out and in, to the side, in depth. Squeeze, release, rise, fall. The brain was floating away.



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