Working with tables in indesign

Working with tables in indesign DEFAULT

Adobe InDesign CC - Tables



InDesign provides several ways of working with tables. You can create a table from scratch within a text frame or convert an existing data into a table. Note that the table created will be an anchored object for the text frame.

Creating a New Table

To create a new table, simply select the Text tool and draw an area that you want to create as a table.

Create Table

Then go to the Tables menu and select Create Table… to open the Create Table dialog box. Here, you can specify the number of rows and columns that you want in your table and also specify if you need headers and footers for the table. Clicking OK will create the table within your text frame.

Create Table Dialog Box

You can now enter data within this table. Moving the cursor over any of the rows or columns will allow you to resize the row or column. Use Shift and drag outside of the table to adjust the entire table proportionally.

Remember that to drag the rows or columns, you need the Type tool selected on the toolbar as the table is considered to be a text frame. If you use the Selection tool, it will move the whole text frame instead of just the row or column.

To delete the table, simply drag over the table and press Delete on your keyboard.

Creating a Table from Existing Data

Most of the time, it makes sense to convert an existing data into a table. You can import a Word, Excel, Access (database) file, or even a text document and convert the contents into a table.

Use the Text tool to create the text frame for your table. Then, use the Place command to place your data into the text frame.

In the following example, we will use a simple text file containing information about websites of some pharma companies and convert this into a table.

Pharma Companies

Select all the contents of the text frame by clicking the text and pressing Ctrl+A on Windows or Command+A on the Mac. Go to the Table menu and select the Convert Text to Table… option to open the Convert Text to Table dialog box.

You need to tell InDesign what it should consider as a row and column separator. For now, the defaults will work. Click OK to create the table.

Convert Text to Tables

We see that InDesign has created a table with the given data.

CompanyWebsite
Krebshttp://www.krebsbiochem.com/unit2_research.htm
Divis Labshttp://www.divislabs.com/inside/productionblock2.asp
Mylanmylanlabs.in
Corneliushttp://www.cornileus.com/career.html
Dr.Reddyshttp://www.dreddys.com
Raks Pharmarakspharma.com
Avraavralab.com

You can edit the contents of each cell just like how you would edit a regular text frame. If you want an even distribution of rows and columns, you can simply select the rows or columns and go to the Table menu and select either Distribute Rows Evenly or Distribute Columns Evenly or both.

Formatting Tables

InDesign gives plenty of options to format the layout of the table.

All table formatting options are accessible from the Table Options dialog box. To access this, simply go to the Table menu, then go to the Table Options submenu and choose Table Setup…

Formatting Tables

From here, you can choose how your borders should look like and what should be their stroke, how you want individual rows and columns to be colored and a whole lot more. It is easy to explore the options and change the necessary settings.

For this example, let us see the final output after doing some basic formatting. Before doing this, it would be a good practice to define the first row of the table as the header. To do this, go to the Table menu, then to the Convert Rows submenu and select, To Header. This is useful when you have a table spanning multiple pages and it helps to have the header on all the pages for easy reference.

Well Formatted Table

Now, we have a table that is reasonably well formatted. You can explore further options in the Table Options dialog box to adjust the formatting to your liking.

Sours: https://www.tutorialspoint.com/adobe_indesign_cc/adobe_indesign_cc_tables.htm

Making tables look good in InDesign

Add color to a table in InDesign.You’ve imported your table or spreadsheet from Word or Excel into InDesign, and made a few adjustments to the text and columns following our previous blog post, Want to import from Excel into InDesign? Your table probably looks okay (i.e., readable), but does it rock your world? Not so much.

There are lots of ways to make tables look good in InDesign. In this blog post, we’ll take you through the steps to create a simple yet attractive greyscale or color table. We’ll start by explaining InDesign’s cell and table styles, as they provide an easy way to make all the tables in your book consistent.

Cell styles 101

Cell styles specify the amount of space around the text in a cell, and also which paragraph style is used within that cell. A simple table might have just two cell styles, one for the cells in the header row and one for all the other cells.

Take a moment now to set up two cell styles for your table: a Header cell style and a Text cell style. First open your Cell Styles panel by choosing Window>Styles>Cell Styles. Using the Type Tool, click in one of the cells in your header row to put your cursor there. Create a new cell style by clicking the fly-out menu in your Cell Styles panel and choosing New Cell Style. In the Style Name box at the top, name your style Header, and in the Paragraph Style drop-down box, choose the paragraph style you’ve created for your header row. (If you set up your table based on our previous blog post, your paragraph style for column heads will be called tch.) Then click OK.

Make your table look good in InDesign

Making tables look good in InDesignNow apply the Header cell style to your header row by selecting the whole row with your Type Tool (hover at the left of the row to show the black arrow, then click to select the whole row), then select Header in your Cell Styles panel to apply the cell style. Done.

Next repeat the steps above to create a new cell style for the regular text cells in your table. Using the Type Tool, click in one of the cells in your table to put your cursor there. Create a new cell style by clicking the fly-out menu in your Cell Styles panel and choosing New Cell Style. In the Style Name box at the top, name your style Text, and in the Paragraph Style drop-down box, choose the paragraph style you’ve created for your table text. (If you set up your table based on our previous blog post, your paragraph style for column heads will be called tb.) Then click OK.

Making tables look good in InDesign

Making tables look good in InDesignNow apply the Text cell style to all the rows below your header row by selecting them with your Type Tool (hover at the left of the uppermost row to show the black arrow, then click and drag down to the bottom of the table to select all the remaining rows), then select Text in your Cell Styles panel to apply the cell style. Done.

As you design your table, you may need to create another cell style or two, but you can cross that bridge when you come to it. If a particular column needs to be right-aligned or centered, you’ll create a new cell style for those particular cells and apply it. But you’re off to a good start.

Table styles 101

Table styles specify the overall look of your table, including its border, row and column strokes, and fills. To create a table style for your table, first open your Table Styles panel by choosing Window>Styles>Table Styles. Using the Type Tool, select your whole table by hovering at the top left corner of the table to see the diagonal black arrow, then click to select the table. Create a new table style by clicking the fly-out menu in your Table Styles panel and choosing New Table Style. In the Style Name box at the top, name your style (we’ve used Table 1 in this example). In the Cell Styles area at the bottom of the dialog box, choose Header for your Header Rows cell style, and Text for all the other rows. Then click OK.

Make a table look good in InDesign

Make a table look good in InDesignNow apply the new table style to your table by selecting the whole table with your Type Tool as explained above, then select Table 1 in your Table Styles panel to apply the table style. Done.

Next we’ll walk you through creating a simple grayscale or color table using the example from our previous blog post as a starting point.

A simple grayscale table

This table looks nice in grayscale and makes a change from the traditional boxes-around-each-cell format:

Create a greyscale table in InDesign.

Here’s how to adjust your table style to get this look:

Start by adding a dark gray fill to your header row. Open your Header cell style by double-clicking it in your Cell Styles panel, then choose Strokes and Fills on the left. In the Cell Stroke area there is a diagram of a cell, probably showing all four sides in blue (the default). Note in the screenshot below that only the left and right sides of the cell are blue. Deselect the top and bottom of your cell by clicking on the blue lines (they’ll turn grey as shown below and will no longer be selected). Then fill in the rest of the dialog box as shown below. This means that the left and right sides of each cell are selected and they will have the 1 pt white stroke applied to them. At the bottom in the Cell Fill area, you’ll choose the background fill color for your header row. Then click OK.

Making tables look good in InDesign

Now open your Table style by double-clicking it in your Table Styles panel. You’ll use your Table style to control the fills and strokes for the rest of your table, choosing whether or not to include fills and strokes and, if so, what colors and thicknesses they’ll be.

In your Table Style Options dialog box, first choose Table Setup on the left. In the Table Border area, choose None from the Type drop-down menu to turn off any border around your table. All the other choices will be grayed out after you select None.

Create a greyscale table in InDesign Next choose Row Strokes on the left. This particular table does not use any row strokes, so you’ll need to turn them off. Choose Every Other Row from the Alternating Pattern drop-down menu, then choose None from both Type drop-down menus. Once you’ve done this, all the other choices will be grayed out.

Creating a greyscale table in InDesign.

Next choose Column Strokes on the left. This particular table does not use any column strokes, so you’ll need to turn them off. Choose Every Other Column from the Alternating Pattern drop-down menu, then choose None from both Type drop-down menus. Once you’ve done this, all the other choices will be grayed out.

Create a greyscale table in InDesign.

Finally, choose Fills on the left. This table has alternating rows of gray, so choose Every Other Row from the Alternating Pattern drop-down menu. In the Alternating section, fill in the choices shown below. The First alternating row has a fill of 10% black, which means that regular text will be easy to read on top of this light grey background. The Next alternating row has no fill color. If the Preview box at the bottom left is checked, you’ll see the changes in your table, with the first row below your header row without color, and the second row with color, and so on. If you’d prefer that the first row below the header row have color instead, then change the number in the Skip First box to 1 Row. Click OK.

Create a greyscale table in InDesign.

And now your table is done!

Adding color to your table

You may want to tweak your table a bit to polish it. We added some color to our table shown below: we changed the fill color of the header row to magenta (by choosing a different fill color in the Header cell style as shown above); we changed the text color in the header row to white (by changing the Character Color to Paper in our tch paragraph style); and we changed the text color in the left column to magenta (by creating a new character style called Magenta and applying it to that text).

Add color to a table in InDesign.

So there are lots of choices for adding color to a table like this one, and yet it still looks nice and will print just fine in a book printed with black ink only. Experiment with color and text changes by changing your styles (paragraph, character, cell and table styles). And if you make a change you don’t like, simply undo it by pressing Ctrl/Cmd+Z.

3 blog posts to help you with tables

We hope our set of three blog posts about setting up tables in InDesign will help you get started with your own tables.

Want to import from Excel into InDesign? explains:

  • importing a spreadsheet from Excel into InDesign
  • changing widths of columns to fit a book page
  • adding a header row that repeats from page to page
  • creating paragraph styles for columns heads and text
  • aligning text within table cells
  • copying and pasting a table into main narrative flow of text

This blog post explains:

  • creating and applying cell styles for header and text rows
  • creating and applying a table style
  • setting up alternating row colors for a modern-looking table
  • adding color to table cells and text

Adding images and numbers to tables in InDesign explains:

  • adding a second header row to include a table title
  • adding images to table cells
  • aligning numbers in columns
  • creating new cell styles for use in other tables

If you have any questions or comments, we’ll welcome your thoughts in the Comments below. Happy designing!

Book Design Made Simple. You can do it yourself.

Filed Under: InDesignTagged With: color, tables

Sours: https://www.bookdesignmadesimple.com/making-tables-look-good-in-indesign/
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Tables organize information into rows and columns. If you're familiar with word processing programs, then you probably already have a good idea of what a table is. As we said, a table is made up of rows and columns. The point where a row and column intersect is called a cell.

The table pictured below has four rows and four columns.

We've circled one of the cells in red:

You can put text in a cell, or you can also put graphics and other objects. In InDesign, you can make a table from scratch or you can create one from text separated by tabs, paragraphs, or commas.

This article is going to be devoted to teaching you how to create and work with tables in Adobe InDesign.

Create a Table

The first step in creating a table is to draw a text frame - or box - where you want the table to appear. Use the Type tool to do this, as we've done below. The text frame appears in blue.

Next, go to Table>Insert Table.

You'll see the Insert Table dialogue box.

  • Enter how many rows and columns you want the table to have.

  • Enter how many header rows and footer rows you want the table to have.

  • Then, select a table style from the Table Style dropdown menu.

We've selected 10 rows and 10 columns for our table. We've also selected one header and one footer row.

Entering Text into a Table

You enter text into a table by using the Type tool and clicking in the cell where you want to start adding text. To move from one cell to the next, use the Tab key on your keyboard.

Adding Rows and Columns

To add rows and columns to a table that's already been created, you can go to Table>Insert, then select Row or Column.

Let's insert a row. First, click in a cell that will serve as your insertion point. Use the Type tool to do this. Then go to Table>Insert.

As you can see in the above dialogue, InDesign asks how many rows you want to insert. Then, it wants to know if you want the new row above or below the row where you've made the insertion point.

Enter your specifications, then click OK.

To delete a row or table, specify the row or column you want to delete by using the Type tool to enter an insertion point, then go to Table>Delete, then choose Row or Column.

You can also use the Table panel to add rows and columns. Go to Window>Type & Tables>Table.

You can see in the panel that we have ten rows (horizontal) and ten columns (vertical). To add one row or column, simply change the number to eleven. It will add a new row or column to the bottom of your table if you add a row - or the right side of your table if you add a column.

Adjusting Rows and Columns

You can also use the Table panel to adjust the size of your rows and columns. Right now, we see that our rows are at least 0p3 in height.

We can increase this size if we want by clicking the up and down arrows here: .

Or we can click here for more options: and choose "Exactly" so all of our rows are exactly the same size.

We can adjust the width of our columns as well: .

Aligning Content in Table Cells

You can insert text or graphics into a cell. To place graphics, you can use the Place command, Copy/Paste, or the Content Collector. Once you place content in a cell, however, you may want to adjust the spacing of the content so it's positioned where you want it.

To adjust the spacing of graphics or text in a cell, select the cells that you want to adjust.

Then, go to Table>Cell Options>Text.

Click the Preview check box to see changes as you make them.

Next, select your options.

  •         Cell insets is the spacing size for the top, bottom, left, and right areas inside the cell. If you want more space around the inside of the cell, increase this number.
  •         Vertical justification specifies an alignment position for vertical text that's in a cell.
  •         Paragraph spacing limit is the space between the lines or pargraphs in a cell.
  •         First baseline. Set an option to control where the first text baseline appears in a cell.
  •         Clipping for graphics. Choose Clip Contents to Cell to keep the size of the graphics to fit the cell. Otherwise, if the graphic is larger than the cell, it will appear outside of cell boundaries.
  •         Text rotation. If you want a rotation angle for the contents, specify it.

    Click OK when you're finished.

    Adding Strokes and Fills to a Table

    Every table you create automatically has a stroke. The stroke creates the rows and columns, which create the cells. However, you can adjust the stroke color and style. In addition, you can also add fill.

    Setting Stroke Drawing Order

    Will a row stroke appear over a column stroke in your table? Or will it be vice versa? You can influence the appearance of your table by setting the drawing order of your strokes.

    First, select the cells that you want to format.

    Go to Table>Table Options>Table Setup.

    Go to the Stroke Drawing Order section toward the bottom of the dialogue box.

    Click Preview to see changes as you make them.

    In the Draw field, choose option.

  •         Best Joins allows InDesign choose how to display strokes.
  •         Row Strokes in Front means row strokes will go over column strokes.
  •         Column Strokes in Front means column strokes will go over row strokes.
  •         InDesign 2.0 Compability means InDesign will use Best Joins for border and Row Strokes for the interior of the table.

    Click OK when you're finished.

     

    Add Strokes or Fills to Cells

    To add stroke or fill to cells, select the cells that you want to format. Remember to use the Type tool.

    Go to Table>Cell Options>Strokes and Fills.

    Set your options for strokes and fills:

    Weight specifies the thickness of the stroke.

    Type is the type of stroke.

    Color and Tint refers to the color and tint for the stroke. Select Overprint Stroke to apply it.

    Gap Color and Tint is if you select a stroke type with dashes or dots. You must specify a gap color for the space between the lines and tint for the stroke. Select Overprint Gap to apply it.

    Color and Tint for the Fill. Choose a color and tint for the fill. Select Overprint Fill to apply it.

    Click OK when you're finished.

    Here is how we set our options:

    Here is our table with the new stroke and fill colors:

     

    To Make Row and Column Strokes Different Colors

    Go to Table>Table Options>Alternating Row Strokes or Alternating Column Strokes.

    Choose an alternating pattern, then set your options. Click OK when you're finished.

    Click the Column Strokes tab to set column strokes.

     

    Set a Fill Pattern

    To set different fills for different cells, go to Table Options>Alternating Fills.

    Choose an alternating pattern, then set your colors and other options. Click OK when you're finished.

    Import Microsoft Word or Excel Tables

    If you want to import a table from MS Word or MS Excel, use the Place command (File>Place).

    Find t

    he file you want to import. Select your import options.

  •  
  • Packaging and Printing




    Print a Document

    To print a document, go to File>Print.

    Click the Print Preset downward arrow and select a preset.

    Next, choose the printer you want to use.

    Now click the PPD list arrow. If there's a PPD available, select one. A PPD is a PostScript Printer Description. It's a printer driver and a specific file used by commercial printers to define the device. If you select a PPD, click Save Preset, pick a name and location, and click Save.

    Choose your other options for printing using the tabs on the left hand side of the page.

    The Setup tab (pictured below) is where you'll set the options for your paper.

    The Marks and Bleed tab (shown below) gives options for marks and bleeds.

    The Output tab (below) is where you control your ink.

    The Graphics tab lets you set options for images and fonts.

    The Color Management tab (below) is where you control your colors.

    When you've set your options, click Print.

    The Preflight Panel

    Before you print anything or send one of your documents for someone to print or publish (digitally), you should always be sure your documents are error free. InDesign has an error-catching feature built in that will allow you to discover missing files or fonts, low resolution images, or overset text. You do this using the Preflight panel and Live Preflight.

    To do this, go to Window>Output>Preflight.

    You'll then see the Preflight panel:

     We're going to cover it more in-depth. The first thing you should do when using InDesign and Preflight for the first time(s) is create Preflight profiles. This will make checking future documents for errors more efficient and easy.

     

    Create a Preflight Profile

    To create a Preflight Profile, go to the Options menu on the Preflight panel, then Define Profiles.

    Now, click the New Preflight Profile button that looks like this: .

    Enter a name for the new profile in Profile Name.

    Click the triangles to expand each category listed below the profile name. Select the options you want. These are the elements that Preflight will check for errors.

    Click OK.

    When you work with the Preflight panel, you can now select a profile to custom-check your documents for errors.

    The profile we created is circled in red below:

    `Now, go to the Preflight panel and click Embed. It's located to the right of the Profile dropdown box we just showed you.

     

    How to Use the Preflight Panel

    To use the Preflight panel, do any of the following:

          

  • Enable Preflight by turning it on. Disable it by turning it off.    
  • Select a Profile. Select a profile to use.
  • Resolve Errors. Double-click the row or page number, then click the Info arrow to view the error and suggestions to resolve it.
  • Limit Number of Rows Per Error. Go to the Options menu, point to Limit Number of Rows Per Error, then select No Limits.
  • Specify Pages. Specify a page to check or use All.
  • Set Preflight Options. Go to the Options menu, click Preflight Options, then specify options for a profile.
  • Create a PDF Report. Go to the Options menu, then click Save Report. Enter a name and location, then click Save.

    Creating a Package for Output

    When you package your files for output, you gather all files that are related to your document or book. These include linked graphics and fonts. You can also have problems displayed during the packaging process. A package is simply a folder that contains your document, linked graphics, and InDesign content. It also includes text files, fonts, and a customized report.

    To create a package for output:

    Go to File>Package.

    In the above snasphot, we can see our errors.

    Put a check in the Show Data for Hidden and Non-Printing Layers to show these data and layers in the package.

    Go to the Fonts category and check the Show Problems Only box to view problems with the font. If there are problems, select the font, then click Find Font to find and fix those problems.

    Next, select the Links and Images category and select Show Problems Only. Click Update to locate and fix the problem or Repair All.

    Select the Colors and InksPrint Settings, and External Plug-ins categories and view the settings.

    Create a report by clicking Report. Enter a name and location, then click Save.

    Click Package.

    You'll now see the Printing Insturctions Dialogue box. Fill out the information for the printer, then click Continue.

    Select a location on your computer to save the package, then click Package.

    InDesign then packages your document. You can send this package to the printer.

Sours: https://www.universalclass.com/articles/computers/how-to-organize-and-use-tables-in-adobe-indesign.htm
InDesign 2021 Tutorial - Creating and Formatting Tables and Creating Interactive Forms

Tables in InDesign - Learn how to create or insert them in your documents

Intro - working with InDesign tables ...

For years I was convinced that InDesign was a great software if you only had to create beautiful layouts but that it was really bad if you wanted a little bit of automation. No thought ever turned out to be so wrong! InDesign has many features that allow you to automate certain tasks (such as GREP and scripts),  or automatically set styles to your content (paragraph styles). And working with tables in InDesign is beautiful when you learn how to do so.

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In this post we will see:

  • How to create a table in InDesign
  • How to convert text to table in InDesign
  • How to link a file Excel to InDesign - part 2
  • Editing tables in InDesign from Excel - part 2
  • How to create table styles in InDesign - part 3 (with a template you can download)
  • Useful shortcuts (summarised in every post)

How to create a table in InDesign

There are essentially three ways to create a table in InDesign.
You can:

  1. Convert text to table in InDesign
  2. Create a text frame and insert a table into InDesign
  3. Import Excel into InDesign — and also import a linking spreadsheet that you can update from Excel

Method 1: Convert text to table in InDesign

These instructions are especially useful when you:

  • copy table from Word to InDesign
  • copy table from Excel to InDesign

The simplest way to import a table from Word to InDesign is by copying the table from Word and then pasting it into InDesign (the same goes for Excel).Import table from word to InDesign: copy table from Word to InDesign

Immediately, when you import the Excel/Word table to InDesign, the software converts the table into text and separates columns by tabulations and rows by paragraph returns.
Import table from Word to InDesign: copy table from Word to InDesign

To convert the text to table, you need to use the feature in InDesign “Convert text to table”:

Select the entire text you just copied.
Import table from Word to InDesign: select the text to convert to table

Click on in the main menu bar and click on .
Import table from Word to InDesign: convert text to table

Set Column Separator, Row Separator, and Table Style (more about InDesign Table Styles later - in part 3). In this case, the default is just fine. Click .
Import table from Word to InDesign: column and row separator

Here you have imported a Word table to InDesign, and you are ready to set the layout of your table.
Import table from Word to InDesign: Word table to InDesign

30 Tips for InDesign

Method 2: Create a text frame and insert a table into InDesign

Of course, you can also draw a table in InDesign directly. This is probably the most common method to create a table in InDesign. Be aware, though, that you can also link a table in Excel to InDesign (I’ll show you that in part 2 of this series, after we’ve seen how to import an Excel file into InDesign).

Follow these instructions to draw a table in InDesign:

Create a text-frame in InDesign.
How to draw a table in InDesign: create the text-frame

Click on in the main menu bar and click on
How to draw a table in InDesign: Click on Insert Table

In the Insert Table windows, set the number of rows and columns you want in your table and click .
How to draw a table in InDesign: Click on Insert Table
As you see in the screenshot, you can also set the number of header rows, footer rows, and the Table Style. Header rows and footer rows are useful when you have a Table Style (more about this later - in part 3) or long tables that span over different text-frames.

This is how to draw a table in InDesign inside a frame-box. Of course, once you drew the table you can add or delete rows and columns (more on this below); you can drag and drop them to change their order; and you can assign a style to its cells.
How to draw a table in InDesign: InDesign Table created

Method 3: Import an Excel file into InDesign

You can import a spreadsheet directly from a file Excel into InDesign.

One of the advantages of using this method to create a table in InDesign is that your table comes formatted inside the InDesign document as it is in the Excel file. Then, of course, you can change its properties or assign a style in InDesign to make it more appealing.

Also, you can link the spreadsheet so that your document updates when there is a change in the Excel file (more on this later - part 2).

Follow these instructions to import an Excel file into InDesign:

Click on in the main menu bar and click on
Import an Excel file into InDesign: click on Place...

Check in the import window, select the file and click to import the Excel file into InDesign.
Import an Excel file into InDesign: Check Show Import Options

In the import, you can select many different variables, such as the Sheet to import, the Cell range, How to Format the Table, and so on. However, InDesign is smart enough to import your table correctly even if you don’t select anything and just click .
Import an Excel file into InDesign: select the file and click OK

Click and then draw a text-frame in InDesign to place your table.
Import an Excel file into InDesign: create the text-frame

This is how to import an Excel file into InDesign. Of course, once you have imported the table you can change the layout and styles of your table.
How to draw a table in InDesign: Excel into InDesign

Must-know InDesign Keyboard Shortcuts

Command OS XWindows
Insert a table in InDesignAlt + Cmd + Shift + TAlt + Ctrl + Shift + T
Place a file (image, spreadsheet, etc) into InDesignCmd + DCtrl + D

In the next post (part 2)

Let’s say that you have a product catalogue or a price list and sometimes you need to apply changes to the product prices listed in a table.

In Part 2 we will use that example to see how to import a linking spreadsheet that you can update from Excel.

Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to keep up with future posts or major updates. If you liked the post, I'd really appreciate you sharing it!

30 Tips for InDesign
Stefano Bernardi

Stefano Bernardi

Stefano has worked on numerous mid to large–sized InDesign projects for Alstom, DeLonghi, Philips, and many others before starting Redokun in 2015.
As Redokun’s Co-Founder, Stefano spends most of his time helping customers to optimize their InDesign work-flow. He also holds in-house InDesign courses for companies in the Venice, Italy area.

Sours: https://redokun.com/blog/create-or-insert-a-table-in-indesign

Tables indesign with working in

Working with Tables

Working with tables in InDesign is so much more than just making financial spreadsheets readable, although if that's what you need to accomplish InDesign is more than up to the task. Tables can be used in all sorts of creative ways beyond the obvious: crossword puzzles, reply coupons, television listings, calendars, and forms of all kinds. Just because you use a table to design all or part of your document doesn't mean that document has to look like a table. In fact, tables are useful when you have content that needs to be updated yet remain in the same location on the page. The rows, columns, and cells that make up the structure of your table can be visible as such, or they can merely serve as an underlying grid to your design. Tables used to be a thorn in the side of the graphic designer, but InDesign offers such powerful and intuitive table formatting features that this is no longer the case.

Tables are always contained in a text frame and move with the flow of the text. To align the table within the text frame, insert the Type tool to the right or left of the table and click the appropriate alignment option on the Paragraph formats section of the Control Palette.

A table is edited with the Type tool. Formatting text within a table is the same as formatting text in a text frame. Paragraph and Character Styles, as well as local formatting, can be applied to the text.

Figure 12.8. Anatomy of a Table.


Working with tables, you can add or delete rows and columns, cut or copy and paste selected cells, change the column and row height, split or merge cells, add header and footer rows, and much more.

When you create a table, it fills the width of your column. The default height of a row is determined by the leading of your text at the insertion point, but this can be easily changed.

Figure 12.9. The Table palette (Window > Type & Tables > Table).

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Figure 12.10. The Control palette Table Formats. Just as with character and paragraph formatting, there is much overlap of formatting options between the Control palette and the Table palette.

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Sours: http://etutorials.org/Adobe/Adobe+Indesign+CS2+Professional+Typography/Part+II+Paragraph+Formats/Chapter+12.+Mastering+Tabs+and+Tables/Working+with+Tables/
InDesign 2021 Tutorial - Creating and Formatting Tables and Creating Interactive Forms

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