Cisco router rack mount

Cisco router rack mount DEFAULT
  •  Product Description Cisco Integrated Services Router - router - rack-mountable
  •  Device Type Router - 4-port switch (integrated)
  •  Enclosure Type Rack-mountable
  •  WAN Ports Qty 1
  •  Data Link Protocol Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet
  •  Performance Encryption throughput: Mbps
  •  Network / Transport Protocol IPSec, PPPoE, DHCP, DNS, L2TPv3
  •  Routing Protocol OSPF, IS-IS, RIP-1, RIP-2, BGP, EIGRP, HSRP, DVMRP, VRRP, PIM-SM, static IP routing, IGMPv3, GRE, PIM-SSM, policy-based routing (PBR), MPLS, Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD), RSVP
  •  Remote Management Protocol SNMP, RMON, CLI, TR
  •  Features Class-Based Weighted Fair Queuing (CBWFQ), Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED), Access Control List (ACL) support, Quality of Service (QoS), Dynamic Multipoint VPN (DMVPN), NetFlow, Maximum Ratio Combining (MRC), IPFIX, cyclic shift diversity (CSD), Location ID Separation Protocol (LISP), packet aggregation A-MPDU, packet aggregation A-MSDU, Management Information Base (MIB) II, Application Visibility and Control (AVC), Authentication, Authorization and Accounting (AAA), Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS), Encapsulated Remote SPAN (ERSPAN), Embedded Event Manager (EEM)
  •  Compliant Standards IEEE Q, IEEE i, IEEE ah, IEEE ag, IEEE r
  •  Power AC V (50/60 Hz)
  •  Dimensions (WxDxH) in x 6 in x in
  •  Weight lbs
  •  Manufacturer Warranty 1-year warranty
Sours: https://www.zones.com/site/product/index.html?id=

Cisco Router Gigabit LAN Rack-mountable 1U

General Specifications Device Type Router Enclosure Type Desktop &#; modular &#; 2U Connectivity Technology Wired Data Link Protocol Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet Routing Protocol OSPF, IS-IS, BGP, EIGRP, DVMRP, PIM-SM, IGMPv3, GRE, PIM-SSM, static IPv4 routing, static IPv6 routing Remote Management Protocol SNMP, RMON Features Firewall protection, VPN support, MPLS support, Syslog support, IPv6 support, Class-Based Weighted Fair Queuing (CBWFQ), Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) Compliant Standards IEEE Q, IEEE af, IEEE ah, IEEE ah, IEEE ag RAM MB (installed) / 2 GB (max) Flash Memory MB (installed) / 8 GB (max) Status Indicators Link activity, power Communications Type Voice / fax module Digital Ports Qty 16 IP Telephony Voice Codecs G, G, G, G, G, Ga, Gab, G Expansion / Connectivity Interfaces 3 x 10Base-T/Base-TX/Base-T &#; RJ ¦ Management : 1 x console &#; RJ ¦ Management : 1 x console &#; mini-USB Type B ¦ Serial : 1 x auxiliary &#; RJ ¦ USB : 2 x 4 PIN USB Type A Expansion Slots Total (Free) 4 ( 4 ) x HWIC ¦ 2 ( 1 ) x PVDM ¦ 2 ( 1 ) x CompactFlash Card ¦ 1 ( 1 ) x Expansion Slot Power Power Device Power supply &#; internal Voltage Required AC / V ( 50/60 Hz ) Miscellaneous Width cm Depth cm Height cm Compliant Standards CISPR 22 Class A, CISPR 24, EN, EN Class A, EN, CAN/CSA-E, ICES Class A, CS, AS/NZS , FCC CFR47 Part 15, EN, UL , IEC , EN , CSA C No. , BSMI CNS Software / System Requirements Software Included Cisco IOS Unified Communications Brief Overview Voice / fax module Rack-mountable Modular &#; 2U Ethernet Firewall protection RJ These reliable and effective Cisco Routers are the single unit enclosure type with rack mountable modular. And offering data link protocol through Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and Fast Ethernet with IPSec, L2TPv3 Transport Protocol. The compliant standards are IEEE Q, IEEE af, IEEE ag. The Routing Protocol consists of OSPF, IS-IS, BGP, EIGRP, DVMRP, PIM-SM, static IP Routing, IGMPv3, GRE, PIM-SSM, static IPv4 routing, static IPv6 routing. The Remote Management Protocol SNMP, RMON and TR The interface slots are manageable through 2x10base-T/Base-TXBase-T-RJ with excellent RAM which is standard with MB installed and 2GB Max and flash memory is MB installed and 8GB max.

SKU: CISCOV/K9

Sours: https://digidevicesonline.com/shop/networking/routers/ciscorouter-gigabit-lan-rack-mountable-1u/
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Cisco Installation and Configuration Guide


Rack-Mounting, Tabletop Installation, and Cabling


This chapter explains how to install a Cisco router in a rack in a general tabletop or workbench installation, how to attach cables, and how to power on the router.

This chapter contains the following sections:

Preparing to Install the Cisco Router

Installing the Router

Attaching a Chassis Ground Connection

Connecting Port Adapter Cables

Connecting I/O Cables

Attaching the Alarm Port Cable

Using the Cable-Management Bracket

Connecting Power

The Cisco router operates as either a tabletop or a rack-mounted unit. A rack-mount kit is standard equipment included with the Cisco router when it is shipped from the factory. The kit provides the hardware needed to mount the router in a standard four-post inch equipment rack or a two-post rack or a inch equipment rack.

If you are not rack-mounting your Cisco  router, place it on a sturdy tabletop or platform.

Preparing to Install the Cisco Router

Before installing your Cisco router, you should consider the power and cabling requirements that must be in place at your installation site, the equipment you need to install the router, and the environmental conditions your installation site must meet to maintain normal operation. This section guides you through the process of preparing for your router installation and the installation in a rack.

This section contains the following topics:

Tools and Parts Required

Electrical Equipment Guidelines

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Site Requirement Guidelines

Figure  Dimensions of Cisco Router

1

in.

3

in.

2

in.

  

Table  provides dimensions and weight information.

Cisco  

Dimensions

in. x in. x in. ( cm x cm x cm)

Weight

Chassis fully configured with a port adapter ~ lb ( kg)


Tools and Parts Required

Your Cisco chassis is fully assembled at the factory; no assembly is required. However, you need the following tools and equipment to install the chassis and the rack-mount and cable-management kit:

Number 2 Phillips screwdriver

A 3/inch flat-blade screwdriver

Tape measure (optional)

Level (optional)

Grounding lug and wires:

A grounding lug with two number screw holes with a inch (mm) spacing between them

A wire receptacle large enough to accept a 6-AWG multistrand, copper wire

Two Phillips machine screws with locking washers—M5 (metric), inch (mm) pitch, inch (8-mm) length

A crimping tool to fit the grounding lug wire receptacle

One grounding wire—6-AWG, inch (mm) diameter, with approximately inch (mm) insulation, for a total wire diameter of approximately inches ( mm). The wire length depends on your router location and site environment.

The rack-mount and cable-management kit includes the following parts:

Two rack-mount brackets for mounting the chassis in the rack

One cable-management bracket

One AC power cable-retention clip (if you ordered a single AC power supply)

Four x in. screws to secure the rack-mount brackets to the chassis

Four x in. screws to secure the rack-mount brackets to a inch rack

Four 8 x in. screws to secure the rack-mount brackets to a inch rack

One M4 x mm screw to attach the cable-management bracket to the rack-mount bracket

In addition, you might need the following external equipment:

Data service unit (DSU) to connect each serial port to an external network

T1 channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) that converts the High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) synchronous serial data stream into a T1 data stream with the correct framing and ones density to connect a serial port to a T1 network. (Some telephone systems require a minimum number of 1 bits per time unit in a data stream, called ones density.) Several T1 CSU/DSU devices are available as additional equipment, and most provide a V, EIA/TIA, or EIA electrical interface.

Ethernet transceiver

Token Ring multistation access unit (MSAU)

ESD-preventative wrist strap

Power cord

Appropriate cables to connect the router to the console and auxiliary ports

Electrical Equipment Guidelines

The port adapter is designed to be removed and replaced while the system is operating without presenting an electrical hazard or damage to the system.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, which occurs when electronic cards or components are improperly handled, can result in complete or intermittent system failures. Each port adapter consists of a printed circuit board that is fixed in a metal carrier. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, connectors, and a handle are integral components of the carrier. Although the carrier helps protect the boards, use an antistatic strap whenever handling the port adapter. Handle the carriers by the handle and the carrier edges only; never touch the boards or connector pins.

Site Requirement Guidelines


Warning Before you install, operate, or service the system, read the "Site Preparation and Safety Information" section of the Cisco Series Internet Routers Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information document. This section contains important safety information you should know before working with the system. Statement


The environmental monitoring functionality in the Cisco router protects the system and components from potential damage from overvoltage and overtemperature conditions. To ensure normal operation and avoid unnecessary maintenance, plan your site configuration and prepare your site before installation.After installation, make sure the site maintains an ambient temperature of 32°F through °F (0°C through 40°C), and keep the area around the chassis as free from dust as is practical.

Planning a proper location for the Cisco router and the layout of your equipment rack or wiring closet is essential for successful system operation. Equipment placed too close together or inadequately ventilated can cause system overtemperature conditions. In addition, chassis panels made inaccessible by poor equipment placement can make system maintenance difficult. Following are precautions that can help avoid problems during installation and ongoing operation.

Figure  Airflow Through the Chassis

When you plan the location and layout of your equipment rack or wiring closet, you need to consider how air flows through your router. The Cisco router draws cooling air in through the intake vents on the front of the chassis and moves the air across the internal components and out the exhaust vents on the rear of the chassis. Figure  shows airflow through the router.

Temperature sensors on the system board monitor the internal air temperature and send warning messages when the internal air temperature approaches a specified threshold. If the internal temperature exceeds the specified threshold, the system environmental monitor shuts down all internal power to prevent equipment damage from excessive heat. (See the "Environmental Monitoring and Reporting Functions" section on page  for temperature threshold information.)

Installing the Router

This section explains how to install a Cisco router in a general tabletop or workbench installation and in a rack, and how to attach I/O, port adapter, and power cables. This section contains the following topics:

General Tabletop or Workbench Installation

Rack-Mounting a Cisco Router

Attaching the Chassis Rack-Mount and Cable-Management Brackets

Installing the Chassis in the Rack

General Tabletop or Workbench Installation

The router should already be in the area where you will install it, and your installation location should already be determined. If not, see the "Preparing to Install the Cisco Router" section, and the "Site Requirement Guidelines" section.

When installing a Cisco router on a workbench or tabletop, ensure that the surface is clean and in a safe location and that you have considered the following:

The router requires at least 3 inches ( cm) of clearance at the inlet and exhaust vents (the front and back sides of the router).

The router should be installed off the floor. (Dust that accumulates on the floor is drawn into the interior of the router by the cooling fans. Excessive dust inside the router can cause overtemperature conditions and component failures.)

There must be approximately 19 inches ( cm) of clearance at the front and rear of the router for installing and replacing router parts—such as the port adapter, SFP GBIC module, or CompactFlash Disk—or accessing network cables or equipment.

A blank port adapter is installed if a port adapter or service adapter is not in place.

The router will receive adequate ventilation (it is not being installed in an enclosed cabinet where ventilation is inadequate).

If you plan to install the cable-management bracket, unpack and have handy the cable-management bracket and one M4 x mm screw.

An adequate chassis ground (earth) connection exists for your router chassis.


Warning This product relies on the building's installation for short-circuit (overcurrent) protection. Ensure that a fuse or circuit breaker no larger than  VAC, 15A U.S. ( VAC, 10A international) is used on the phase conductors (all current-carrying conductors). Statement 13


Following are the steps for installing a Cisco router on a workbench or tabletop:


Step 1 Remove any debris and dust from the tabletop or workbench, as well as the surrounding area. Also make sure your path between the router and its new location is unobstructed.

Step 2 On the chassis, ensure that the port adapter latch is in the locked position.

Step 3 Lift the chassis by placing your hands around the chassis sides and lifting the chassis from underneath. To prevent injury, avoid sudden twists or moves.

Step 4 Place the router on the tabletop or workbench.

Step 5 Ensure that there is at least 3 inches ( cm) of clearance at the inlet and exhaust vents of the router and no exhaust air from other equipment will be drawn into the chassis. Also, ensure that there is approximately 19 inches ( cm) of clearance at the front and rear of the chassis.


This completes the general tabletop or workbench installation.

Rack-Mounting a Cisco Router

The chassis mounts to two rack posts with brackets that attach to either the front or the rear sides of the chassis. The inside width between the two posts or mounting strips (left and right) must be at least inches ( cm).

Some equipment racks provide a power strip along the length of one of the mounting strips. Figure  shows a typical four-post equipment rack with a power strip along one of the back posts. If your rack has this feature, consider the position of the strip when planning fastener points to ensure that you will be able to pull the port adapter, SFP GBIC module, or CompactFlash Disk straight out of their respective slots.

The inlet and exhaust ports for cooling air are located on the front and rear of the chassis, respectively, so multiple routers can be stacked in a rack with little or no vertical clearance.

Before beginning the installation, determine the type of rack you are using and whether or not you want the chassis front- or rear-mounted.


Note If you are rear-mounting the chassis and want to use the cable-management bracket, you must purchase a second rack-mount kit. You need another rack-mount bracket to attach to the front of the chassis. After it is attached to the chassis, install the cable-management bracket to the rack-mount bracket.


Attaching the Chassis Rack-Mount and Cable-Management Brackets

This section explains how to install the rack-mount and cable-management brackets at the front and the rear of a Cisco router. Before installing the chassis in the rack, you must install a rack-mount bracket on each side of the front or rear of the chassis.

The parts and tools required for installing the rack-mount brackets and cable-management bracket are listed in the "Tools and Parts Required" section.

Installing Rack-Mount Brackets on the Front of the Chassis

Figure  Attaching the Rack-Mount Brackets to the Front of the Chassis

1

Rack-mount bracket

2

4 screws, x in., for use with a inch rack

4 screws, 8 x in., for use with a inch rack


Determine whether you want the chassis to be flush-mounted or recessed. Figure  shows the brackets being attached for a front rack-mount. Depending on the bracket holes you use, the router will protrude or be recessed in the rack.

To install the rack-mount and cable-management brackets on a Cisco router for a front rack-mount configuration, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Locate the threaded holes in the front sides of the chassis.

Step 2 Align the rack-mount bracket (1) to the side of the router. Depending on which set of rack-mount bracket holes you choose to use to attach the rack-mount bracket to the router, the chassis will either be recessed in the rack, or protrude from the rack.

Step 3 Insert and tighten the two screws.

Step 4 Repeat Step 1through Step 3 on the other side of the router.


This completes the steps for attaching the rack-mount brackets to the Cisco  router.

To install the cable-management bracket, go to the "Attaching the Cable-Management Bracket" section. If you are not installing the cable-management bracket, go to the "Installing the Chassis in the Rack" section.

Attaching the Cable-Management Bracket

Figure  Installing the Cable-Management Bracket

1

Cable-management bracket

2

M4 x mm screw



Step 1 Align the cable-management bracket to the rack-mount bracket on the left side of the Cisco router.

Step 2 Using a Phillips screwdriver and the M4 x mmscrew, thread and tighten the screw to the cable-management bracket.


This completes the procedure for installing the cable-management bracket on a Cisco router for a front rack-mount configuration. Go to the "Installing the Chassis in the Rack" section.

Installing Rack-Mount Brackets on the Rear of the Chassis

Figure  Attaching the Rack-Mount Brackets to the Rear of the Chassis

1

Rack-mount bracket

2

4 screws, x in., for use with a inch rack

4 screws, 8 x in., for use with a inch rack


To install the rack-mount and cable-management brackets on a Cisco router for a rear rack-mount configuration, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Locate the threaded holes in the rear sides of the chassis.

Step 2 Align the rack-mount bracket to the side of the router. Depending on which set of holes on the rack-mount bracket that you use, the router will either be recessed in the rack or protrude from the rack.

Step 3 Insert and tighten the two screws.

Step 4 Repeat Step 1 through Step 3 on the other side of the router.



Note To use the cable-management bracket with the Cisco router rear-mounted, you must purchase a second rack-mount kit, attach a rack-mount bracket to the left front of the chassis, and attach the cable-management bracket to it. See the "Attaching the Cable-Management Bracket" section for cable-management bracket installation instructions.


This completes the procedure for installing the rack-mount and cable-management brackets on a Cisco router for a rear rack-mount configuration. Go to the "Installing the Chassis in the Rack" section.

Installing the Chassis in the Rack


Caution To prevent injury, review the safety precautions in this chapter before installing the router in a rack.

After installing the brackets on the chassis, you mount the router by securing the rack-mount brackets to two posts or mounting strips in the rack using the four screws provided. Because the brackets support the weight of the entire chassis, be sure to use all four screws to fasten the two rack-mount brackets to the rack posts. Figure  and Figure  show typical installations in two-post and four-post equipment racks.

We recommend that you allow at least 1 or 2 inches ( or cm) of vertical clearance between the router and any equipment directly above and below it.

To install the chassis in the rack, complete the following steps:


Step 1 On the chassis, ensure that the port adapter latch is in the locked position and tightened, and that the CompactFlash Disk and any SFP GBIC modules are installed.

Step 2 Make sure that your path to the rack is unobstructed. If the rack is on wheels, ensure that the brakes are engaged or that the rack is otherwise stabilized.

Step 3 Position the chassis so that the front end is closest to you. Lift the chassis and move it to the rack. To prevent injury, avoid sudden twists or moves.

Step 4 Slide the chassis into the rack, pushing it back until the brackets (installed at the front or rear of the chassis) meet the mounting strips or posts on both sides of the equipment rack.


For two-post rack installation, go to the "Two-Post Rack Installation" section.

For four-post rack installation, go to the "Four-Post Rack Installation" section.

Two-Post Rack Installation


Note Inner clearance (the width between the inner sides of the two posts or rails) must be at least inches ( cm). The height of the chassis is inches ( cm). Airflow through the chassis is from front to back.


Figure  Installing the Cisco Router in a Two-Post Rack

1

Two-post rack

3

Four x inch screws

2

Screw hole for the cable-management bracket

  


Step 1 Make sure that the port adapter latch is in the locked position and the screw is tightened.

Step 2 Make sure the rack brakes are locked or the rack is stabilized.

Step 3 Position the router so the front is closest to you and lift it carefully into the rack. To prevent injury, avoid any sudden twists or moves.

Step 4 Slide the chassis into the rack, pushing it back until the brackets meet the mounting strips or posts on both sides of the rack.

Step 5 Keeping the brackets flush against the posts or mounting strips, align the holes in the brackets with the holes on the rack or mounting strip.

Step 6 For each bracket, insert and tighten two x inch screws to the rack.


This completes the procedure for installing the chassis in the rack. Proceed to the "Attaching a Chassis Ground Connection" section to continue the installation.

Four-Post Rack Installation


Note Inner clearance (the width between the inner sides of the two posts or rails) must be at least inches ( cm). The height of the chassis is inches ( cm). Airflow through the chassis is from front to back.


Figure  Installing the Cisco Router in a Four-Post Rack

1

Four-post rack

3

Four x inch screws

2

Screw hole for the cable-management bracket

  


Step 1 Make sure that the port adapter latch is in the locked position and the screw is tightened.

Step 2 Make sure the rack brakes are locked or the rack is stabilized.

Step 3 Position the router so the front is closest to you and lift it carefully into the rack. To prevent injury, avoid any sudden twists or moves.

Step 4 Slide the chassis into the rack, pushing it back until the brackets meet the mounting strips or posts on both sides of the rack.

Step 5 Keeping the brackets flush against the posts or mounting strips, align the holes in the brackets with the holes on the rack or mounting strip.

Step 6 For each bracket, insert and tighten two x inch screws to the rack.


This completes the procedure for installing the chassis in the rack. Proceed to the "Attaching a Chassis Ground Connection" section to continue the installation.

Attaching a Chassis Ground Connection

Before you connect power or turn on power to your router, we strongly recommend that you provide an adequate chassis ground (earth) connection for the router chassis. Chassis ground connectors are provided on each Cisco router chassis. (See Figure )

To ensure the chassis ground connection that you provide is adequate, you will need the following parts and tools:

One grounding lug—Must have two number screw holes that have a inch (mm) spacing between them, and a wire receptacle large enough to accept a 6-AWG multistrand, copper wire. This grounding lug is not available from Cisco Systems; electrical-connector vendors provide this type of grounding lug.

Two Phillips machine screws with locking washers—M5 (metric), inch (mm) pitch, inch (8-mm) length. These screws are not available from Cisco Systems; they are available from a commercial hardware vendor.

One grounding wire—6-AWG, inch (mm) diameter, with approximately inch (mm) insulation, for a total wire diameter of approximately  inches ( mm). The wire length is dependent on your router location and site environment. This wire is not available from Cisco Systems; it is available from a commercial cable vendor.

Number 2 Phillips screwdriver

Crimping tool large enough to accommodate the diameter of the wire receptacle on your grounding lug

Wire stripper

Figure  Locating the Chassis Ground Connector

1

Fan vents

2

Chassis ground connector


Use the following procedure to attach the grounding lug to the chassis ground connector on your router chassis:

Figure  Attaching a Grounding Lug to the Chassis Ground Connector

1

Chassis ground connector

3

Screws

2

Grounding lug

4

Wire



Note The grounding lug and Phillips scres are not available from Cisco Systems. Get the grounding lug from an electrical-connector vendor and the screws from a hardware vendor. See "Tools and Parts Required" section.



Step 1 Use the wire stripper to strip one end of the 6-AWG wire approximately inches ( mm).

Step 2 Insert the 6-AWG wire (4) into the wire receptacle on the grounding lug.

Step 3 Use the crimping tool to carefully crimp the wire receptacle around the wire; this step is required to ensure a proper mechanical connection.

Step 4 Locate the chassis ground connector (1) on the rear of your router chassis.

Step 5 Insert the two screws (3) through the holes in the grounding lug (2).

Step 6 Use the Number 2 Phillips screwdriver to carefully tighten the screws until the grounding lug is held firmly to the chassis. Do not overtighten the screws.

Step 7 Connect the opposite end of the grounding wire to the appropriate grounding point at your site to ensure an adequate chassis ground.


This completes the procedure for attaching a chassis ground connection. Go to the following cabling sections for information on attaching cables.

Connecting Port Adapter Cables

The instructions for connecting the cables for the port adapter installed in the Cisco router are contained in the respective configuration notes for each port adapter. For example, if you are connecting the optical fiber cables for the PA-POS-OC3 port adapter, refer to the configuration note PA-POS-OC3 Packet OC-3 Port Adapter Installation and Configuration at http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/core//port_adp/sonet_pa/paposoc3/index.htm. Port adapter documents are also available on the Documentation CD-ROM.

Connecting I/O Cables

This section contains connection equipment information for the Gigabit Ethernet, console, and auxiliary ports.


Warning The ports labeled "Ethernet," "10BaseT," "Token Ring," "Console," and "AUX" are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits. Because the BRI circuits are treated like telephone-network voltage, avoid connecting the SELV circuit to the telephone network voltage (TNV) circuits. Statement 22


Connecting Console and Auxiliary Port Cables


Note The console cable kit product number is ACSASYN.


The Cisco router has a DCE-mode console port for connecting a console terminal, and a DTE-mode auxiliary port for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or other router) to your router.


Note Both the console and the auxiliary ports are asynchronous serial ports; any devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission. (Asynchronous is the most common type of serial device; for example, most modems are asynchronous devices.)


The Cisco router uses RJ ports for both the auxiliary port and console port.

Before connecting a terminal to the console port, configure the terminal to match the router console port as follows: baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bits ( 8N1). After you establish normal router operation, you can disconnect the terminal.

For console and auxiliary port pinouts for the RJ connector, see Appendix A, "Cisco Router Specifications."

Adapter DTE M/F Pins 1 DCE M/F Pins MMOD Pins 2

1

4

5

5

2

20

6

8

3

2

3

3

4

7

7

7

5

7

7

7

6

3

2

2

7

6

20

20

8

5

4

4


Refer to Table  for a list of the pins used on the RJto-DB adapters, used with an RJ cable, to connect terminals and modems to the Cisco router. The cable you use may be a roll-over cable or a straight cable.

A roll-over cable can be detected by comparing the two modular ends of the cable. Holding the cables in your hand, side-by-side, with the tab at the back, the wire connected to the pin on the outside of the left plug should be the same color as the pin on the outside of the right plug. If your cable was purchased from Cisco, pin 1 will be white on one connector, and pin 8 will be white on the other (a roll-over cable reverses pins 1 and 8, 2 and 7, 3 and 6, and 4 and 5). (See Figure )

Figure  Identifying a Roll-Over Cable

1

Pin 1

3

Pin 8

2

Pin 1 and pin 8 should be the same color

  

The Cisco router ships with a rolled cable. Connection to a terminal or a modem will require an RJto-DB adapter, and possibly a DBto-DB9 adapter. Refer to Table  for the cable and adapter configurations that can be used to connect terminals and modems to the Cisco router.

Access Server Port RJ Cable Type DB Adapter End Device

Console or auxiliary

Rolled

FDTE1

Terminal

Console or auxiliary

Straight

FDCE

Terminal

Auxiliary or console

Rolled

MMOD2

Modem


Both ports are configured as asynchronous serial ports. Figure  shows the RJ console and auxiliary port connections.

Figure  Console and Auxiliary Port RJ Connectors

1

Auxiliary port

4

Cable to modem or DCE

2

Console port

5

Cable to console terminal or DTE

3

RJ connector

  

Connecting Native Gigabit Ethernet Cables


Note See Chapter 3, "Starting and Configuring the Router," the "Configuring the Native Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces" section on page , for information on configuring and troubleshooting the Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.


The Cisco  router has three native Gigabit Ethernet interfaces and six physical Gigabit Ethernet ports, three RJ ports (copper) and three SFP GBIC ports (optical). Only three of the six ports can be in use at any one time. The three Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are directly connected to the BCM processor.

Attaching the Gigabit Ethernet Cables

The RJ ports support IEEE u (Fast Ethernet) and ab (Gigabit Ethernet) twisted-pair interfaces compliant with BASETX and BASET specifications.

The RJ port supports standard straight-through and crossover Category 5 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables with RJ connectors. Cisco Systems does not supply Category 5 UTP cables; these cables are available commercially.

See Appendix A, "Specifications," for Gigabit Ethernet RJ port specifications.

Intra-Building Lightning Protection

Shielded cables, which are grounded at both ends, are required to be used on the 10// Ethernet (RJ) port in order to be in compliance with requirement R in GRCore for a Central Office environment. This is not a requirement for customer premise installations.

Figure  Attaching the RJ Port Gigabit Ethernet Cables

1

Gigabit Ethernet port 0/0 (RJ connector)

3

Gigabit Ethernet port 0/2 (RJ connector)

2

Gigabit Ethernet port 0/1 (RJ connector)

4

Gigabit Ethernet cables with RJ connectors


Attach one, two, or three Gigabit Ethernet 10// cables to Gigabit Ethernet RJ port 0/0, port 0/1, or port 0/2.


Warning To avoid electric shock, do not connect safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits to telephone-network voltage (TNV) circuits. LAN ports contain SELV circuits, and WAN ports contain TNV circuits. Some LAN and WAN ports both use RJ connectors. Use caution when connecting cables. Statement 76


Attaching the SFP GBIC Interface Cables


Note We recommend cleaning the fiber optical cables before connecting them to the fiber optic ports. For optical-fiber cleaning information, see the Inspection and Cleaning Procedures for Fiber-Optic Connections document.


The SFP GBIC module ports support IEEE z (optical Gigabit Ethernet) interfaces compliant with BASESX and BASELX specifications.

After you install the SFP GBIC module in the Gigabit Ethernet port, you must attach the cables to the SFP GBIC module. The instructions that follow apply to all supported platforms.


Note Optical fiber cables are commercially available; they are not available from Cisco Systems.


Attaching Multimode and Single-Mode Optical Fiber Cables

If you ordered a Gigabit Ethernet SFP GBIC module with your Cisco  router, it is one of three types listed in Table 

Product Number GBIC Description Operating Distance

GLC-SX-MM=

Short wavelength (BASESX)

Contains a Class 1 laser of
nm for BASESX (short wavelength) applications.

Operates on standard multimode fiber-optic link spans of up to ft. ( m).

GLC-LH-SM=

Long wavelength/
long haul (BASELX/LH)

Contains a Class 1 laser of
nm for BASELX/LH (long wavelength) applications.

Operates on single-mode fiber-optic link spans of up to miles (10 km) or multimode spans up to ft. ( m) with mode- conditioning cable.

GLC-ZX-SM=

Extended distance (BASEZX)

Contains a Class 1 laster of
nm for BASEZX (extended wavelength) applications.

Operates on ordinary single-mode fiber-optic link spans of up to miles (70 km). Link spans of up to miles ( km) are possible using premium single-mode fiber or dispersion-shifted single-mode fiber.


For cabling specifications, including cabling information, see the online Gigabit Interface Converter (GBIC) and Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) GBIC Installation Information and Specifications.

For product numbers of SFPs supported on the Cisco , see Appendix A, "SFP GBIC Module Configurations."


Caution If you plan to use a GLC-LH-SM at distances greater than feet ( meters) over 50/micron or /micron multimode fiber, you must use the mode-conditioning patch cord to prevent data transmission problems. See the "Attaching the Mode-Conditioning Patch Cord" section.

Warning Class 1 laser product. Statement



Warning Class 1 LED product. Statement


Figure  SFP GBIC Port Connections

1

To external BASEX network

4

Gigabit Ethernet SFP GBIC port 0/1

2

Duplex connector (TX and RX)

5

TX (SFP GBIC port 0/1)

3

SFP GBIC module

6

RX (SFP GBIC port 0/1)



Step 1 Remove the plug from the SFP GBIC module so that you can insert the cables. Keep the plug for use should you ever disconnect the optical fiber cables.


Warning Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from disconnected fibers or connectors. Do not stare into beams or view directly with optical instruments. Statement


Step 2 Attach the appropriate optical fiber cable directly to the SFP GBIC module. You can use either simplex or duplex connectors for most devices. (Figure  shows a SFP GBIC module with a duplex connector being installed in SFP GBIC slot 0/1.)

For simplex connectors, two cables are required, one cable for transmit (TX) and a second cable for receive (RX).

For duplex connectors, only one cable that has both TX and RX connectors is required.


A mode-conditioning patch cord can be used with the GLC-LH-SM to allow reliable laser transmission between the single-mode laser source on the SFP GBIC module and a multimode optical fiber cable. For installation instructions, see the "Attaching the Mode-Conditioning Patch Cord" section.

Attaching the Mode-Conditioning Patch Cord

A mode-conditioning patch cord can be used with the GLC-LH-SM to allow reliable laser transmission between the single-mode laser source on the SFP GBIC and a multimode optical fiber cable.

When an unconditioned laser source designed for operation on single-mode optical fiber is directly coupled to a multimode optical fiber cable, an effect known as differential mode delay (DMD) might result in a degradation of the modal bandwidth of the optical fiber cable.

This degradation results in a decrease in the link span (the distance between a transmitter and a receiver) that can be supported reliably. The effect of DMD can be overcome by conditioning the launch characteristics of a laser source. A practical means of performing this conditioning is to use a device called a mode-conditioning patch cord.

A mode-conditioning patch cord is an optical fiber cable assembly that consists of a pair of optical fibers terminated with connector hardware. Specifically, the mode-conditioning patch cord is composed of a single-mode optical fiber permanently coupled off-center (see Offset in Figure ) to a graded-index multimode optical fiber. Figure  shows a diagram of the mode-conditioning patch cord assembly.

Figure  SFP Mode-Conditioning Patch Cord

1

Gray color identifier

5

Single-mode bar

2

To GE interface

6

Offset

3

Blue color identifier

7

Beige color identifier

4

Multimode bar

8

To cable plant



Note Figure  shows one type of mode-conditioning patch cord.


To use a mode-conditioning patch cord, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach a patch cord to the SFP GBIC module. (See Figure )

Step 2 Attach the network ends of your patch cord to the appropriate BASEX equipment in your building cable plant.

Ensure that you connect the TX and RX ports on one end of the patch cord to the RX and TX ports (respectively) on the other end. Connect TX to RX and RX to TX.


This completes the procedures for connecting the I/O cables.

Attaching the Alarm Port Cable

Figure  Connecting the Alarm Port Cable

1

Alarm port

  

If you have an alarm system, attach the alarm cable to the Cisco  router alarm port. The alarm port cable is not provided by Cisco Systems. Insert the cable connector into the alarm port. The cable connector cannot be incorrectly inserted into the alarm port.

The alarm port is used to monitor fatal or severe errors that cause Cisco IOS to crash. The alarm port is connected to a normally closed solid state relay. Cisco IOS writes to a hardware port and the relay contact opens. If the system enters into a ROMmon or watchdog reset state, the relay contacts close. The closing contacts alert the alarm annunciator or monitor that a Cisco IOS crash has occurred.

If interfaces fail or other non-fatal errors occur, the alarm port does not respond. Continue to use SNMP to manage these types of errors.

For alarm port specifications, see Appendix A, "Specifications," the "Alarm Port" section on page A

Using the Cable-Management Bracket

Figure  Securing Interface Cables Through the Cable-Management Bracket

1

Input/output cables

2

Cable-management bracket


Secure port adapter interface cables and input/output cables by placing them through the cable-management bracket.

Proceed to the "Connecting Power" section to complete the installation.

Connecting Power

This section provides the procedures for connecting AC-input and DC-input power to your Cisco router.


Warning This unit might have more than one power supply connection. All connections must be removed to de-energize the unit. Statement



Warning This product relies on the building's installation for short-circuit (overcurrent) protection. Ensure that a fuse or circuit breaker no larger than  VAC, 15A U.S. ( VAC, 10A international) is used on the phase conductors (all current-carrying conductors). Statement 13


Connecting AC-Input Power

Figure  Dual-AC Power Supply Cables

Figure  Connecting AC-Input Power

1

AC power receptacle

2

Adjustable AC power cable-retention clip


Connect an AC-input power supply as follows:


Step 1 At the front of the router, check that the power switch is in the off (O) position.

Step 2 Plug the single power cable into the AC connector on the router, or if you have a dual-AC power supply, plug an AC power cable into each AC connector. The dual AC power supply cables are attached with screws to the chassis.

Step 3 If you have a single AC power supply, insert the cable-retention clip wire into the clip bracket holes. Then slide the plastic portion into the clip, adjusting it to the desired length. See Figure 

Step 4 Place the AC power cable in the adjustable cable-retention clip. The plastic part that grips the cable can be removed from the supporting wire and repositioned for better support of the cable.

Step 5 Plug the AC power supply cable into the AC power source. Repeat this step if you have a dual-AC power supply.


Note After powering off the router, wait a minimum of 30 seconds before powering it on again.




Note If required, use Sinewave Output UPS (uninterruptable power supply), not Ferro-resonant type UPS.


This completes the procedure for connecting AC-input power. Your installation is complete. Proceed to Chapter 3, "Starting and Configuring the Router," to start the router and to perform a basic configuration.

Connecting DC-Input Power


Note The color coding of the DC-input power supply leads depends on the color coding of the DC power source at your site. Make certain the lead color coding you choose for the DC-input power supply matches lead color coding used at the DC power source.



Warning When you install the unit, the ground connection must always be made first and disconnected last. Statement



Warning Before connecting or disconnecting ground or power wires to the chassis, ensure that power is removed from the DC circuit. To ensure that all power is OFF, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the OFF position, and tape the switch handle of the circuit breaker in the OFF position. Statement



Warning This product relies on the building's installation for short-circuit (overcurrent) protection. Ensure that a Listed and Certified fuse or circuit breaker no larger than 60 VDC, 15 A is used on all currently-carrying conductors. Statement 96



Caution The DC return connection to this system is to remain isolated from the system frame and chassis (DC-I).

Connect a DC-input power supply as follows:


Step 1 At the front of the router, check that the power switch is in the off (O) position.

Step 2 Ensure that no current is flowing through the DC power supply leads. To ensure that all power is off, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the off position, and tape the switch handle of the circuit breaker in the off position.

Step 3 Using a wire stripper, strip approximately inch (14 mm) from the -V and +V leads.

Figure  Attaching the Leads to the DC Plug and the DC Plug to the DC Connector

1

DC plug

4

Single DC power connector

2

Lead

5

Dual DC power connector

3

+ and - embossed on connector

  

Step 4 Insert the -V and +V leads into the DC plug that ships with the Cisco router. The plug allows you to unplug the DC wires from the power supply without having to unscrew the leads.

a. Orient the plug (1) to the connector (4) as shown in Figure  The plug inserts only one way. Notice the symbols, + A -, embossed on the connector (3). Use the symbols and the orientation of the plug to guide you when inserting the leads into the plug.

b. Insert the +V lead (2) into the plug as shown in Figure , and tighten the screw to hold the lead to the plug.

c. Insert the -V lead into the plug as shown in Figure , and tighten the screw to hold the lead to the plug.

Step 5 If you have a dual DC power supply, repeat Step 4 for the second plug.

Step 6 Insert the DC plug into the DC power connector on the chassis. If you have a dual DC power supply, insert the second DC plug into the DC power connector.

Step 7 Switch the circuit breaker to the on position.

Step 8 Press the power switch to turn on the router.

For information on Cisco product specifications and power supply, refer to Cisco Router Data Sheet at the following URL:

https://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps/ps/product_data_sheetaa.html


Note After powering off the router, wait a minimum of 30 seconds before powering it on again.



This completes the procedure for connecting DC-input power. Your installation is complete. Proceed to Chapter 3, "Starting and Configuring the Router," to start the router and to perform a basic configuration.

Sours: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/routers//install_and_upgrade//_install_and_config_guide/icg/i.html
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