Records interview questions

Records interview questions DEFAULT

In this article, we explore some of the most common interview questions asked during a records management clerk interview along with some great answers to help you win the job.

Are you sitting comfortably? Let’s begin!

1. What should be the qualities of records management clerk?

In order to score well in this interview question, an efficient way is to give a list of qualities and skills that are in alignment with the respective position. You can start with:

  • First, one must understand the methods required to succeed in this position
  • Secondly, indicate that the job will be your #1 priority
  • Third, indicate that you understand the importance of working as a team

Remember that regardless of position, self awareness is listed time and again as one of the number one things an employer looks for. Beyond this, staples such as:

  • Good communication
  • Confidence
  • Trustworthiness
  • Passion
  • Preparedness

Are always great qualities to mention.

2. What experience do you have when it comes to discussing our recently posted RECORDS MANAGEMENT CLERK position?

Answer tips:

Speak about specifics that relate to the position you are applying for. If you know you do not have much experience in the job you are applying for, plan for this question ahead of time and ensure you can provide some relatable examples based on what you have done.

Almost all interviewers will appreciate confidence and pride in the work experience you have earned and your passion in transfering these valuable skills to your future role or position.

Answer sample

Ever since my first paper route at age 10 I’ve been doing something to keep myself busy and earn money. Back then, it was obviously about earning some spending money. What I didn’t realize was that I was actually starting the journey of establishing what I liked to do and how I fit in to the grand scheme of things. I then worked as a junior computer tech in my last 2 summers of high school. It was here that I discovered what I was passionate about and what I wanted to do. I enrolled in college to get my degree in computer sciences, and I have been working around technology ever since.

3. Our field is always changing. As such, what have you done with regards to personal development when it comes to our posted RECORDS MANAGEMENT CLERK POSITION in the last 12 months?

Answer tips:

Here is an opportunity for you to showcase a wide variety of things you may have done both personally and professionally that will get your potential employers interested. Be sure to think about this one in advance in the event that it comes up.

Keep in mind, one of the key things that employers look for is an applicant who is self motivated and goal oriented.

Even if you don’t have something that is specific to the role you are applying for, don’t be afraid to list hobbies or other non-work related activities here. Again, this shows your employer you are the go-getter they are looking for.

In the end, you want to ensure that you are leaving your interviewer with the impression that you are motivated, self sufficient, and manage your time effectively.

Answer samples

That is a really great question. While I haven’t had the opportunity to develop within this particular role per se, I have actually become very involved in my local foodbank this year. This has taught me a great deal about community, teamwork, and taking initiative.
I took it upon myself to enroll in a summer business admin course at the local community college. Through this, I picked up some really great knowledge on communication and teamwork, as well as further develop overall managerial skills. Though it may not be directly applicable to this particular job, I believe the overall experience I gained could be a real asset here.

4. Tell me about yourself

In polling hundreds of different companies & HR departments, this is by far one of the most frequently asked questions in any job interview. Your interviewer will use this as an icebreaker, ideally to put you at ease and get you speaking openly and honestly.

While you definitely want to be prepared for this question, you certainly don’t want to make your answer sound memorized. Keep in mind, while this question may sound like an invitation to share your life story, you can be assured your interviewer has very little interest in hearing about everything you’ve ever done.

The person giving the interview has a job to do as well – respect their time. Unless you are asked about something specific, focus on your education, your work history, relatable hobbies and outside interests, as well as your current situation.

Be sure to start chronologically and tell a linear story. Start where you feel is sensical, then work your way up to the present.

5. I like what I’m hearing but we’ve got a ton of great candidates. Why should we hire you?

An easy question to answer well with one caveat – don’t slam your fellow interviewee’s. On the one hand, you have an opportunity to really stand out from the pack. Alternatively, You shouldn’t assume the skills of other applicants. Focus on your own strengths, and if the interviewer hasn’t given you an opportunity to mention that one “slam dunk” quality about yourself, now would be the time.

Is there a wrong way to answer this question? Consider the responses below:

  • “I really need a job right now”
  • “I need the money”
  • “Your office is really close to my house”
  • “I’ve always been interested in what you guys do”

Notice any commonality here? All of these answers demonstrate a benefit to you. While every employer assumes that these sorts of things play in on some level, these are not the reasons they are going to hire you.

In summation, clearly illustrate what in specific has made you a good employee, and how you envision yourself contributing to and benefiting the company.

6. I’m curious – how did you come to find out about our company and what do you know about us?

This can be a great way to stand out from other applicants and demonstrate initiative. Almost every company will have a website, Facebook page, Instagram account, or some sort of digital footprint. Spend a bit of time doing some online research:

  • If they have a website, check out their “About us” or “Culture/Mission/Vision” pages.
  • Who are some of the principal people who work there? Who are the founders?
  • What sorts of things does this company care about? Do they donate to a particular cause or charity? Which one(s)?
  • What are their core values? Which of their core values resonate with you?
  • Has the company been in the news recently or have they won any awards (Social Media can be a great place to find this information).

While your interviewer won’t expect you to have in-depth company history, a little here can go a long way.

7. I don’t expect you to go into too much detail – but why are you leaving your last job?

An innocent question. But a question that if answered improperly, can be a deal breaker. While many individuals will be looking to a new job as a means of increasing their salary, “not being paid well enough at your last job” is not something you want to mention to your interviewer. After all, are you not likely to leave this particular job if you found you could make more down the street?

If you’re currently employed and leaving of your own accord, craft your response around enhancing your career development and a seeking out of new challenges.

If your current employer is downsizing, be honest about it, remain positive, but keep it brief. If your employer fired you or let you go for cause, be prepared to give a brief – but honest – reply. No matter how tempting it may be, or how “unfair it was that they let you go” steer clear away from any and all drama and negativity. Any experienced employer understands that sometimes things happen. Staying positive is key here.

8. What are your strengths?

While this question is an invitation to do some chest pounding, remember to illustrate strengths that will benefit the employer and arerelative to the position. For example:

  • being a problem solver
  • being a motivator
  • being a natural leader
  • the ability to perform under pressure
  • a positive attitude
  • loyalty

Are typically all solid strengths, but again, consider the position. For example, mentioning you are an excellent “team player” in a job where you largely work alone suddenly becomes irrelevant to the employer and demonstrates a genuine lack of self awareness.

Beyond this, present your strengths with confidence – this is not the time to be modest.

9. What are your weaknesses?

Another tricky one. The purpose of this question is to see how you view and evaluate yourself.

One the one hand, if you suggest you don’t have any weaknesses, your interviewer will almost certainly see you as a lair, egotistical, or both.

Don’t fall into the trap of trying to present a positive skill in disguise as a weakness, like “I work too hard” or “I am a perfectionist”. Any experienced interviewer will see through this in a heartbeat.

Additionally, revealing that “I’m not really a morning person and have been known to come in late” raises immediate and obvious red flags.

The trick here is to respond realistically by mentioning a small, work related weakness and what you are doing or have done to overcome it.

10. What do you see yourself doing in five years?

This one is all about job commitment.

Some people make job hopping a career in of itself, and your answer here can be telling. Here, your interviewer is determining if you are:

  • someone who sets goals
  • someone who has a vision
  • someone who is reliable
  • someone who demonstrates commitment
  • someone who is loyal

While no interviewer expects someone to stay at a company forever, try and craft your response in such a way that shows progression in your career, and alignment with the Company’s needs and future. Again, self awareness is key – your employer doesn’t want to send you down an unwanted path, resulting in wasted time and energy for everyone.

11. What are your salary expectations?

Many consider this question to be a loaded gun – dangerous in the hands of the inexperienced. Often times, an interviewee will start talking salary before they’ve had an opportunity to illustrate their skill set and value making any sort of leverage valueless. Here, knowledge is power, as salary often comes down to negotiation. Do some research into your industry to establish base rates of pay based on seniority and demand but keep in mind – your employer is hiring you for what they believe you are worth, and how much benefit they feel you will provide.

One relatively safe approach is simply asking the interviewer about the salary range. If you wish to avoid the question entirely, respond by saying that “money isn’t a key factor” and your primary goal is to advance in your career.

12. Do you have any questions?

This one you can almost be assured will be asked, and you better have some ready.

By asking questions you demonstrate initiative, and show that you care enough about the job to have done some research. Ask questions that focus on areas where you can be an asset. Beyond this, other questions may be more direct including productivity, expectations, training, and other logistics. All this being said, try and limit the questions to no more than three or four.

Lastly you’ll want to ask about the next step in the process and when to expect to hear about the position.

Top job interview materials:

For more details, please click links below:

1. Top 10 job interview books

2. 10 things to do after every job interview

8 bonus tips for knocking it out of the park:

1. Background Research

As indicated above, research on the company you’re applying for is critically important. Arm yourself with knowledge on the products, services, and types of customers this company deals with. You may even want to let them know who you feel their competition is! Beyond trying to make yourself look good, researching the culture of the company can provide great insights into whether or not you and your potential employer are aligned.

2. Practice makes perfect

To be certain, interviews do not always follow the same format and each interviewer will have his or her own style. That said, there are certain questions you can expect to be asked in almost any interview for any position. By understanding and practicing responses for these “oldies but goodies”, you can show up to each interview that much more confident.

3. Have some examples ready

While many candidates tell their interviewer that they posses certain desirable qualities, the proof as they say, is in the pudding. Spend some time in advance of your interview coming up with concrete examples of prior work achievements and how they demonstrate a desired ability. Be prepared for the recruiter’s questions and to anticipate them based on job position requirements. Instead of simply saying “I am well organized”, trying attaching an example or strategy. “I am a well organized person - here is an example of a project I spear-headed where organization was clutch”. Looking for the slam dunk? Finish your response with “Did that help answer your question?”.

4. Dressing for Success

First impressions can make or break so many things in society, and your interviewer’s impression of you is no exception. Whether anyone is willing to admit to it or not, the reality is you will be judged from the moment you arrive at the door. This is where some of the aforementioned research comes into play. What is the culture of the company like? Are they a highly formal suit-and-tie affair, or a casual silicon valley “hipster” organization? If you under-dress, you can appear to be too relaxed, and someone who does not appear to be taking this position seriously. However, overdressing can be perceived as over compensation. When in doubt, dress sharp, in classic business casual.

5. Play it cool

Assuming you have done some practice, you are ready to play it cool - as well you should. Make sure you’ve planned out your route well in advance, and provided ample extra time for unexpected traffic and parking issues. You should smile when greeted, and keep in mind that your interviewer may be just as nervous as you. During the interview, speak clearly and deliberately. Your body language is also important; don’t slouch back in your chair or appear “hunched over” in a defensive position. Sit tall, proud, and confident.

6. Be honest

Some candidates think using elaborate techniques to “talk around” difficult questions keeps them in the power position. A much better approach is honesty. If you are asked a question and simply don’t believe you have well developed skills in that area, don’t be afraid to let the interviewer know, rather than answering with unrelated and tangential examples. Try taking control in these situations by saying something like “While I don’t have experience in that particular area, I feel my experience in this area may be beneficial”.

7. Don’t be afraid to close the deal

Once the interview is over, the likelihood is both you and the interviewer have a good idea of where one another stand. As you stand up post interview and engage in a final handshake, be upfront. Confidence here can go a long way. If you believe you nailed the interview, be bold: “I’m going to be straight with you - I think that went really well and I think I’d be a great asset here. Where do I stand as of now?”. Alternatively, if you don’t think it went well…you probably have your answer already.

8. Be sure to ask questions

Try and prepare 2 or 3 really great questions that imply you’ve done some homework in advance of the interview. You can really impress your interviewer by asking practical questions regarding specifics about the company as well as the role itself.

Sours: https://interviewquestions247.com/2013/11/records-management-clerk-interview-questions-answers.html

In this article, we explore some of the most common interview questions asked during a records manager interview along with some great answers to help you win the job.

Are you sitting comfortably? Let’s begin!

1. As a records manager, what is your management style?

Answer tips:

Try to avoid labels.

Some of the more common labels, like progressive, consultative, persuasive, can have several meanings or descriptions depending on which management guru you listen to.

The situational style is safe, because it says you will manage according to the situation, instead of one size fits all.

Answer samples

In my experience delegating responsibility and authority is crucial. A team needs to be able to develop and grow as individuals and a whole, not be held back by low expectations or ego.
I believe in building a team. Each member of the team should be clear on their role, know where they fit in and feel as though they can depend on one another. I also believe in real-time feedback. If you do something wrong you should know it immediately. Regardless of right or wrong, the further removed feedback is in time, the less effective it is.

2. What experience do you have with respects to this particular RECORDS MANAGER position?

Answer tips:

Speak about specifics that relate to the position you are applying for. If you know you do not have much experience in the job you are applying for, plan for this question ahead of time and ensure you can provide some relatable examples based on what you have done.

Almost all interviewers will appreciate confidence and pride in the work experience you have earned and your passion in transfering these valuable skills to your future role or position.

Answer sample

Ever since my first paper route at age 10 I’ve been doing something to keep myself busy and earn money. Back then, it was obviously about earning some spending money. What I didn’t realize was that I was actually starting the journey of establishing what I liked to do and how I fit in to the grand scheme of things. I then worked as a junior computer tech in my last 2 summers of high school. It was here that I discovered what I was passionate about and what I wanted to do. I enrolled in college to get my degree in computer sciences, and I have been working around technology ever since.

3. Our field is always changing. As such, what have you done with regards to personal development when it comes to our posted RECORDS MANAGER POSITION in the last 12 months?

Answer tips:

Here is an opportunity for you to showcase a wide variety of things you may have done both personally and professionally that will get your potential employers interested. Be sure to think about this one in advance in the event that it comes up.

Keep in mind, one of the key things that employers look for is an applicant who is self motivated and goal oriented.

Even if you don’t have something that is specific to the role you are applying for, don’t be afraid to list hobbies or other non-work related activities here. Again, this shows your employer you are the go-getter they are looking for.

In the end, you want to ensure that you are leaving your interviewer with the impression that you are motivated, self sufficient, and manage your time effectively.

Answer samples

That is a really great question. While I haven’t had the opportunity to develop within this particular role per se, I have actually become very involved in my local foodbank this year. This has taught me a great deal about community, teamwork, and taking initiative.
I took it upon myself to enroll in a summer business admin course at the local community college. Through this, I picked up some really great knowledge on communication and teamwork, as well as further develop overall managerial skills. Though it may not be directly applicable to this particular job, I believe the overall experience I gained could be a real asset here.

4. Tell me about yourself

In polling hundreds of different companies & HR departments, this is by far one of the most frequently asked questions in any job interview. Your interviewer will use this as an icebreaker, ideally to put you at ease and get you speaking openly and honestly.

While you definitely want to be prepared for this question, you certainly don’t want to make your answer sound memorized. Keep in mind, while this question may sound like an invitation to share your life story, you can be assured your interviewer has very little interest in hearing about everything you’ve ever done.

The person giving the interview has a job to do as well – respect their time. Unless you are asked about something specific, focus on your education, your work history, relatable hobbies and outside interests, as well as your current situation.

Be sure to start chronologically and tell a linear story. Start where you feel is sensical, then work your way up to the present.

5. I like what I’m hearing but we’ve got a ton of great candidates. Why should we hire you?

An easy question to answer well with one caveat – don’t slam your fellow interviewee’s. On the one hand, you have an opportunity to really stand out from the pack. Alternatively, You shouldn’t assume the skills of other applicants. Focus on your own strengths, and if the interviewer hasn’t given you an opportunity to mention that one “slam dunk” quality about yourself, now would be the time.

Is there a wrong way to answer this question? Consider the responses below:

  • “I really need a job right now”
  • “I need the money”
  • “Your office is really close to my house”
  • “I’ve always been interested in what you guys do”

Notice any commonality here? All of these answers demonstrate a benefit to you. While every employer assumes that these sorts of things play in on some level, these are not the reasons they are going to hire you.

In summation, clearly illustrate what in specific has made you a good employee, and how you envision yourself contributing to and benefiting the company.

6. I’m curious – how did you come to find out about our company and what do you know about us?

This can be a great way to stand out from other applicants and demonstrate initiative. Almost every company will have a website, Facebook page, Instagram account, or some sort of digital footprint. Spend a bit of time doing some online research:

  • If they have a website, check out their “About us” or “Culture/Mission/Vision” pages.
  • Who are some of the principal people who work there? Who are the founders?
  • What sorts of things does this company care about? Do they donate to a particular cause or charity? Which one(s)?
  • What are their core values? Which of their core values resonate with you?
  • Has the company been in the news recently or have they won any awards (Social Media can be a great place to find this information).

While your interviewer won’t expect you to have in-depth company history, a little here can go a long way.

7. I don’t expect you to go into too much detail – but why are you leaving your last job?

An innocent question. But a question that if answered improperly, can be a deal breaker. While many individuals will be looking to a new job as a means of increasing their salary, “not being paid well enough at your last job” is not something you want to mention to your interviewer. After all, are you not likely to leave this particular job if you found you could make more down the street?

If you’re currently employed and leaving of your own accord, craft your response around enhancing your career development and a seeking out of new challenges.

If your current employer is downsizing, be honest about it, remain positive, but keep it brief. If your employer fired you or let you go for cause, be prepared to give a brief – but honest – reply. No matter how tempting it may be, or how “unfair it was that they let you go” steer clear away from any and all drama and negativity. Any experienced employer understands that sometimes things happen. Staying positive is key here.

8. What are your strengths?

While this question is an invitation to do some chest pounding, remember to illustrate strengths that will benefit the employer and arerelative to the position. For example:

  • being a problem solver
  • being a motivator
  • being a natural leader
  • the ability to perform under pressure
  • a positive attitude
  • loyalty

Are typically all solid strengths, but again, consider the position. For example, mentioning you are an excellent “team player” in a job where you largely work alone suddenly becomes irrelevant to the employer and demonstrates a genuine lack of self awareness.

Beyond this, present your strengths with confidence – this is not the time to be modest.

9. What are your weaknesses?

Another tricky one. The purpose of this question is to see how you view and evaluate yourself.

One the one hand, if you suggest you don’t have any weaknesses, your interviewer will almost certainly see you as a lair, egotistical, or both.

Don’t fall into the trap of trying to present a positive skill in disguise as a weakness, like “I work too hard” or “I am a perfectionist”. Any experienced interviewer will see through this in a heartbeat.

Additionally, revealing that “I’m not really a morning person and have been known to come in late” raises immediate and obvious red flags.

The trick here is to respond realistically by mentioning a small, work related weakness and what you are doing or have done to overcome it.

10. What do you see yourself doing in five years?

This one is all about job commitment.

Some people make job hopping a career in of itself, and your answer here can be telling. Here, your interviewer is determining if you are:

  • someone who sets goals
  • someone who has a vision
  • someone who is reliable
  • someone who demonstrates commitment
  • someone who is loyal

While no interviewer expects someone to stay at a company forever, try and craft your response in such a way that shows progression in your career, and alignment with the Company’s needs and future. Again, self awareness is key – your employer doesn’t want to send you down an unwanted path, resulting in wasted time and energy for everyone.

11. What are your salary expectations?

Many consider this question to be a loaded gun – dangerous in the hands of the inexperienced. Often times, an interviewee will start talking salary before they’ve had an opportunity to illustrate their skill set and value making any sort of leverage valueless. Here, knowledge is power, as salary often comes down to negotiation. Do some research into your industry to establish base rates of pay based on seniority and demand but keep in mind – your employer is hiring you for what they believe you are worth, and how much benefit they feel you will provide.

One relatively safe approach is simply asking the interviewer about the salary range. If you wish to avoid the question entirely, respond by saying that “money isn’t a key factor” and your primary goal is to advance in your career.

12. Do you have any questions?

This one you can almost be assured will be asked, and you better have some ready.

By asking questions you demonstrate initiative, and show that you care enough about the job to have done some research. Ask questions that focus on areas where you can be an asset. Beyond this, other questions may be more direct including productivity, expectations, training, and other logistics. All this being said, try and limit the questions to no more than three or four.

Lastly you’ll want to ask about the next step in the process and when to expect to hear about the position.

Top job interview materials:

For more details, please click links below:

1. Top 10 job interview books

2. 10 things to do after every job interview

8 bonus tips for knocking it out of the park:

1. Background Research

As indicated above, research on the company you’re applying for is critically important. Arm yourself with knowledge on the products, services, and types of customers this company deals with. You may even want to let them know who you feel their competition is! Beyond trying to make yourself look good, researching the culture of the company can provide great insights into whether or not you and your potential employer are aligned.

2. Practice makes perfect

To be certain, interviews do not always follow the same format and each interviewer will have his or her own style. That said, there are certain questions you can expect to be asked in almost any interview for any position. By understanding and practicing responses for these “oldies but goodies”, you can show up to each interview that much more confident.

3. Have some examples ready

While many candidates tell their interviewer that they posses certain desirable qualities, the proof as they say, is in the pudding. Spend some time in advance of your interview coming up with concrete examples of prior work achievements and how they demonstrate a desired ability. Be prepared for the recruiter’s questions and to anticipate them based on job position requirements. Instead of simply saying “I am well organized”, trying attaching an example or strategy. “I am a well organized person - here is an example of a project I spear-headed where organization was clutch”. Looking for the slam dunk? Finish your response with “Did that help answer your question?”.

4. Dressing for Success

First impressions can make or break so many things in society, and your interviewer’s impression of you is no exception. Whether anyone is willing to admit to it or not, the reality is you will be judged from the moment you arrive at the door. This is where some of the aforementioned research comes into play. What is the culture of the company like? Are they a highly formal suit-and-tie affair, or a casual silicon valley “hipster” organization? If you under-dress, you can appear to be too relaxed, and someone who does not appear to be taking this position seriously. However, overdressing can be perceived as over compensation. When in doubt, dress sharp, in classic business casual.

5. Play it cool

Assuming you have done some practice, you are ready to play it cool - as well you should. Make sure you’ve planned out your route well in advance, and provided ample extra time for unexpected traffic and parking issues. You should smile when greeted, and keep in mind that your interviewer may be just as nervous as you. During the interview, speak clearly and deliberately. Your body language is also important; don’t slouch back in your chair or appear “hunched over” in a defensive position. Sit tall, proud, and confident.

6. Be honest

Some candidates think using elaborate techniques to “talk around” difficult questions keeps them in the power position. A much better approach is honesty. If you are asked a question and simply don’t believe you have well developed skills in that area, don’t be afraid to let the interviewer know, rather than answering with unrelated and tangential examples. Try taking control in these situations by saying something like “While I don’t have experience in that particular area, I feel my experience in this area may be beneficial”.

7. Don’t be afraid to close the deal

Once the interview is over, the likelihood is both you and the interviewer have a good idea of where one another stand. As you stand up post interview and engage in a final handshake, be upfront. Confidence here can go a long way. If you believe you nailed the interview, be bold: “I’m going to be straight with you - I think that went really well and I think I’d be a great asset here. Where do I stand as of now?”. Alternatively, if you don’t think it went well…you probably have your answer already.

8. Be sure to ask questions

Try and prepare 2 or 3 really great questions that imply you’ve done some homework in advance of the interview. You can really impress your interviewer by asking practical questions regarding specifics about the company as well as the role itself.

Sours: https://interviewquestions247.com/2013/11/records-manager-interview-questions-answers.html
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40 Common Interview Questions for Medical Records Clerks

Working as a medical records clerk can be a highly fulfilling career in the healthcare field full of opportunities to assist patients. Clerks perform the vital role of maintaining patient documentation by collecting information, filing records, assisting in audits and managing access to files. If you're a prospective medical records clerk preparing for an interview, there are a few common questions you should prepare to answer. In this article, we outline the most common medical records clerk interview questions with sample answers, in addition to general interview questions, questions about experience and other in-depth questions you may be asked.

Related:Medical Records Clerk

Most common medical records clerk interview questions

Below are some of the most common questions interviewers ask prospective medical records clerks, as well as advice on how to answer them with examples. While you sort through these examples, it may be helpful to practice how you might approach answering such questions in regards to your particular experiences and professional background. When drafting your answers, it's important to remember that interviews are interested in thorough answers expressed in clear, concise and engaging manner.

1. What experience do you have with maintaining accurate health records?

When interviewers ask this question, you should express that you understand the importance of data accuracy when keeping medical records. Maintaining accuracy is a significant part of working as a medical records clerk and therefore, you should remember to discuss your methods of managing data correctly and consistently. It may also be helpful to discuss the experiences you've had in the past maintaining data accuracy.

Example: "In my past role maintaining data, I was responsible for double-checking my work and maintaining an up-to-date knowledge of what was stored in the data management system I utilized. To check my work, I would compare the external data to valid sources, proofing for the accuracy of data itself, and then I would compare the data to internal data as a final step. I believe the process of maintaining accurate health records is a truly important factor of working as a medical records clerk."

Related:6 Ways to Improve Your Data Entry Skills

2. Have you ever performed an audit of a medical records department? What were your duties?

As a medical records clerk, you will likely be responsible for helping to audit medical records periodically. Auditing records is a process of assessing the accuracy of them. Therefore, you'll need to be prepared to draft and send reports of stored data to the officers involved with auditing processes. When interviewers ask you about your experience with audits, try to outline your experience with such procedures and how you prepared for audits in the past. This can help the interviewer better understand how you would perform specific tasks within their organization.

Example: "*I have been a part of many audit requests before in my five years of experience as a medical records clerk. I was responsible for creating reports on all of the medical tests, such as biopsies, blood tests and CAT scans that our hospital performed during the calendar year. I worked alongside the officers involved in the auditing process to ensure that they had all of the information they needed to perform the audit properly and assess the accuracy of the records as they were kept."*

3. What health information software programs have you worked with in previous roles?

Medical records clerks must use health information management software programs, or electronic medical record (EMR) systems to accomplish their day-to-day responsibilities. There are many different systems available for use in medical records keeping. An interview may ask you this question to gain a better understanding of what specific technical skills you possess and how much training you would need if you were selected for the position. If you've worked with many systems in the past, you might be able to learn the features of a new system quickly. You should outline your experience with specific systems and explain what features you used most commonly when working with those systems.

Example: "*I have worked with multiple health information software programs, including those with intuitive data checks, patient scheduling tools, meaningful use reporting and other features. Since I'm an intuitive learner with experience working with a diverse array of these systems, I'm confident that I can become well-versed in the system that your facility uses to maintain their health records."*

4. If a patient requests the release of their medical records, what process would you go through?

As a medical records clerk, it's common that a patient will request the release of their medical records so that they may receive comprehensive care at other facilities. There are specific processes that you will have to perform in order to assist a patient with such a request. If an interviewer asks you this question, it's likely that they're trying to gain a better understanding of your knowledge of such processes. You should try to explain your past experience with medical records release procedures. Providing evidence that you've worked with releasing patient records under various circumstances can also be beneficial when answering this question.

Example: "*In my past roles as a medical records clerk, I've gained plenty of experience helping patients with records releases. Depending on the type of EMR system you use in your facility, patients may be able to gain access to their medical records online or in person. From here, it's likely that patients will have to fill out an official form to release their medical records in which they provide specific identifying information to verify their request. In addition, in some cases, patients must pay for the cost of their records. Processing these requests and fees would be my duty as a medical records clerk."*

5. As a medical records clerk, you'll be working directly with patients. What do you think are the most important tenets of professionalism to follow when interfacing with patients?

Professionalism is an essential trait of a successful medical records clerk. This is especially true in cases where medical records clerks work with patients—factors like maintaining a calm disposition and helpful attitude can make a significant difference when interfacing with patients. If an interviewer asks you this question, it's likely that they're trying to find out more about how you would perform professionalism in your role if selected. You should describe the qualities that you think define professionalism and how those qualities relate to patient care. Answering this question thoroughly can show that you take the duty of interacting with patients seriously.

Example: "*I think professionalism is one of the key qualities a successful medical records clerk should possess. When working with patients, I believe that it's important to treat them respectfully—how I would like to be treated when I seek medical care and assistance. With all patients, I try to listen carefully and actively to what they say. This can help patients feel heard, which I believe is a vital part of interfacing with them. From here, I try my absolute best to provide them with assistance within the guidelines of the facilities I worked at."*

Related:21 Medical School Jobs You Can Do Without Attending Medical School

General medical clerk interview questions

Here are a few general questions you may encounter in an interview for a medical clerk position. These questions help interviewers better understand who you are, what your personality is like and why you're interested in the position:

  • Why do you want to work here?
  • What are your professional goals?
  • What is your greatest strength?
  • Why did you leave your last job?
  • What are your three best qualities?
  • Where do you see yourself in five years?
  • How did you learn about the job opening?
  • Why do you want this job?
  • What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?
  • What's your dream job?

Related:21 Job Interview Tips: How To Make a Great Impression

Questions about experience and medical background

Here are a few questions that can help interviewers evaluate your professional experience and background in the healthcare field. These questions are designed to evaluate whether your skills and competencies match the needs of the role of medical clerk:

  • Do you have experience in the healthcare field?
  • What is your educational background?
  • Have you ever worked in a similar role before?
  • Why are you interested in working in the healthcare field?
  • Tell us about a time you experienced a challenge at work—what happened?
  • What are your strongest skills related to healthcare?
  • Can you describe an experience that demonstrates your leadership style?
  • What has been your most rewarding job?
  • Do you have experience working with data systems?
  • What is your knowledge of personal health data security?
  • What electronic software are you familiar with?
  • What are your passions and do they relate to the healthcare field?

Related:Everything You Need To Know About Job Interview Etiquette

In-depth questions for medical records clerk

Here are some more in-depth questions you may experience in an interview as a prospective medical clerk. These questions help an interviewer understand your specific knowledge of medical record keeping, what data management systems you're familiar with and how you would approach problem-solving opportunities in your career:

  • What do you think is the most important part of working as a medical records clerk?
  • What is your knowledge of patient medical record confidentiality terms?
  • Do you know what an EMR system is? If so, can you explain it?
  • Can you describe a time when you worked with a particularly challenging patient? How did you resolve the situation?
  • Patient support will be part of your role as a medical record clerk. What experience do you have in that realm?
  • How do you plan to minimize errors like misfiling information and data inaccuracies as a records clerk?
  • Do you have experience digitizing physical records?
  • What would you do if you received constructive feedback about errors in your records?
  • What experience have you had collaborating with healthcare professionals?
  • How would you optimize the speed of the medical records collection process?
  • What EMR systems do you prefer to work with?
  • Can you explain what a data retrieval is and in what situations you would perform one?
  • What is your process for handling duplicate patient information?

Jobs similar to a medical records clerk

If you're interested in becoming a medical records clerk or a similar profession, here's a list of 10 jobs to consider:

1. Health information technician

2. Pharmacy technician

3. Administrative assistant

4. Medical transcriptionist

5. Inpatient coder

6. Database specialist

7. Mental health technician

8. Medical assistant

9. Billing coordinator

10. Medical secretary

Sours: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/interviewing/medical-record-clerk-interview-questions
Records Clerk Interview Questions

Records Management Interview Questions & Answers

  • Question 1. What Is A Record?

    Answer :

    Records are the outputs that detail each and every business and administrative transaction of the University and contain information about our students, members of staff and all our external contacts. They are the essential resource for the University's effective continuation. They also form the University's collective memory that must be available beyond the memory or working life of any single member of staff.

    A document in itself is a type of record, but so is the information that describes the document when it forms a separate entity. For example, an entry in a library catalogue (whether on card or in a computer database) which records the author, title and location of the book, is as much a record as the book itself.

  • Question 2. What Is Records Management?

    Answer :

    • Records management is a process for the systematic management of all records and the information or data that they contain. Traditionally these were held on paper, or more recently on microfilm or fiche, but are now held increasingly within electronic systems.
    • The core concept is the life cycle of information, which sees information having a series of phases from creation to final disposition either through a controlled destruction process or being added to the long-term or permanent record (the archive) of the University.
    • Records Management incorporates the practice of identifying, classifying, providing access to, archiving, and sometimes the controlled destruction of records.
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  • Question 3. Why Is Records Management Important?

    Answer :

    Without institution-wide records management procedures, each College, School, Department or Unit of the University would continue to follow their own practices. Whilst each set of practices may seem to be based upon a common sense approach, an uncoordinated approach to managing the University's records could lead to:

    • Failure to comply with legislation
    • Risks to institutional accountability
    • Inefficient use of staff time
    • Poorly informed decision-making
    • Loss of institutional memory

    By following the procedures and guidelines issued centrally, the benefits likely to be achieved include the following:

    Needed documents and information can be easily accessible:

    A standard method of describing and arranging records across the University will assist in document and information identification and retrieval for purposes from audits and legislative compliance, to reuse of management information.

    Reduced need for excessive equipment for storing records:

    An appropriate Retention and Disposal Schedule will set out standard time periods for which University records should be retained. By destroying records no longer required, the need for equipment for the storage of paper or electronic records is reduced.

    The University's cultural history is safeguarded:

    The Retention and Disposal schedules also enable vital records required for longer time periods, and those of archival value, to be identified and safeguarded.

    Increased productivity and reduced time spent searching for needed documents:

    Administrative and clerical staff spend a significant amount of their time searching for information or documents created within their own office or elsewhere within the University and a clear set of RM procedures will improve the efficiency of that process.

    Accountability throughout the Records Life Cycle:

    Records testify to the authority behind the decision making processes of the University and provide audit trails when both internal and external audits are required.

  • Question 4. How Does Records Management Relate To The Freedom Of Information Act?

    Answer :

    Poor records management is not of itself a breach of the Act, but the Act did stress that good records management is essential to the process of responding to requests. The Act sets out strict timetables for compliance with a request, so it makes sense to have systems in place that help to ensure such timetables are adhered to with minimum effort.

    If the University fails to satisfy an enquiry either in what it supplies or how it deals with the enquirer, then appeals can be made to the Information Commissioner who can impose requirements on the University. Good records management will assist in avoiding such circumstances arising.

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  • Question 5. How Does Records Management Relate To The Data Protection Act?

    Answer :

    The Data Protection Act applies to personal information relating to living individuals. The gathering, storage and processing of that data has to conform with a number of principles including its gathering and retention for specific purposes, the secure retention of the data, the ability to recover it when a Data Subject submits a request, and ensuring that it is kept for no longer than is necessary for the purpose for which it is held. Good records management policies and procedures will ensure that there is compliance with the Act.

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  • Question 6. What Is A Records Retention And Disposal Schedule?

    Answer :

    A records Retention and Disposal Schedule is a control document that sets out the periods for which an organisation’s business records should be retained to meet its operational needs and to comply with legal and other requirements. It forms a key element of the University's records management policy. It consists of timetables that set out when individual or groups of records are due for review, transfer to an archive and/or destruction.

    In response to compliance with current legislation eg the Freedom of Information Act 2000, they make it easier to establish whether or not a record exists when a request is received. Using such schedules will also give the public confidence that the University has adequate procedures for identifying records that have been requested.

  • Question 7. Why Is A Records Retention And Disposal Schedule Necessary?

    Answer :

    A records Retention & Disposal Schedule is an essential component of an efficient and effective records management system. Properly developed and consistently implemented, a Records Retention & Disposal Schedule protects the interests of the organisation and its stakeholders by ensuring that business records are kept for as long as they are needed to meet operational needs and to comply with legal requirements, and are then disposed of securely.

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  • Question 8. What Does A Records Retention And Disposal Schedule Cover?

    Answer :

    A records Retention & Disposal Schedule provides generic guidance on retention of records which are commonly generated in the course of:

    • core work
    • developing relationships with stakeholders
    • the management of the institutions themselves as corporate bodies

    It covers key groups of records generated by the common business functions and business activities. In the case of the University these will include Student Records, Financial Records, Personnel Records, Health & Safety Records, etc.

    The Schedule being used for Records Management at the University is based on research and consultation with a wide range of institutions. However, it is not intended to be either totally prescriptive or exhaustive. A certain amount of individual judgement will still have to be made in dealing with some records.

  • Question 9. How Are 'retention Years' Measured?

    Answer :

    • By the very nature of Retention & Disposal Schedules it is essential that records are dated and that they are filed or stored in some manner that identifies the date or (at a minimum) the year of creation. The Schedules will then advise as to how many 'years' after that date the records should be retained for before disposal. For example:
    • Current academic year + 5 years OR Life of course + 1 year
    • There can be some confusion as to whether ‘year’ relates to the UK fiscal year, the University financial year, the ‘academic’ year or the calendar year. Some record sequences relate directly to an academic year whether that starts on 25 September or 28 September or 1 October (depending on which date is a Monday).
    • In the event of the schedule stating that the (academic year) records can be disposed of after (for example) three years it is advisable to take this to be ‘after the end of the calendar year, three years after the end of the academic year’.
    • For example, a record created on 5 November 2005 in the academic year 2005/06 with a 'Current academic year + 3 years' retention period could be considered for disposal after 31 December 2009.
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  • Question 10. Should Electronic Records Be Treated Any Differently To Paper-based Records?

    Answer :

    No. The principles underlying records management - creation, retention, identification, and retrieval of records - apply equally to both electronic and paper records. This means that procedures for e-mail and information held on shared and personal hard drives have to be as robust and detailed as those for other records.

  • Sours: https://www.wisdomjobs.com/e-university/records-management-interview-questions.html

    Interview questions records

    Publisher

    Records officer interview questions & answers..

    In this post, you can reference some of the most common interview questions for a records officer interview along with appropriate answer samples. If you need more job interview materials, you can reference them at the end of this post.

    1. Tell me about your ability to work under pressure?

    Answer tips

    You may say that you thrive under certain types of pressure. Give an example that relates to the type of position applied for.
    Mention routine pressure you face, such as dealing with deadlines on a regular basis.
    Try not to use an example where you created the pressure yourself, by waiting too long to start something, or by handling a task irresponsibly at the beginning. For example, working under pressure to meet a customer’s deadline could be a good example, but not if you had waited too long to start the project.
    Answer samples

    “Pressure is actually a catalyst to my work. When there is an imperative deadline, I refocus my energy into my work which in fact, has helped me to produce some of my best works. (Give examples) I guess you can say I thrive under pressure.”

    2. What field experience do you have for a RECORDS OFFICER POSITION?

    Answer tips

    Speak about specifics that relate to the position you are applying for. If you do not have specific experience, get as close as you can.

    If you are being asked this question from your employer then you can explain your experience. Tell the employer what responsibilities you were performing during your job. You can tell what programs you developed and what modules you worked on. What were your achievements regarding different programs.

    Answer sample

    I have been working with computers since 2001. I also have a degree in network support/computer repair. I have built my last 3 computers, have work with Dell as an employee. So I have around 15 years experience working with computers.

    3. What have you done to improve your knowledge for a RECORDS OFFICER POSITION IN THE LAST YEAR?

    Try to include improvement activities that relate to the job. A wide variety of activities can be mentioned as positive self-improvement. Have some good ones handy to mention.

    Employers look for applicants who are goal-oriented. Show a desire for continuous learning by listing hobbies non-work related. Regardless of what hobbies you choose to showcase, remember that the goal is to prove self-sufficiency, time management, and motivation.

    Answer samples

    Everyone should learn from his or her mistakes. I always try to consult my mistakes with my kith and kin especially with those senior to me.

    I enrolled myself into a course useful for the next version of our current project. I attended seminars on personal development and managerial skills improvement.

    4. Tell me about yourself

    This is a common question during an interview, possibly the most asked. It is used as an ice breaker, gets you talking about something comfortable, but you need to have something prepared for a response. However, you don’t want it to sound memorized. The fact is, the interviewer isn’t interested in your life story. Unless asked otherwise, focus on education, your career and present situations. You should work chronologically, starting as far back as possible and working until present.

    5. Why do you believe we should hire you?

    This question needs to be carefully answered as it is your opportunity to stick out from the rest of the applicants. You should focus on skills that you have, including those not yet mentioned. Simply responding “because I’m really good” or “I really need a job” isn’t going to work. You shouldn’t assume the skills of other applicants or their strengths, focus on yourself. Tell the interviewer why you are a good fit for the position, what makes you a good employee, and what you can provide the company. Keep it brief while highlighting achievements.

    6. What knowledge do you have about the company?

    You should do your research prior to the interview. Look into background history of the company, this will help you stick out. Learn about main people, have they been in the news lately? The interviewer doesn’t expect you to know dates and certain people, but showing that you have enough interest to research the company is a positive impression.

    7. Why are you leaving last job?

    Although this would seem like a simple question, it can easily become tricky. You shouldn’t mention salary being a factor at this point. If you’re currently employed, your response can focus on developing and expanding your career and even yourself. If you’re current employer is downsizing, remain positive and brief. If your employer fired you, prepare a solid reason. Under no circumstance should you discuss any drama or negativity, always remain positive.

    8. What do you consider to be your best strength?

    This question allows you to brag on yourself, but keep in mind that the interviewer wants strengths relative to the position. For example, being a problem solver, a motivator, and being able to perform under pressure, positive attitude and loyal. You will also need examples that back your answers up for illustration of the skill.

    9. What do you consider to be your biggest weakness?

    This can be a tricky question to respond to, if you suggest you have no weaknesses you’re going to appear as a lair or egotistical. You should respond realistically by mentioning small work related weaknesses. Although many try to answer using a positive skill in disguise as a weakness, like “I expect co-workers to have the same commitment” or “I am a perfectionist”. However, it is recommended that there is some honesty and the weaknesses are true, and then emphasize on how you have overcome it or working to improve it. The purpose of this question is to see how you view and evaluate yourself.

    10. What do you see yourself doing in five years?

    This is another question looking towards job commitment. Some people go through jobs like socks because they don’t have a life plan, and your answer can show insight into this. It can also be used for finding out if you are the type that sets goals at all in life, because those that make long-term goals are usually more reliable. Also, your goals can provide insight on your personality too.

    You should respond with an answer that shows progression in your career is on track with your route in the company. It’s important to do your research on company prospects, this way you understand what to expect and if it’s in your long-term goal. Interviewers don’t want to set you on a path that won’t provide the results you want, resulting in you resigning.

    11. What are your salary expectations?

    This question is like a loaded gun, tricky and dangerous if you’re not sure what you are doing. It’s not uncommon for people to end up talking salary before really selling their skills, but knowledge is power as this is a negotiation after all. Again, this is an area where doing your research will be helpful as you will have an understanding of average salary.

    One approach is asking the interviewer about the salary range, but to avoid the question entirely, you can respond that money isn’t a key factor and you’re goal is to advance in your career. However, if you have a minimum figure in mind and you believe you’re able to get it, you may find it worth trying.

    12. Do you have any questions?

    It is common for this question to to be asked every time, and you should have questions ready. By asking questions you are able to show that you have enough interest to do some research, and that you want to learn all that you can. You should limit the questions to no more than three or four.

    You can try asking questions that focus on areas where you can be an asset. Other options include asking about what your position would be, and how fast they expect you to become productive. Also, asking about the next step in the process and when to expect to hear about the position.

    Top job interview materials:

    For more details, please click links below:

    1. Top 11 job interview books

    2. Top 12 secrets to win every job interviews

    III. Job interview materials

    1. Research

    Prior to the interview, doing your research is important. You need to know as much as you can regarding products, services, customers, even who the competition is, as this will provide an edge in knowledge and being able to address the company requirements. The more knowledge you have about the company, the higher your chances for selling yourself for the position during the interview. Also, knowing the culture of the company will provide great insight into how satisfied you will be with the job.

    2. Practice

    Interviews are not always the same format, and they do not have to follow a certain style, but there are certain questions that can be expected. It will help if you practice giving your answer to the more common questions asked in interviews, these regard personal strengths and weaknesses, and why you are the best for the position.

    3. Examples

    You can say you can do something, but being able to provide examples of you doing these things is entirely different. Fogarty advises that you “come with your toolbox filled with examples of prior work achievements. You need to be prepared for the recruiter’s questions and to anticipate them based on job position requirements. Consider examples with strong strategies used, and answer with details rather than generalities. For instance, say “Yes, that is something I have done previously. Here is an example.” He added that you should ask the interviewer “Did that help answer your question?”.

    4. Dressing for Success

    First impressions can break or make any relation, including with the interviewer. You will be judged from the moment you arrive at the door. If you reached this point, you have hopefully done company research already and have an understanding of their culture, what they expect, and if they have a dress code. If you under-dress, you can appear to be too relaxed and doesn’t take things seriously. However, overdressing can be perceived s over compensation. If you were not able to find dress code information, it’s best to dress sharply, but not over dressed.

    5. Remain calm

    By preparing early, you can maintain control. You should have your route planned out, provide additional time for unexpected delays such s traffic, and prepare what you need the day before the interview. You need to speak clearly, and body language is important. You should smile when greeted, and keep in mind that the interviewer is a regular person like you, and they could be nervous as well.

    6. Honesty

    Some candidates think using techniques to avoid difficult questions is a good thing, but if you simply don’t believe you have a strong skill, just let the interviewer know rather than answering with examples that do not relate to the position. It appears better to be honest that you may not have that certain skill, but have skills related, and that you would be glad to list them.

    7. Closing the deal

    During an interview, this is one of the biggest on more common mistakes. Once the interview is over, both you and the interviewer should have a good idea on where you stand. Interviewers likely already has a good idea by the last handshake if you will move to the next step or not. During the last handshake, be upfront. Being confident can go a long way. If you believe the interview went well, be bold and ask the interviewer where you stand. If you don’t think it went well, you probably have your answer already.

    8. Ask questions

    Fogarty also suggests that you prepare great questions for the interview. He stated that nothing impresses more than a great question that indicates company research was conducted, but research on the position too. “These questions make me think, ‘Wow, they really did their homework. Not only do they have knowledge of the company, but the role too.”

    Sours: https://www.popularinterviewquestions.info/records-officer-interview-questions-answers.html
    STAR INTERVIEW QUESTIONS and Answers (PASS GUARANTEED!)

    Public Records Officer Interview Questions

    1Share an experience when you applied new technology or information in your job. How did it help your company? 2Share an experience in which you successfully assisted a user in finding archival materials.3Provide an example of when you set expectations and monitored the performance of subordinates. What guidance and direction did you find most effective?4Provide an example of a time when you successfully organized a diverse group of people to accomplish a task.5What is the key to success when communicating with the public.6Share an experience you had in dealing with a difficult person and how you handled the situation. 7Share an experience in which you successfully shared a difficult piece of information. (Make sure that the candidate has open lines of communication.)8Tell me about a recent experience you've had working with your hands. 9Tell me how you organize, plan, and prioritize your work.10What are some long-range objectives that you developed in your last job? What did you do to achieve them?11Tell me about an experience in which you analyzed information and evaluated results to choose the best solution to a problem.12Share an effective approach to working with a large amount of information/data. How has your approach affected your company?13Share an example of a time you had to gather information from multiple sources. How did you determine which information was relevant?14How would you rate your writing skills? (Ask for an example that demonstrates great writing skills.)15Provide an example of a time when you were able to demonstrate excellent listening skills. What was the situation and outcome?
    Sours: https://www.jobinterviewquestions.com/archivists/public-records-officer

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    Look here. And she handed me the phone. I stared at the screen and sat down on the table with a groan.



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