At that meaning

At that meaning DEFAULT

at that

at that

1. Additionally; as well; on top of that. Used at the end of a sentence to emphasize the remark. The movie was boring, and it was over three hours long at that.Don't be so hard on yourself; you are intelligent, funny, and kind at that!

2. Irrespective of what has just been said, implied, or assumed; nonetheless; notwithstanding. Used at the end of a sentence to emphasize the remark. The defending champion is widely expected to remain undefeated; however, this new challenger might be able to pull out a victory at that.He has a bad reputation, but he's actually very kind at that.

See also: that

Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

at that

1. In addition, besides, as in The seats were good, and quite cheap at that. [First half of 1800s]

2. In spite of, nevertheless, as in Although I had to wait a long time for delivery, it was worth it at that. [Mid-1800s]

3. As it stands, without further changes, as in She wasn't happy with her grade in the course but decided to leave it at that. [Late 1800s]

See also: that

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

at that

in addition; furthermore (used for emphasis at the end of a statement).

1994Sunday Times The sensitivity to social change may play its part, but in reality fashion is a business, and a hard-nosed one at that.

See also: that

Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at ˈthat


1 when that happened: He said she was a fool. At that, she walked out of the room.
2 (informal) as well; either: She suggested that we should write to our Member of Parliament, and it’s not such a bad idea at that.

See also: that

Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at that

1. In addition; besides: lived in one room, and a small room at that.

2. Regardless of what has been said or implied: a long shot, but she just might win at that.

See also: that

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

See also:
Sours: //idioms.thefreedictionary.com/
\ ˈ(h)wätHow to pronounce what (audio), ˈ(h)wətHow to pronounce what (audio)\

Essential Meaning of what

1—used to ask for information about someone or somethingWhat is your name?What are those things on the table?What's your family like?What happened?What [=how much] does it cost?"What did she say?" "She said yes."What do you think of my idea?What do you want to do tonight?"Dad!" "What (do you want)?" "You have a phone call."What (on earth) are you doing?!I finished dusting. Now what (should I do)?What (should I do) next?What else did he say?You have money, fame, and a beautiful family. What more could you want?
2—used to describe a questionPlease ask them what they want for dinner.They asked her what she knew about him.I wonder what his motives were.
3—used to ask someone to say something again because you have not clearly heard or understood itWhat did you say? = (informal) What?—often used to show surprise about the thing that someone has just said"And then I said that he could go to hell." "You said what?!"She did what?!What? I don't believe it. You must be joking!

Full Definition of what

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a(1)—used as an interrogative expressing inquiry about the identity, nature, or value of an object or matterWhat is this?What is wealth without friends?What does he earn?What hath God wrought?
(2)—often used to ask for repetition of an utterance or part of an utterance not properly heard or understoodYou said what?
b(1)—used as an interrogative expressing inquiry about the character, nature, occupation, position, or role of a personWhat do you think I am, a fool?What is she, that all our swains commend her?— William Shakespeare
(2)archaic : whosense 1—used as an interrogative expressing inquiry about the identity of a person
c—used as an exclamation expressing surprise or excitement and frequently introducing a questionWhat, no breakfast?
d—used in expressions directing attention to a statement that the speaker is about to makeyou know what
e(1)—used at the end of a question to express inquiry about additional possibilitiesIs it raining, or snowing, or what?
(2)—used with or at the end of a question usually in expectation of agreementIs this exciting, or what?
fchiefly British —used at the end of an utterance as a form of tag questionA clever play, what?
2a: the thing or things thatWhat you need is a vacation.What angered us was the tone of the article.
b: that which : the one or ones thatno income but what he gets from his writings—sometimes used in reference to a clause or phrase that is yet to come or is not yet completegave also, what is more valuable, understanding
what for
1: for what purpose or reason : why—usually used with the other words of a question between what and forWhat did you do that for? except when used alone
2: harsh treatment especially by blows or by a sharp reprimand… gave him what for in violent Spanish … — New Yorker
what have you
: whatnotnovels, plays, short stories, travelogues, and what have you— Haldeen Braddy
what if
1: what will or would be the result if
2: what does it matter ifSo what if he doesn't like it.
what of
1: what is the situation with respect to
2: what importance can be assigned to
what's morewhat's what
: the true state of thingsknows what's what when it comes to fashion
what though
: what does it matter ifWhat though the rose have prickles, yet 'tis plucked …— William Shakespeare

Definition of what (Entry 2 of 3)

1: in what respect : howWhat does he care?
2—used to introduce prepositional phrases in parallel construction or a prepositional phrase that expresses cause and usually has more than one object—used principally before phrases beginning with withwhat with unemployment increasing… what with the war, what with the sweat, what with the gallows, and what with poverty, I am custom-shrunk.— William Shakespeare

Definition of what (Entry 3 of 3)

1a—used as an interrogative expressing inquiry about the identity, nature, or value of a person, object, or matterWhat minerals do we export?
b: how remarkable or striking for good or bad qualities—used especially in exclamatory utterances and dependent clausesWhat mountains!Remember what fun we had?What a suggestion!What a charming girl!
2a: the … that : as much or as many … asrescued what survivors they found
Sours: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/what
  1. All world reno baseball tournament
  2. Macs list portland
  3. Cummins filtration
  4. Power wagon craigslist
  5. Register silhouette cameo 4

1

In addition, besides, as in The seats were good, and quite cheap at that. [First half of 1800s]

2

In spite of, nevertheless, as in Although I had to wait a long time for delivery, it was worth it at that. [Mid-1800s]

3

As it stands, without further changes, as in She wasn't happy with her grade in the course but decided to leave it at that. [Late 1800s]

QUIZ

ARE YOU A TRUE BLUE CHAMPION OF THESE "BLUE" SYNONYMS?

We could talk until we're blue in the face about this quiz on words for the color "blue," but we think you should take the quiz and find out if you're a whiz at these colorful terms.

Question 1 of 8

Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?

Words nearby at that

attest, attestation, attested, attested form, att. gen., at that, at that point, at that rate, at that stage, at the crossroads, at the drop of a hat

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

How to use at that in a sentence

  • I spoke first with Scott Ellman, a student at Wesleyan University and now the Huffington Post editor-at-large for his campus.

    Fraternities in a Post-UVA World|Samantha Allen|December 12, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • The at-home genetics testing company 23andme, established in 2006, helps people learn more about their “DNA relatives.”

    Nothing Says I Love You Like Data|The Daily Beast|December 8, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • This at-home blood test kit gives a full reading of antioxidant, fatty acid, or vitamin panels.

    Nothing Says I Love You Like Data|The Daily Beast|December 8, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • At-home caretakers are eligible for Medicaid waivers, which allow benefits regardless of income.

    Medicaid Will Give You Money for At-Home Care, but You Might Wait Years|Elizabeth Picciuto|December 2, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • Because women with disabilities are one of the most at-risk demographics in the world.

    #YesAllWomen, but Not Really: How Feminism Leaves the Disabled Behind|Elizabeth Heideman|November 24, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • "Buy something for your wife that-is-to-be," he said to his grand-nephew, as he handed him the folded paper.

    The Pit Town Coronet, Volume I (of 3)|Charles James Wills

  • Tressan was monstrous ill-at-ease, and his face lost a good deal of its habitual plethora of colour.

    St. Martin's Summer|Rafael Sabatini

  • A fellow rudely clad—a hybrid between man-at-arms and lackey—lounged on a musket to confront them in the gateway.

    St. Martin's Summer|Rafael Sabatini

  • And whilst I was stretched out that-a-way, Mace come clost and give me her hand.

    Alec Lloyd, Cowpuncher|Eleanor Gates

  • And the Seneschal, moved by that confident promise of evil, threw himself before the men-at-arms.

    St. Martin's Summer|Rafael Sabatini

Sours: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/at--that
Grade 2 - Multiple meaning Words

at that

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishat thatat thata)AND/ALSOalso or besidesIt’s a new idea, and a good one, at that.b)AFTERafter something is saidTess called him a liar and at that he stormed out of the room. →atExamples from the Corpusat that• She's pregnant and having twins at that!• Partymanagersarrivedat thatconclusion because that is the way they had treated their own party for the past eight years.• Tess called him a liar and at that he stormed out of the room.• That would mean they've taken something like ten milesat thatpoint.• None of these four and five-year-olds could readat thatstage.• It containedat that time 23 houses.• This was not so easyat that time as the crewingarrangements were very much of a closedshop.• An intelligent computer-based agent will have determined that you will be on that flightat that time, in that seat.• Lifeguardsat that time reported that the whaleappearedlethargic and did not attempt to swimaway once freed from the kelp.• So personalgrowthat that time was in high leapsforward rather than in little trickles.at thatat thatADDused after adding a piece of information which emphasizes and increases what you have just saidYou should be able to answer the question in a single sentence, and a short one at that. →thatExamples from the Corpusat that• Party managers arrived at that conclusion because that is the way they had treated their own party for the past eight years.• That would mean they've taken something like ten miles at that point.• None of these four and five-year-olds could read at that stage.• It contained at that time 23 houses.• This was not so easy at that time as the crewing arrangements were very much of a closed shop.• An intelligent computer-based agent will have determined that you will be on that flight at that time, in that seat.• Lifeguards at that time reported that the whale appeared lethargic and did not attempt to swim away once freed from the kelp.• So personal growth at that time was in high leaps forward rather than in little trickles.

Sours: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/at-that

That meaning at

Meaning of at that in English:

at that

Translate at that into Spanish

phrase

  • In addition; furthermore.

    ‘it was not fog but smoke, and very thick at that’

    • ‘She let out such a yelp and it was no wonder, as Tom had nothing on but a shirt and it wasn't too long at that!’
    • ‘We now live in a country where citizens can be executed without trial, and by a foreign government at that.’
    • ‘We are the kind of people, he thought, who buy their own furniture and second-hand at that.’
    • ‘No, this shore is not a destination for me; it is just a refuge, and a temporary one at that.’
    • ‘Instead of thunder, the company had been struck by a need to change the cast, and no minor change at that.’
    • ‘When she fell pregnant, Sara was hoping she would be having twins - and girls at that.’
    • ‘London looks set to receive a new evening paper soon, and a free one at that.’
    • ‘All a matter of opinion, of course, and in the cases of Randall and Morris, an educated opinion at that.’
    • ‘All the time a game of football was being played, and a pretty good one at that.’
    • ‘So, the Tate is at least making an effort to display more art, and a big, expensive one at that.’
Sours: https://www.lexico.com/definition/at_that
Language \u0026 Meaning: Crash Course Philosophy #26

The first day. On the bus she snuggled up to me like a small homeless kitten that someone suddenly fed, warmed and cuddled. All the way I drove with my eyes closed.

Now discussing:

Already openly funny. - I'll go, but not today. I'm going to the toilet. We will rise in the mood. Hysterical rise.



612 613 614 615 616